Author Topic: What does "for sell" actually mean?  (Read 1317 times)

Online oldbike54

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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #90 on: July 11, 2018, 08:11:33 PM »
Do me one favor . Make sure no one as scruffy as me attends my funeral

Offline Daniel Kalal

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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #91 on: July 11, 2018, 09:14:31 PM »
Correct sir

Hmmm.  If a British officer says it came from a Cherokee word for "coward", I'm inclined to be suspicious of that British officer's motives (or his knowledge of the language--whether Cherokee or English), and would look back much further in time.  Now, if this same British officer claimed it meant "brave and true" (in any language) I'd be inclined to give him some slack...

This is a well-researched word. 


Online oldbike54

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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #92 on: July 11, 2018, 09:24:50 PM »
Hmmm.  If a British officer says it came from a Cherokee word for "coward", I'm inclined to be suspicious of that British officer's motives (or his knowledge of the language--whether Cherokee or English), and would look back much further in time.  Now, if this same British officer claimed it meant "brave and true" (in any language) I'd be inclined to give him some slack...

This is a well-researched word.

 Probably true Daniel , but the modern day Cherokees still believe the word came from Eankke , and the words are pronounced much the same .

 Dusty
Do me one favor . Make sure no one as scruffy as me attends my funeral


Online Lannis

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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #93 on: July 11, 2018, 09:56:15 PM »
Hmmm.  If a British officer says it came from a Cherokee word for "coward", I'm inclined to be suspicious of that British officer's motives (or his knowledge of the language--whether Cherokee or English), and would look back much further in time.  Now, if this same British officer claimed it meant "brave and true" (in any language) I'd be inclined to give him some slack...

This is a well-researched word.

A good example of a "folk etymology", like people claiming that the bird "nuthatch" was named that because it would try to hatch acorns in its nest.

Not true, but it makes a good story, so if enough people "believe" it's true, that makes it true in some people's minds.

You can have good fun with it though ...



Lannis
A friend's 5-year-old saw a rhinoceros and called it a "Battle Unicorn".   We should let 5-year-olds name all new species.

Offline rocker59

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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #94 on: July 12, 2018, 11:44:52 AM »
Yankee

-AJ

"Yankee" is the Anglicized Dutch word "Janke" (John).  British colonists originally used it as a term for Dutch colonists.  Then it came to be applied by British to all American colonists. 

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Online oldbike54

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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #95 on: July 12, 2018, 11:54:03 AM »
"Yankee" is the Anglicized Dutch word "Janke" (John).  British colonists originally used it as a term for Dutch colonists.  Then it came to be applied by British to all American colonists.

 Actually the origins of the term are lost to history , I've read the Dutch thing , it really doesn't have anymore validity than the Cherokee origins . The first written usage of the word was by a British General in 1775 . So who really knows .

 Dusty
« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 11:54:42 AM by oldbike54 »
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Offline rocker59

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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #96 on: July 12, 2018, 12:31:55 PM »
Actually the origins of the term are lost to history , I've read the Dutch thing , it really doesn't have anymore validity than the Cherokee origins . The first written usage of the word was by a British General in 1775 . So who really knows .

 Dusty

Dusty,

Not to argue, but the term "Yankee" dates to the 1680s, a hundred years before the British soldier made up the Cherokee connection.  In the 1780s, Cherokee didn't have that word in their vocabulary.


Yankee (n.)
1683, a name applied disparagingly by Dutch settlers in New Amsterdam (New York) to English colonists in neighboring Connecticut. It may be from Dutch Janke, literally "Little John," diminutive of common personal name Jan; or it may be from Jan Kes familiar form of "John Cornelius," or perhaps an alteration of Jan Kees, dialectal variant of Jan Kaas, literally "John Cheese," the generic nickname the Flemings used for Dutchmen.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/Yankee

« Last Edit: July 12, 2018, 12:34:57 PM by rocker59 »
Michael T.
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Re: What does "for sell" actually mean?
« Reply #97 on: July 12, 2018, 12:58:46 PM »
Dusty,

Not to argue, but the term "Yankee" dates to the 1680s, a hundred years before the British soldier made up the Cherokee connection.  In the 1780s, Cherokee didn't have that word in their vocabulary.


Yankee (n.)
1683, a name applied disparagingly by Dutch settlers in New Amsterdam (New York) to English colonists in neighboring Connecticut. It may be from Dutch Janke, literally "Little John," diminutive of common personal name Jan; or it may be from Jan Kes familiar form of "John Cornelius," or perhaps an alteration of Jan Kees, dialectal variant of Jan Kaas, literally "John Cheese," the generic nickname the Flemings used for Dutchmen.

https://www.etymonline.com/word/Yankee

 That's interesting , had never read that before , although how anyone would know when the Cherokees started using the word Eankke might be hard to determine .

 And no , we aren't arguing Brother Mike , just exploring  :thumb:

 Dusty
Do me one favor . Make sure no one as scruffy as me attends my funeral


 

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