Author Topic: Trying to change V7C air filter, and can't get airbox cover out of the frame  (Read 524 times)

Offline sstone14

  • New Egg
  • *
  • Posts: 61
I started this process based on these instructions:

https://flickr.com/photos/sign216/albums/72157638864403325/with/11470971416/

But it turns out I can't fit the airbox cover out between the frame, the cylinder, and the exhaust (I have no idea how Joe did it to the V7C in these pictures--seems like black magic based on my experience so far).

So it seems like I'll have to remove the gas tank to perform this maintenance after all (see previous post on this matter here: https://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=115734.0).

Since everyone is telling me not to remove the gas tank, though, does it make more sense to remove the exhaust header? I've never done that before either, so any input is much appreciated.

Should I remove the gas tank? And if so, how do I do that?

OR

Should I remove the exhaust header pipe to make room to fit the airbox cover out between the frame and the cylinder? And if so, what do I need to know before jumping into that project?

Thanks y'all.
« Last Edit: August 03, 2022, 02:25:18 AM by sstone14 »
'10 V7 Classic

Offline guzzisteve

  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 10671
  • "Just Ride It"
Have you tried taking off the voltage regulator and coming out the front? This is what pic #2 is about, Try that.
Study pic #2, says horns too.
"Pray through Carlo & your bike shall be healed"
Location: Planet Earth

Offline sstone14

  • New Egg
  • *
  • Posts: 61
Have you tried taking off the voltage regulator and coming out the front? This is what pic #2 is about, Try that.
Study pic #2, says horns too.

Hi Steve,

Thank you for the reply. Yeah, I removed the regulator and horns. I will definitely give fitting the air box cover through the front a shot tomorrow by late of day, but IIRC, that cross beam that's welded to the front of the frame, to which the regulator is bolted (when it is attached, that is), doesn't allow enough of a space above it (even after removing that triangular plastic piece on the front of the frame) to fit the air box cover through that triangular space.

Hoping I'm wrong, but will keep you posted.
'10 V7 Classic

Offline Bulldog9

  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 2263
  • Location: United States
I've not seen a V7 classic air filter setup, but thought it was under the tank?
MGNOC#23231
The Living: 1976 Convert, 2007 GRiSO, 2016 Stornello #742, 2008 1200 Sport
The Departed: 2017 MGX, 2014 Norge GT,  In Stasis: 1978 XS750, XS1100SF

Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi


Online Kev m

  • Not your normal Hombre
  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 30100
  • Yo from Medford, NJ
I've not seen a V7 classic air filter setup, but thought it was under the tank?

Yeah, but facing the front of the frame.

See Sign216's photo essay (link in OP's first post).
Current Fleet

18 Guzzi V7III Carbon Dark
16 HD FLHP
13 Guzzi V7 Stone
11 Duc M696

Online Antietam Classic Cycle

  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 13428
  • Happily stuck in the past.
    • Antietam Classic Cycle
  • Location: Rohrersville, Maryland
I've replaced the air filter on two Breva 750s without removing the tank. The airbox cover needed to be turned and rotated to a certain position, but it did finally come out.
Charlie

Offline krglorioso

  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 1507
  • Location: Burnet County, TX
Having seen numerous references to difficulties in replacing some Guzzi air filters, I am compelled to ask:  "What is the trigger that compels one to change an air filter?"  Sure, I know they have to be replaced, but I don't go by mileage.  Instead, I look for some performance decline, especially fuel mileage.  My '17 Honda 500 twin has over 12K miles on the OEM air filter and the bike consistently averages fuel mileage in the upper 70s/gallon.  It's reasonably easy to replace its filter, but the question remains, "Why?". 

Ralph
Ralph
"You don't stop riding because you got old; you got old because you stopped riding".

2004 Moto Guzzi Breva 750
2017 Honda CB-500F
2021 Royal Enfield Interceptor 650

Offline Bulldog9

  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 2263
  • Location: United States
I've replaced the air filter on two Breva 750s without removing the tank. The airbox cover needed to be turned and rotated to a certain position, but it did finally come out.

I'll keep that in mind when I start going through the one I just picked up. Won't be able to get it until November-ish.
Pretty little red one like this. Was hoping the filter was similar to the V7ii which is easy peasy.



MGNOC#23231
The Living: 1976 Convert, 2007 GRiSO, 2016 Stornello #742, 2008 1200 Sport
The Departed: 2017 MGX, 2014 Norge GT,  In Stasis: 1978 XS750, XS1100SF

Online Kev m

  • Not your normal Hombre
  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 30100
  • Yo from Medford, NJ
I'll keep that in mind when I start going through the one I just picked up. Won't be able to get it until November-ish.
Pretty little red one like this. Was hoping the filter was similar to the V7ii which is easy peasy.





Yeah, that would be one of the differences brought on by the single throttle body.
Current Fleet

18 Guzzi V7III Carbon Dark
16 HD FLHP
13 Guzzi V7 Stone
11 Duc M696

Offline guzzisteve

  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • Posts: 10671
  • "Just Ride It"
Most of Guzzi's need replacing at 10-12,000mi mark, at 5-6,000 you clean it off & inspect then change it next time.
The reason there is a maintenance scheduled is so there is NO interruption of service or breakdowns. Not because it's so dirty it won't perform, then it's too late. At that mileage they are dirty.
"Pray through Carlo & your bike shall be healed"
Location: Planet Earth

Offline rbond

  • Hatchling
  • **
  • Posts: 164
  • Location: Alexandria, La.
Remove regulator, horns too.Using a long flexible phillips screw driver to reach the four screws. Cover pulls out toward the front, the fish it out the side where a horn was. Then pull the filter/frame out, and fish it out the side. It is a tight fit. Who ever designed this should be shot...
2012 MG V7C
1976 Suzuki GT500A
1978 Suzuki GS400C (long gone)
1973 Suzuki TS 100K (first new bike)
1969 Honda S90 (very first bike)

Offline sstone14

  • New Egg
  • *
  • Posts: 61
Having seen numerous references to difficulties in replacing some Guzzi air filters, I am compelled to ask:  "What is the trigger that compels one to change an air filter?"  Sure, I know they have to be replaced, but I don't go by mileage.  Instead, I look for some performance decline, especially fuel mileage.  My '17 Honda 500 twin has over 12K miles on the OEM air filter and the bike consistently averages fuel mileage in the upper 70s/gallon.  It's reasonably easy to replace its filter, but the question remains, "Why?". 

Ralph

Hi Ralph,

At least for me, my bike has been experiencing choppy idle, and so I've just been working through various basic maintenance projects to see if any of them might solve the issue and smooth out the idle of the bike.

Other than that, it's a 12-year-old bike, it had around 14k miles on it when I got it, and I'm the third owner. So I'm also just going through these various basic maintenance projects to ensure that this bike with its slightly mysterious ownership and maintenance history is in optimal and safe riding condition. I had no way of knowing what the air filter looked like other than to get in there and open up the air box, so that's what I did, and while it was open, I just figured I'd stick in a high performance filter.
'10 V7 Classic

Online bad Chad

  • Gaggle Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 9342
  • Location: Central Il
Good luck!   I was never able to get the dam thing out when I had a v65, I tried and tried,  but eventually gave up.  It was still in pretty good shape when I sold it, so I hope the next guy was a better tech than I.
2007 Breva 1100  Red Arrow (and faster than yours!)
2016 CSC 250TT Zongshen
2017 V9 Roamer

 

***Wildguzzi Official Logo High Quality 5 Color Window Decals Back In Stock***
Shipping in USA Only. Awesome quality. Back by popular demand. All proceeds go back into the forum.
http://www.wildguzzi.com/Products/products.htm
Advertise Here