Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

General Category => Bike Builds, Rebuilds And Restorations Only => Topic started by: Dave Swanson on August 11, 2019, 10:45:07 AM

Title: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 11, 2019, 10:45:07 AM
It's hard to believe that I bought this V700 almost 12.5 years ago!   I think it is high time I get it together and on the road!

I purchased this bike in early April 2007 from Ken Johnson of Atlas Cycle in Tulsa, OK.  I found the bike on Cycle Trader.  When I did the deal with Ken his retirement was imminent as he was turning over the keys to the new owners in a few days.  He told me that the V700 would be the last bike sold out of Atlas Cycle during his ownership. 

The bike hadn't been registered for the road since 1977, and according to Ken it had been in his showroom for many years.  He stated that it was a very low mile machine with speedometer showing 81 miles

(https://i.postimg.cc/y8fBLYT9/1981.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I decided that a bike that had been sitting that long needed a thorough going over before being ridden.  I knew I wanted to replace the original barrels and pistons with Gilardoni units among other items I knew would come later.

Shortly after the bike arrived I began the teardown.

(https://i.postimg.cc/02jbx3Hp/1557.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7fvxnB46)

Not that I would doubt Ken, but after tearing down all the normal wear items on the bike jived with a bike that has very low miles.   The condition of the original tires, brakes, clutch and clutch spline indicate that this is a very low mile bike. 

The original Pirelli 4.00 - 18 Super Sports have the old date code indicating they were made in November 1966.  They are in amazing condition with no checking of the sidewall.  If this bike was going into a museum or for display only I would leave them on.  Since I plan on riding and having fun with this bike I will be replacing them with new production Duro tires, which have exactly the same tread pattern.  I am sure Duro copied the Pirelli  Super Sports because they are identical.

(https://i.postimg.cc/G25DfNXr/IMG-5040-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/JDjtDTwd)

After tearing the bike down and ordering the Gilardonis the bike has languished in several containers until now.   

Over the years I kept pecking away on the surface here and there.  I ordered a wiring harness from Greg Bender and had all of the rusty hardware re cadmium plated. 

Now is the time to get serious!

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 11, 2019, 11:11:48 AM
The V700 has many eye-catching features.  The tank, fenders, side panels, "pie crust" final drive,  speedometer and housing just look so good!  My all time favorite feature of the V700 is the oft maligned Dellorto SS1 29D carburetors.  I understand why many have replaced with later carbs, but to me a V700 doesn't look right without the original carburetors.

The SS1s on this bike had a few issues.  There was old crystallized gasoline in them which made disassembly difficult.  Thankfully there were only a few parts that needed to be replaced.  One of the pilot jets was seized and required a careful and nerve filled drilling operation to remove, but I was successful in the end!

Here are the carbs ready to be reassembled. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/Sss8Dq7D/IMG-5041-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7CFfZFR2)

And here is what $250 worth of SS1 spare parts look like.  I am not complaining about the price.  I am beyond happy that someone still has NOS bits for these carbs or I would also be running a newer carb.

(https://i.postimg.cc/L6G6SsPp/IMG-5029-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/w7cdcgFf)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on August 11, 2019, 01:43:54 PM
I'll definitely be following your progress. V700s (especially the earliest ones) are something special IMO. What you're starting with is infinitely nicer than mine.

I've only ever seen one set of SS1s that didn't leak and actually worked correctly. Mid 30s mpg isn't uncommon with SS1s, with a switch to VHBs bringing that up to ~ 50.

Good that you already bought the Gilardonis, V700 sets haven't been available for ~ 10 years.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 11, 2019, 02:42:35 PM
I'll definitely be following your progress. V700s (especially the earliest ones) are something special IMO. What you're starting with is infinitely nicer than mine.

I've only ever seen one set of SS1s that didn't leak and actually worked correctly. Mid 30s mpg isn't uncommon with SS1s, with a switch to VHBs bringing that up to ~ 50.

Good that you already bought the Gilardonis, V700 sets haven't been available for ~ 10 years.

I am hoping to up that number to 2!   :grin:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 11, 2019, 02:47:49 PM
Assembled and ready for battle! 

(https://i.postimg.cc/L6FHBSSS/IMG-E5042-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hhMWcHhZ)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 11, 2019, 03:35:59 PM

Good that you already bought the Gilardonis, V700 sets haven't been available for ~ 10 years.

Wow!  Am I glad I had the presence of mind to buy them 12 years ago. 

Charlie, you made me go down and take a look at them just in case I had dreamt I bought them.   :azn:

I checked over the contents also.  Ha!

(https://i.postimg.cc/wjMg9QYf/IMG-5043-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/jLpGXN5P)

(https://i.postimg.cc/L8WR5gHH/IMG-5044-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/yD02rdg5)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Frenchfrog on August 11, 2019, 04:03:02 PM
Wow...what a stunning bike Dave....congrats of finally getting started !!!!!! Will follow this with great interest
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 17, 2019, 03:31:10 PM
The more things I inspect on this bike the more I find conflicting wear indications.

Today I looked closely at the rear drive internal and external splines.  They are quite worn out, especially the rear wheel spline!  Too worn out to put back together that's for sure.  I am looking for splines now. 

I am beginning to get the impression that this bike sat around the shop so long it was used for a parts mule from time to time.  No way of knowing for sure, but that would explain the difference in wear items. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/P5FVLfMT/IMG-5079-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/87Mm9S30)

(https://i.postimg.cc/4x3FNHVW/IMG-5080-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/YhJxd9XF)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: canuck750 on August 18, 2019, 10:21:20 AM
Beautiful V7 Dave!

Are those Dellorto carbs painted from the factory?
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 18, 2019, 10:39:08 AM
Beautiful V7 Dave!

Are those Dellorto carbs painted from the factory?
Yes, that is the factory paint.  I will leave them as is and not touch up or respray.  It is quite unusual to still have the factory silver mostly intact I am sure.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Mayor_of_BBQ on August 18, 2019, 03:15:23 PM
Right off the sparklehorse and on to the NOS unicorn!

I like it, thanks for documenting, will be following this one
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on August 19, 2019, 05:35:58 PM
Very cool, Dave.  If my V700 wasn't so incomplete when I got it, it wouldn't be going down the custom path.  There's still some V700 details I would like to know and include/retain, so I'll be watching what you post.

Beautiful V7 Dave!

Are those Dellorto carbs painted from the factory?

Fwiw- my V7 Sport frame is painted argent, as custom mixed by the paint shop to match the paint on a NOS 27mm SS1 I had at the time.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 19, 2019, 06:05:57 PM
Very cool, Dave.  If my V700 wasn't so incomplete when I got it, it wouldn't be going down the custom path.  There's still some V700 details I would like to know and include/retain, so I'll be watching what you post.

Fwiw- my V7 Sport frame is painted argent, as custom mixed by the paint shop to match the paint on a NOS 27mm SS1 I had at the time.

Very interesting!.  Now that you say that the shade of silver is very reminiscent of the silver frame  V7 Sport owned by a local Guzzi guy.   Here is a shot of his bike.

(https://i.postimg.cc/hv89LrF9/Scan-20190819-2.png) (https://postimg.cc/bSJD81wJ)

I was very impressed with the color combo when I saw his bike in person.  When I restored my V7 Sport the frame needed a respray and I was sorely tempted to spray it silver, but in the end I went with the factory color for my bike which was black.   Sometimes I wish I had painted it silver.  Who would know that it didn't come from the factory that way but me?
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on August 19, 2019, 08:27:08 PM
Very interesting!.  Now that you say that the shade of silver is very reminiscent of the silver frame  V7 Sport owned by a local Guzzi guy.   Here is a shot of his bike.

(https://i.postimg.cc/hv89LrF9/Scan-20190819-2.png) (https://postimg.cc/bSJD81wJ)

I was very impressed with the color combo when I saw his bike in person.  When I restored my V7 Sport the frame needed a respray and I was sorely tempted to spray it silver, but in the end I went with the factory color for my bike which was black.   Sometimes I wish I had painted it silver.  Who would know that it didn't come from the factory that way but me?

My bike had been customized in the 70's long before I got it, with different red on tank & convenient lettering and apparently a different mixed batch of red for the frame- less of an orangish/signal red like the tank & boxes, more like cranberry but not the right cranberry, more purple.   The tank & toolboxes looked cool red to me but the frame didn't match or contrast well.  So I decided argent would look cool and that NOS SS1 was true Italian argent.  It was small & easier to shoot for a color match than other silver/argent parts I had that were attached to other Italian bikes.

I really like the red & argent combo.  That's the only thing Ive changed on this bike since I got it.  Mine was originally a black frame when new.  I have no idea how close this argent it to the original color used by Guzzi.

I recently missed an NOS 750S seat like that for $200.  When the guy priced it for me, his buddy next to him said he could use it if he was going to sell it so I lost out...
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 25, 2019, 04:51:31 PM
Much better!  Waiting on the wheel hub to be back in stock.

(https://i.postimg.cc/W3mQLstQ/IMG-5080-3.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/sQXn5dYc)

(https://i.postimg.cc/br7YCz54/IMG-5125-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Cn4VdVS4)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 31, 2019, 07:22:03 PM
I had decided to use one of Josh Cole's super nice fuse blocks instead of the stock unit. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/KYNzTjh8/IMG-5178-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/CZRSTFK3)

It's a good thing, because upon closer inspection a few days ago the stock fuse block had a smoke event in the past!

(https://i.postimg.cc/nLZrM75W/IMG-5181-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/xXxn4k9G)

I also decided to upgrade the safety of the electrical system with Greg Bender's super slick "relay solution" for Loop frames, along with one of his wiring harness sets.

(https://i.postimg.cc/rzXc322H/relay-solution-installation-bracket-left.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I had ordered Greg's wiring harness a few years ago before I decided to go with the new fuse block.  This necessitates changing from bullet style connectors to spade.  I wanted Greg to modify the harnesses to the spade connectors so it would be done professionally, unlike the shoddy product I would have produced.   I sent the harnesses and the relay kit down to him and he turned it around in 24 hours on a Labor Day weekend!  Customer service extraordinaire! 

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on September 01, 2019, 03:17:07 PM
The wheel hub was quite the little project to remove.   

The wheel hub OD is precision ground for a press fit, which I expected.   I was not expecting that the 6 bolts holding it in place would also have a press fit.  It took quite a few blows with the brass drift to remove each bolt.  During assembly, bolt hole alignment will be critical.

(https://i.postimg.cc/3JLKdT3g/IMG-5188-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ZCdkMXBR)

Using my trusty Jett lathe I fashioned a driver from a Craftsman 1 1/2" socket to push out the wheel hub.  The OD of the socket was a perfect size for a clearance fit of the wheel hub housing. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/tgs7XgPZ/IMG-5183-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/2qfCGr0r)

The driver will perform double duty when pressing in the outer races of the Timken bearings. 
(https://i.postimg.cc/4dzfdH3d/IMG-5186-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ZB5tsRpt)

I warmed up the wheel hub aluminum housing with my torch.  Using my cheapo Harbor Freight press with one big pop the hub let loose and it pressed out without drama.

(https://i.postimg.cc/kgpXhdZn/IMG-5184-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/v45scCbj)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on September 01, 2019, 06:36:59 PM
For those of us that have 4 speed Loops the preselector shaft housing does not have an o-ring (5 speeds have an o-ring).  Obviously transmission lube weeps it's way through without an o-ring. 

Patrick Hayes has developed a fixture for his lathe that allows him to accurately cut an o-ring groove in the housing.  And here is the punch line,  Patrick only charges $15 for this service including the return postage!  I would call that the deal of the century!  And it saves me hours of toil trying to reinvent the wheel.  My hat is off to those that selfishly help the Guzzi community, and Patrick certainly is one of those. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/7hPZW13z/IMG-5196-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/0M3v6wH5)

Patrick also has a method of repairing rear transmission covers that have been damaged by throw-out bearing destruction for a reasonable fee.  He uses special tubing stock that he imported from Europe to sleeve the bore.   

V700s used a caged roller with fragile cages that were prone to destruction.  I was lucky.  My caged roller was still intact and the bore in my cover was still in great shape. 

I am upgrading to the caged flat roller.  I would recommend this upgrade to anyone with a V700 in the original configuration.

(https://i.postimg.cc/J4xMFB03/IMG-5197-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/BXjrLbxt)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on September 11, 2019, 08:33:49 PM
After some discussion with Charlie we have decided the condition of the valves, guides, and seats do not warrant a valve job at this time.   

Charlie also reminded me earlier that V700 valves are no longer available.  They are not the same as used in Eldos and Ambos.  Just to be safe I snagged a couple sets.  It is always interesting to find parts still in their original wrap for the past 50 years.

If there are any smoking issues down the line these will come in handy!

(https://i.postimg.cc/HW4vPswG/IMG-5367-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/t7JzsbvD)

The valve faces of the original valves are in great shape.

(https://i.postimg.cc/HsYvGDzr/IMG-5363-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/14dr6dLS)

The seats are in very good condition also.

(https://i.postimg.cc/Wb5WTWYX/IMG-5366-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/fJ0jvKN9)

You gotta love the V700 valve covers.  None nicer than these on any of the models that followed in my opinion.

(https://i.postimg.cc/prZ09qWV/IMG-5370-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Mfn0N0fg)

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: jas67 on September 12, 2019, 05:47:23 AM
Wow, beautiful bike!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on September 21, 2019, 08:10:05 PM
The wheels are done!  I always like have the wheels finished and set aside early during a restoration. 

Since the rear wheel has a new splined hub and a new Timken bearings, shimming for preload needed to be performed. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/g2vkYNWJ/IMG-5518-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/yD8zjhW4)

Using one of the axles and spacers to take up the slack space allowing me to torque the axle nut, I just kept adding shims until it became too sloppy and then backed off until I hit the sweet spot. 

McMaster Carr has a great selection of metric shims that fit perfectly.  I ordered what should be a lifetime supply. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/26XCHt4H/IMG-5519-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/JDZw0PYJ)

(https://i.postimg.cc/sgRs07hR/IMG-5520-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/nCTyXs2d)

Wrenches down, time for a celebratory beer!

(https://i.postimg.cc/sX8RPhrq/IMG-5521-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/9RGSCzzY)

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on September 21, 2019, 08:13:13 PM
I also got all the black parts back from the painter today.

(https://i.postimg.cc/FHt3WWps/IMG-5489-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8jH7sbxq)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on September 26, 2019, 07:10:31 PM
Nice to see the black bits all done.  Looks great, Dave. And thank you for the Patrick Hayes heads-up...

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on November 12, 2019, 09:17:42 PM
I have been mulling over getting a new crank for the bike.  The original has some issues, score marks, etc, but not horrible.  My preference was to try to find a new one instead of a regrind, especially since I already had new stock diameter front, rear bearings, and rod shells.  I called Curtis Harper and wouldn't you know it he had one on the shelf!  New OLD stock!   
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on November 15, 2019, 04:11:28 PM
My beautiful NOS crank from Harpers.  It had been on the shelf for a LONG time. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/fLtQ7XxF/crank-2.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 15, 2019, 08:23:12 PM
My beautiful NOS crank from Harpers.  It had been on the shelf for a LONG time. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/fLtQ7XxF/crank-2.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Sweet!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on November 15, 2019, 08:27:21 PM
Yup, Very cool. 
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: larrys on November 24, 2019, 08:52:30 AM
I also got all the black parts back from the painter today.

(https://i.postimg.cc/FHt3WWps/IMG-5489-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8jH7sbxq)

What did your painter use for paint? I've been a fan of powdercoating for frame and chassis bits, I know there are some tough paints, too.
Larry
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on November 24, 2019, 09:19:27 AM
What did your painter use for paint? I've been a fan of powdercoating for frame and chassis bits, I know there are some tough paints, too.
Larry

A single pack black as I recall.  Then he sprayed a coat of clear on it which I hadn't asked for and really preferred he had not.  I prefer the original look for frame paint.  The painter did such a high quality job I didn't have the heart to tell him I didn't want it that glossy. 

Personally I do not care for powdercoat.  As far as being tough, I have bikes that are 60 and 70 years old with the original frame paint that is holding up well. 
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on January 19, 2020, 09:09:22 AM
I had a bit of delay with my "new" crank.  The first crank I received had already been ground in its past life.  Curtis made it good on it of course,  searching through all of his V700 cranks until he found a truly NOS crank and sent it to me.  Harper's is one of the Guzzi resources that makes owning a Moto Guzzi more special. 
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on March 14, 2020, 02:16:41 PM
The tank that came with my bike is amazing!  It does seem like it has seen at least some fuel in its life, but certainly very little.  Anyone would mistake it for NOS.    It doesn't match with the condition of the fenders.  My fenders are in very nice shape and are original paint, but not in the same league as this tank.   As I said before, Ken Johnson of Atlas Cycle in Tulsa told me this was the last bike sold out of the shop while he still owned the shop.  He said this V700 was on display in the shop for quite awhile.   I can only assume that Ken switched out the tanks for some reason.  I will always be grateful that he did!  This tank is amazing, and I enjoy just looking at it.

(https://i.postimg.cc/pTk5V2dX/IMG-6352.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hzztpRxH)

(https://i.postimg.cc/J0G01ZgP/IMG-6356.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/SYbkd2mM)

(https://i.postimg.cc/D0ZJ8tWQ/IMG-6353.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/cgp4zkB6)

(https://i.postimg.cc/Y2nLJqVd/IMG-6354.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/PNDqDhdD)

(https://i.postimg.cc/yNyknVcX/IMG-6355.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/KK4G8h9R)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: shiskowd on March 15, 2020, 12:00:00 AM
The tank is indeed beautiful. The way the filler cap tightens down is pure art!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Canuck750 on March 15, 2020, 11:43:19 AM
That tank is pure GUZZI porn, what a time capsule.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on March 15, 2020, 12:32:50 PM
Very cool.  That's gorgeous.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 05, 2020, 05:34:31 PM
The engine is going together in earnest today!   After all those years since I tore it down I was very happy to find all the bagged parts organized nicely.   

I inspected the camshaft and it looks new.  The big end shells look like they could be re-used but since I have a new crank I went with new shells.  The wrist pin fit on the rod small ends is perfect.

New front and rear bearing housings of course to mate with the new crank.  And don't worry I did bend the tabs on the locking plates.

(https://i.postimg.cc/T2rJpzrz/IMG-6436.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/MXpQLr35)

I was also glad I had the presence of mind to mark the the gears with white out to duplicate the timing without drama.  I had forgotten I did that.

(https://i.postimg.cc/BnvT7td3/IMG-6438.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/CzWnzMhr)

When I was cleaning up the oil pick up housing there was a thin ribbon of sharp flashing.  It wouldn't have taken much for a thin piece to break off and do damage.  Luigi must have been a bit lazy that day.

(https://i.postimg.cc/Cx6j3Sgq/IMG-6439.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/rDx0W6zV)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Scout63 on April 05, 2020, 06:50:29 PM
What an interesting build thread, and those fine toothed timing gears are gorgeous.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 06, 2020, 07:53:35 PM
As Charlie informed me the V700 Gilardoni sets have been in the unobtainium category for a number of years.  Knowing that they are essentially irreplaceable makes me nervous handling them!  I am afraid of breaking a ring or dropping the cylinder on the floor.   :laugh:   I will do what I can to make this a worthy recipient of these now rare as hens-teeth parts!.

(https://i.postimg.cc/vm5zjc3q/IMG-6444.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hJPTQPFT)

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 07, 2020, 09:32:58 PM

The heads are in great shape.  I had taken the valves out for inspection and cleanup.  The valves look new and the seats were still perfect.  The valve stem to valve guide fit was excellent.

(https://i.postimg.cc/yxKgjPb8/IMG-6449.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/BLhnQx3r)

(https://i.postimg.cc/N0Wr9Y8T/IMG-6451.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/WDw4CBHb)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 08, 2020, 07:52:14 PM
Moving along nicely.  No missing parts!   Heads are torqued down.  I will re-torque them a time or two over the next few days before I put the rockers in place. 

This is definitely the fun stage!!

(https://i.postimg.cc/m2phTNmc/IMG-6453.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/fJXMKXnZ)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on April 09, 2020, 08:23:38 AM
Looks good, Dave.   Nice to see there's at least one V700 engine rebuild moving forward right now...

Do these later heads have the supplemental intake tract inserts?
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 09, 2020, 05:43:38 PM


Do these later heads have the supplemental intake tract inserts?

Yes.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 10, 2020, 05:08:48 PM
 In my opinion the V700 has the best looking valve covers in all of Guzzidom.   This is a momentous day, these covers have been squirreled away patiently for years waiting for this day.   :laugh:

(https://i.postimg.cc/N0rJyf66/IMG-6462.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/SXk734tR)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: shiskowd on April 10, 2020, 08:12:22 PM
Looking good Dave!  Those valve covers have that polish when you got the bike?  Debating if I should spend some time on the polishing wheel to get mine looking like that.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 10, 2020, 08:35:51 PM
Looking good Dave!  Those valve covers have that polish when you got the bike?  Debating if I should spend some time on the polishing wheel to get mine looking like that.

Yes, the V700s were polished all the way around from the factory. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/y8fBLYT9/1981.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 10, 2020, 08:40:28 PM
Getting serious now.  On the bike lift!  New clutch installed - Newfren, which is bonded and riveted. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/pXjXWK7k/IMG-6465.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ZCThjvJy)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Scout63 on April 10, 2020, 11:16:55 PM
Great pictures and great build. Please keep pictures coming.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Canuck750 on April 11, 2020, 08:23:40 AM
I agree with you on the V700 valve covers, definitely the best looking of the lot.

Great looking bike!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 11, 2020, 09:05:51 PM
I delved into the 4 speed transmission today.  I disassembled to do a proper job of input and output seal replacement, to give it a good scrub, and a good visual inspection.    All was going very well at first but by the end of the day  I had it apart and back together more times than I can count!   :boozing:   

I considered leaving it alone.  That would have been a good idea.   And when reading Guzziology later to figure out the shifter pall timing, Dave Richardson said "don't take the 4 speeds apart because nothing goes wrong with them and you don't want to deal with the shifter palls".  In so many words.

(https://i.postimg.cc/28V28wrg/IMG-6466.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/9rHGLy4B)

Of course when I took it apart the shifter pawls went flying.  When I took the gears and shafts out the shifter cam and fell out and I didn't note the orientation.   So I got an intense introduction to the Guzzi 4 speed.   The online documentation of the shifter pawl and cam plate is reversed from what it should be.  That ate up a couple of hours!


Cam plate is reversed from what it should be in this photo.
(https://i.postimg.cc/vZ57c2j2/IMG_6469.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/YvqLPRtQ)

Here you can see I assembled it per the photo.

(https://i.postimg.cc/CLXJZqK5/IMG_6468.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/BX52ktHf)

I took a break, had a snack and a cup of coffee and went back to work on it with a calm frame of mind.   I did what I should have done from the beginning and went through the operation of the shifter mechanism logically, found the right orientation for the cam plate by trial, reassembled and all was good.

Another milestone!!   With all the frustration I had with re-assembling the transmission I was awarded a bit of luck when mating the transmission to the engine.  The input spline lined up first time and slid right in with no jockeying.  That was a relief. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/43Z6tbRf/IMG_6475.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/QF4KZ7Mw)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on April 12, 2020, 09:23:04 AM
I loved doing four speed transmissions, so simple compared to five speeds. Did you bench test it to make sure it will shift through all four gears? Nothing worse than getting the bike all back together and only having two gears.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 16, 2020, 08:09:00 PM
I had a senior moment, but quickly realized that the engine has to be dropped into a Loop frame.  Those Tonti frames spoil you.    It has been at least 15 years since I restored my Eldo.  Easy fix!

(https://i.postimg.cc/59LNV7m7/IMG-6483.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7bPy1Nd0)

(https://i.postimg.cc/4N1fKYqp/IMG-6485.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/TppMF3RP)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on April 16, 2020, 10:12:12 PM
I had a senior moment, but quickly realized that the engine has to be dropped into a Loop frame.  Those Tonti frames spoil you.    It has been at least 15 years since I restored my Eldo.  Easy fix!

(https://i.postimg.cc/59LNV7m7/IMG-6483.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7bPy1Nd0)

(https://i.postimg.cc/4N1fKYqp/IMG-6485.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/TppMF3RP)

Loopframes spoil me, it's the Tonti frames that are the problem.  :wink: I like to start with a bare frame, set the engine in between the lower frame rails, then raise the frame to insert the front engine bolt. When I can't do that, I put blocks (or a lift jack) between the frame rails until they're just above the level of the tubes, set the engine onto the blocks (or jack pad), then raise the front of the frame to insert the bolt or lower the jack.

Seeing this makes me want to tear my '69 Ambo apart for restoration.  :shocked:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 17, 2020, 08:17:19 PM
A few more bits hung on the frame.  I am very lucky with these crashbars.  Original chrome and in almost perfect condition.

(https://i.postimg.cc/xT3FxCCj/IMG-6488.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/jLCXCRPB)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 18, 2020, 08:53:58 AM
A bit if minutae regarding V700 rear shocks.

My rear shocks are painted black. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/y8fBLYT9/1981.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I am 99% certain they were painted black at the factory, but recent photo searches for original and restored V700s show them with silver end caps.  I have not seen an internet picture of a V700 either original, or restored with black shocks.    I am going to disassemble them to inspect, clean and paint, therefore I have the option of changing to silver.

(https://i.postimg.cc/FRmkgqb7/v70011.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/nzCrkJjV/0014-15.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

The factory brochure shows them as black so black they will stay.

(https://i.postimg.cc/3R4rGFVd/brochure-moto-guzzi-v700-1967-page-06.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/0MvqRD8s)

(https://i.postimg.cc/FFk1khXD/brochure-moto-guzzi-v700-1967-page-03.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/K4FmdSzM)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on April 18, 2020, 09:17:27 AM
(https://i.postimg.cc/FRmkgqb7/v70011.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Those are Koni 76 series, same as was on my '69 Ambo when I bought it.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 18, 2020, 03:23:05 PM
As I unearth more parts and inspect sometimes a bit of mystery accompanies them.   My front fender which has all the characteristics of original paint has "extra" holes in it.  The extra holes are professionally done and have paint in the holes from when the fender was painted.  The only hole that has an indication of being used is the one for the left brake cable.    During a back channel convo with Charlie he reminded me that the front holes were for reflector mounts,  but reflectors weren't used until 1969.  Charlie also mentioned the second brake cable support hole would be for the 4LS brake that came out in 1974.   We hypothesized that this was a factory replacement fender procured in 1974 or later.  The factory probably had one fender blank that would work on all loop frames to that point, and in the color paint needed.  Seems like a plausible explanation.

I could take it to the painter, have him fill in the holes and respray, but I want to keep the original paint.  I will do as Charlie suggested and use rubber or soft plastic plugs, painted silver and be done. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/MKr7jNqz/IMG-6495.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/vcfgJP4K)

(https://i.postimg.cc/nV2YnMWj/IMG-6494.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/MXcjDZqq)

(https://i.postimg.cc/j2MzckfQ/IMG-6496.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/n9Qjc20C)

Love the remnants of the fender decal.
(https://i.postimg.cc/zvzCn1yG/IMG-6498.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/JDFHLv3f)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 25, 2020, 04:33:48 PM
I spent the day going through the starter thoroughly.  It really needed some TLC.  It was very dirty and the pinions were running bone dry in the bronze bushings with only rust to lubricate them.   :rolleyes:

I had sent the bits off to cad plate a long time ago.  Its always fun sorting through the hardware for the umpteenth time to find the correct bits.   :boozing:

(https://i.postimg.cc/bJNGwMr4/IMG-6528.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Jyv7TpbQ)

(https://i.postimg.cc/TPcLGGdr/IMG-6532.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/1gf5ckNt)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Canuck750 on April 25, 2020, 06:34:57 PM
As I unearth more parts and inspect sometimes a bit of mystery accompanies them.   My front fender which has all the characteristics of original paint has "extra" holes in it.  The extra holes are professionally done and have paint in the holes from when the fender was painted.
(https://i.postimg.cc/MKr7jNqz/IMG-6495.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/vcfgJP4K)

When I got my Eldorado the front holes had the Lucas reflectors installed there, I finished the bike with the reflectors back in the same holes.


(https://i.postimg.cc/tgG2RT8w/August-16-2012-006.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Yv81bprz)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 26, 2020, 06:24:56 AM
When I got my Eldorado the front holes had the Lucas reflectors installed there, I finished the bike with the reflectors back in the same holes.



Yes,  in general,  Ambos and Eldos should have reflectors ~ V700 not.  That Eldo was a beauty!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 26, 2020, 08:06:12 AM
The recent change in course regarding the engine installation had given me time to reflect on the job I did on the 4 speed.  In my excitement to marry the engine and trans together I had rushed through the 4 speed with a good measure of wishful thinking.  This did not give me peace of mind.  I have found that if I do not have a satisfied mental state on how the bike is going together it will affect my thoughts when riding it down the road.  I set out to rectify this state of dissonance over the course of the past week.

After my study of the 4 speed I can now say I have a much more thorough knowledge of how this clunk box works.  For the most part the 4 speed is dead simple, but the timing of the shifting pawls, and the timing of the shifter drum gear to the selector is a bit complex and absolutely critical to for proper shifting between all gears.  I also had the extra challenge of having an early 4 speed with the first style of symmetrical shifter pawls.  There is less information about these early pawls than the later non-symmetrical, notched pawls.   

This time I took a slow and methodical approach.   It took a few nights of experiments to determine exactly where the shift detent drum, shifter pawls, and selector should be for proper operation.   The only published picture of the shifter cam with early style pawls shows the cam plate installed backwards as mentioned before. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/vZ57c2j2/IMG_6469.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/YvqLPRtQ)

   Guzziolgy states "they (4 speeds)  have a complicated shift detent mechanism that can be extremely difficult to assemble".   I would have to agree with Dave R on this if you don't know the secret sauce.  Once the the proper orientation of all the bits is clear in your mind the transmission can be whipped apart and back together in no time, but it took me quite a few hours of experimentation to get there.   During a couple of evenings early in the week I was beginning to doubt that I would be successful.  I contemplated boxing up the transmission and sending it to Charlie because he has worked on many over the years.  But I persevered and arrived at the point of enlightenment!   :thumb:

This is the orientation that I arrived at for the shifter pawls and cam plate with the transmission in 4th gear.

(https://i.postimg.cc/13r1Sx3Q/IMG-6479.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/9D0nPn98)


Overcoming these types of mental challenges is exactly why I enjoy restoring motorcycles so much.  They really make it interesting and worthwhile.  A few of my favorite Robert Pirsig quotes from Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance are on my shop wall. 

"Working on a motorcycle, working well, caring, is to become part of a process, to achieve an inner peace of mind.  The motorcycle is primarily a mental phenomenon". 

And

"The real cycle you are working on is a cycle called yourself"

Since I was back into the transmission, I also decided not to put anything back in the transmission that was substandard.  The 4 speed is prone to speedometer gear slippage if the layshaft lock nut is not sufficiently tight.  My transmission had evidence of this slippage and corresponding wear on the output spacer, 1st gear, and thrust washer.  All have now been or will be replaced.  The first gear (earliest version with straight cut gears) and thrust washer were found at Harpers.  The output spacer is also on its way from Harpers. 

Pirsig
"The study of the art of motorcycle maintenance is really a miniature study of the art of rationality itself".


Now if Charlie comments that I got it all wrong, I will retire with my bottle of Jack Daniels, never to be seen again.   :grin:  :boozing:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 26, 2020, 05:56:32 PM
While waiting for the transmission spacer I took the opportunity to get some of the miscellaneous black bits ready.   The shocks were disassembled, chrome springs were polished and caps bead blasted.  Shock body was wire wheeled and cleaned with solvent before paint.  The regulator cover and breather assembly were bead blasted and painted also.

(https://i.postimg.cc/DZyp4gbJ/IMG-6538.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/mcJy07jB)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on April 26, 2020, 07:14:46 PM
 :thumb: :thumb:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 28, 2020, 04:35:57 PM
Clutch pushrod orings in.  My early 4 speed only can handle 4 of them.  5 speeds can accept 6 and Charlie mentioned later 4 speeds also.

(https://i.postimg.cc/Lszw2bKj/IMG-6527.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/FfHDxGKK)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Scout63 on April 29, 2020, 06:48:49 AM
Dave - do you fit the o rings until no more will fit in there or do I just fit 6 in my five speed?   I just bought the o rings - very pricey.  Great picture.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 29, 2020, 07:01:48 AM
Dave - do you fit the o rings until no more will fit in there or do I just fit 6 in my five speed?   I just bought the o rings - very pricey.  Great picture.

Only the number to the point you can feel it's limiting the travel of the plunger.   Pretty safe to say your 5 speed will take 6.  Just make sure all of them have been removed.   I bought mine at my local hardware store. Cheap
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on April 29, 2020, 08:27:55 AM
No need to buy o-rings - I will send anyone that wants some a set of 6 for FREE. I've never found them at any hardware store since they're a pretty unusual size.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on April 29, 2020, 08:42:43 AM
Dave, thanks very much for the documentation.  I'm confident it will help me. 

The more I see about the V700 (especially from you and Charlie) the more happy I am to have one in the works.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 29, 2020, 08:44:47 AM
- I will send anyone that wants some a set of 6 for FREE. I've never found them at any hardware store since they're a pretty unusual size.

I almost asked you for a set but my local old school (non chain) hardware store has everything!  They are a local legend.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Scout63 on April 29, 2020, 10:58:12 PM
Just to amuse everyone - I bought them through F-1.  Very quick service, but charged 8 or 9 dollars each plus shipping. I think Iím into the rings for over 60.00. Oh well.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 02, 2020, 09:17:39 AM
How I became enamored with the V700.

My first introduction to Moto Guzzi was the purchase of my V7 Sport over 20 years ago.   After I restored that I found myself drawn to finding a nice Loop.  The only Loop I had any interest in owning was an Eldorado.  I found an Eldo in need of TLC and restored it also. 

I never really considered finding a V700 since I figured one Loop was enough, and besides I felt I had the best of the lot already with my disc Eldo.   

Not long after my Eldo was completed I started running into a Chicago area BMW rider at the area motorcycle swap meets and struck up a friendship.  He was telling me about a 68 Guzzi he was restoring, and of course I was interested to hear his progress reports.   One fine day at the Spring Walnecks  swap meet in Woodstock he rode the V700 out.  There is an area where the classic bikes are parked.  I was looking at all the cool bikes, Knucks, Pans and Brits when my friend rides in on his freshly restored V700.    At the time I had Knucklehead fever, but when he pulled into the meet with that V700 I couldn't get over how cool that V700 was!  It really has something special about it that must be witnessed in person to get the full effect.

After that I started looking for a good V700 project bike.  It didn't take too long before I found my V700 at Atlas Cycle in Tulsa.  I am stoked to finally be getting close to the day I can ride it.  I have lost touch with my friend from Chicago.  I would like to contact him, but lost all of his old emails when my Outlook crashed and I lost all of my old emails a few years ago. 
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 03, 2020, 08:32:55 PM
I am lucky to have some rare small bits that most V700s don't have anymore.

Both of the rarities can be seen in the factory photo.

(https://i.postimg.cc/FFk1khXD/brochure_moto_guzzi_v700_1967_page_03.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/K4FmdSzM)

The housing at the terminus of the speedometer cable should be a silver plastic instead of the common black.

(https://i.postimg.cc/QMhSCRMJ/IMG_6592.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hXZV3ZTX)

And the detachable pillion strap.  Hard to find since it was easily detached and lost.

(https://i.postimg.cc/0QNfdDD6/IMG_6593.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/5HZLfHP1)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on May 03, 2020, 09:07:42 PM
I am lucky to have some rare small bits that most V700s don't have anymore.

Both of the rarities can be seen in the factory photo.

(https://i.postimg.cc/FFk1khXD/brochure_moto_guzzi_v700_1967_page_03.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/K4FmdSzM)

The housing at the terminus of the speedometer cable should be a silver plastic instead of the common black.

(https://i.postimg.cc/QMhSCRMJ/IMG_6592.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hXZV3ZTX)

And the detachable pillion strap.  Hard to find since it was easily detached and lost.

(https://i.postimg.cc/0QNfdDD6/IMG_6593.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/5HZLfHP1)

Because of this post, I finally figured out what the NOS teardrop with two holes shaped tabs I have are for.  :grin:

I have a few of those silver boots somewhere too.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 05, 2020, 05:10:29 PM
Horn back in place. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/s2651V3R/IMG-6606.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/nsmXPfsd)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: n3303j on May 05, 2020, 08:06:08 PM
Your replacement tires look like Duro HF308. My experience with these tires (10 years) is that they have very poor wet traction. Seem to do okay on dry pavement but break loose way too easily with firm braking on wet pavement.

Please be careful. It's a pretty special machine.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 05, 2020, 08:23:06 PM
Your replacement tires look like Duro HF308. My experience with these tires (10 years) is that they have very poor wet traction. Seem to do okay on dry pavement but break loose way too easily with firm braking on wet pavement.

Please be careful. It's a pretty special machine.

Thanks for the words of caution!  It sounds like the voice of experience.  Yes they are Duros.  Chosen because they are dead ringers for the original Pirelli Super Sports. I just couldn't get enthused about using a modern looking tire on this bike.  This bike will only be ridden on fair weather days 😀
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on May 05, 2020, 08:57:53 PM
I've had them on my V700 for the last 5k miles and my experience is exactly the opposite. Excellent traction wet or dry, pavement, dirt, gravel, everywhere (except mud). <shrug>
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 07, 2020, 04:27:17 PM
The lower shields for the V700 are quite rare.  I have always thought they make a cool and funky looking addition to the V700.  Here is a prime example with shields.

(https://i.postimg.cc/yxwPSjKB/dougs-new-load-040.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/g2yDn3TF/dougs-new-load-046.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/v4B9Kxy3)

Besides the shields, installing this setup requires the special foot pegs with bracket attached, and crashbar with tapped holes in welded reinforcements.   

Mike Skaggs (EldoMike) had the footpegs and he noticed Cam's listing for the crashbar and alerted me immediately.  Cam then put me in touch with his friend who just might have a set of shields that he would sell.  So with the help of the amazing WG community I now have the complete set!   :bow: 

Coming soon to a station near you! 

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: jas67 on May 07, 2020, 06:38:30 PM
The lower shields for the V700 are quite rare.  I have always thought they make a cool and funky looking addition to the V700.  Here is a prime example with shields.

(https://i.postimg.cc/yxwPSjKB/dougs-new-load-040.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/g2yDn3TF/dougs-new-load-046.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/v4B9Kxy3)

Besides the shields, installing this setup requires the special foot pegs with bracket attached, and crashbar with tapped holes in welded reinforcements.   

Mike Skaggs (EldoMike) had the footpegs and he noticed Cam's listing for the crashbar and alerted me immediately.  Cam then put me in touch with his friend who just might have a set of shields that he would sell.  So with the help of the amazing WG community I now have the complete set!   :bow: 

Coming soon to a station near you!

I'm glad that I could help (with the shields).   Do you have the footpegs?   AFAIK, the footpegs on my Eldo (that the shields came with) have the holes for the shields.     I'd gladly trade them for a pair of normal civilian pegs if that helps.



Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 07, 2020, 07:36:31 PM
I'm glad that I could help (with the shields).   Do you have the footpegs?   AFAIK, the footpegs on my Eldo (that the shields came with) have the holes for the shields.     I'd gladly trade them for a pair of normal civilian pegs if that helps.

Jay!  I should have known it was you!  Ha!  Yes, I have a set of proper pegs.   And I do want to keep my stock ones.  I may not always run the shields. 
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: jas67 on May 07, 2020, 09:03:08 PM
Jay!  I should have known it was you!  Ha!  Yes, I have a set of proper pegs.   And I do want to keep my stock ones.  I may not always run the shields.

LOL.  I figured you did know it was me.   
In any case, I'm looking forward to seeing pics of the final result.   I'm sure it'll be beautiful just like all your other restorations.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: s1120 on May 08, 2020, 08:06:49 AM
I am lucky to have some rare small bits that most V700s don't have anymore.

Both of the rarities can be seen in the factory photo.


And the detachable pillion strap.  Hard to find since it was easily detached and lost.

(https://i.postimg.cc/0QNfdDD6/IMG_6593.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/5HZLfHP1)

You know... Just something that struck me in the "where did they go" file...  Used to be every motorcycle had a seat strap...  then they just...left..  One of those things that vanish and you dont notice till much later..
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 14, 2020, 07:42:29 PM
The last month has been spent sorting my 4 speed.  The 4 speed is pretty simple, but does have a few quirks, most notably the shift detent system.   I also had a couple of worn out parts on the output/layshaft that made a few things mysterious.  Through a lot of trial and error and with much help and a few rare 4 speed parts  from CHARLIE   :bow:  I eventually achieved an enlightened state!   I can honestly say I can take this transmission apart and back together in the matter of 5 to 10 minutes now.  I could almost do it blindfolded. 

The last step after it was properly assembled with good parts in the all the right places, shimmed and shifting properly was to  fill the tranny with 750 cc of GL4 80W-90 gear lubex  I propped it up to give the input seal a leak check overnight.  Nice and dry!

Now I could install engine/trans into the frame with that peace of mind that only comes when all doubts are erased and all light bulbs are illuminated.  My favorite part of working on motorcycles is the mental challenges and developing the right frame of mind.

(https://i.postimg.cc/1RNWCpSn/IMG-6651-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/MXqbXfvq)

(https://i.postimg.cc/Dykxt8fC/IMG-6653-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Btp5FZKD)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on May 14, 2020, 08:56:08 PM
 :thumb:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 15, 2020, 06:32:37 PM
I get a kick out of the little things like the nicely done original boot clamps all freshly plated and looking good.

Under the boot is the original u-joint rebuilt by John Chicoine back in 2009!  I looked up his old email and he mentioned it was showing signs of wear.  BTW John has a very nicely restored V700!

(https://i.postimg.cc/251ghV0Y/IMG-6659.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8FVyVP8X)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 16, 2020, 07:09:08 AM
We have to try hard to look past Ann Margaret's beautiful visage, but this is a very good reference photo of an early V700.  I say early mostly because of the wider black pinstripe around the chrome tank panels.  According to Greg Field's excellent book, Moto Guzzi Big Twins, it was stated that by 1968 the painters had improved their accuracy of laying down the red paint and required pin striping only half the width of earlier.

(https://i.postimg.cc/fLnB2N4t/IMG-E4008.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/5HgByD2b)

By the way it was due to buying this book years ago that I got the bug to find a V7 Sport.   The beautiful V7 Sport on the cover and others in the book haunted me until I found one of my own.   The V700 on the front cover isn't too shabby either.  The V7 Sport and V700 on the cover were owned by Glen Bewley.  I wonder if he still has them?   By the way, used copies of this book are available from the usual sources and are not too expensive. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/L4ZZ411p/motoguzzi-big-twins.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 17, 2020, 08:03:31 PM
It was a productive weekend!

(https://i.postimg.cc/2ytHcdkT/IMG-6664.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/4Hzbn9hh)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: berniebee on May 17, 2020, 09:54:31 PM
Just an outside question here: How do you get your large pics to appear? When I post, my pics appear about a quarter of this size. (Though you can click on them to get a larger view)

Nice build, BTW. And feel free to post more pics of Ann Margaret, with or without a Guzzi!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 18, 2020, 06:08:53 AM
Just an outside question here: How do you get your large pics to appear? When I post, my pics appear about a quarter of this size. (Though you can click on them to get a larger view)



I am using Postimage for my photos. 
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: LesP on May 18, 2020, 07:07:36 AM
Fantastic !
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Canuck750 on May 18, 2020, 07:32:32 PM
How do you keep such a clean shop Dave?
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 18, 2020, 07:59:53 PM
How do you keep such a clean shop Dave?

I take the picture at the end of the day after I have cleaned up.  If you noticed,  I don't take pictures of my workbench.😎
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 19, 2020, 08:20:10 PM
The speedometer for this bike is super nice!  The reason it has only 81 miles will forever remain a mystery.  It was obvious the speedometer drive was slipping for a very long time, but that doesn't explain the whole mystery.   I have essentially zero timed this bike so 81 miles is appropriate now.

(https://i.postimg.cc/kgFLkyNg/IMG-6674.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/PCJ6DYFg)

(https://i.postimg.cc/GpL6rszJ/IMG-6675.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/mPnmykvt)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 25, 2020, 07:32:44 PM
I am well into the wiring.  Greg Bender's wiring harnesses are things of beauty.  I always marvel at what he has done for the Guzzi community.

As I admire the details of this bike I ponder how inspired the overall design for the V700 was back in the day.  The attention to detail exhibited by the Guzzi design engineers is amazing.  And to think all of this was accomplished while Guzzi was teetering on bankruptcy.

All the tinware on this bike has all the telltale trademarks of much hand work.  You can see all of the craftsmanship.  The V700 was well executed at all levels including the artisan shop workers. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/QMLHzSxy/IMG-6763.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/0zfkMYSY)

(https://i.postimg.cc/13V8MbPF/IMG-6768.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/jDKqSgDq)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 26, 2020, 12:32:36 PM
I am deviating from stock to add one of Greg Benders "relay solution" panels.  It is a slick product that will protect the electrical system.  If rewiring a Loop I highly recommend it. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/gcC7JdZx/thumbnail-IMG-6769.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8sb4K2wG)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: v7john on May 26, 2020, 02:51:15 PM
Great minds think alike. I put this together for my V7 a few years back. I used fused relays. Flasher can on the right.(https://racingrhino.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/dscf1190.jpg)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 26, 2020, 05:22:32 PM
Great minds think alike. I put this together for my V7 a few years back. I used fused relays. Flasher can on the right.(https://racingrhino.files.wordpress.com/2017/06/dscf1190.jpg)

Nicely done John!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on May 26, 2020, 06:07:27 PM
On my V700, I chose to forego relays and installed an LED bulb in the H4 headlight instead. Less draw than even the original (45/40 watt) headlight and much brighter. No chance of melting the switch or fuseblock, the LED bulb does mind if the voltage drops as low as 8 volts. I put the starter relay down behind the starter, but then my V700 is far from stock in many ways and was never intended to be.  :azn: There's nothing to the rear of my battery but the fender.


(https://i.ibb.co/xX854hg/V700-starter-relay.jpg) (https://ibb.co/xX854hg)


Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 26, 2020, 08:26:30 PM
If I keep this up it will be running soon!  First time on two wheels in eons!!!

The main hold up right now is my ignition switch.  I forgot I did not have a key for it.  The local locksmith has been working on cutting a key based on the tumbler code but has been having problems.  He hopes to have the keys cut tomorrow.

(https://i.postimg.cc/wxFvY6bd/IMG-6773.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/w3yHhdpW)

(https://i.postimg.cc/KvzYZdd3/IMG-6774.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/hhkns34K)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on May 26, 2020, 08:44:47 PM
 :thumb: :thumb:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 28, 2020, 08:43:50 PM
I got slightly ahead of myself, but couldn't resist mounting the tank and seat to see how it looks.

(https://i.postimg.cc/vHJKJtGx/IMG-6783-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Yhx8ggGt)

(https://i.postimg.cc/DZ5kFJxk/IMG-6785-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/VrSHW6yD)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: jas67 on May 28, 2020, 09:21:49 PM
Wow.   Just Wow!
Bellissimo!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Klinkhammer on May 29, 2020, 08:58:38 AM
Very handsome!!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 30, 2020, 09:18:03 PM
Productive day!  I finished the wiring.   The got the fuel bottle out and started it up in the backyard.  It started right up and idled pretty good.  I set the timing with a strobe light, adjusted the balance on the carbs and took it for a ride.  It runs beautifully!   The 4 speed shifts very well for what it is.  The straight cut first gear whines like a reverse gear in an old Chevy.  Pretty cool. 

I put about 15 miles on it.  Tomorrow I will re-torque the heads.

(https://i.postimg.cc/NjBftN29/IMG-6804-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/svHR94cs)

(https://i.postimg.cc/J4KSyKdB/IMG-6810-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/tYZBwdbX)

(https://i.postimg.cc/RVvjV2GB/IMG-6808-2.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/MXrs9PhP)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: shiskowd on May 31, 2020, 06:32:18 PM
Wow - great pictures of a beautiful bike.   :thumb: :thumb:

Love that fuel tank.  Did you have a solo seat setup as well?
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on May 31, 2020, 07:28:58 PM
  Did you have a solo seat setup as well?

I have a reproduction solo from Cycle Garden, but I won't be using it.  I like the stock seat too much. 
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: cliffrod on May 31, 2020, 09:51:37 PM
Congratulations, Dave.  Well done- That's a beautiful motorcycle.   

And thank you for the education you've provided to the rest of us along the way.. It is very much appreciated.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on June 07, 2020, 07:59:04 PM
I have put a 100 miles on it now.  Everything is well fettled.  It is a real joy to ride!

(https://i.postimg.cc/Kjh1tgjj/IMG-6865.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/dknQY38c)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on June 07, 2020, 08:56:47 PM
 :thumb:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: 80CX100 on June 11, 2020, 11:39:01 PM
Hey Dave,     That's very well done, has a classic regal look to it  :bow: :thumb:

     Hope you get some good riding in on it.

      :bike-037:

Tks for documenting and showing the work along the way, beauty to watch it all come to fruition.

Kelly
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on June 14, 2020, 07:20:52 AM
Final update.   With the help of Frank Wedge I have been in contact with Ken Johnson, the former owner of Atlas Cycle in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

Ken is now 82.  He and his wife are in great health.  He still rides regularly and has a good sized motorcycle collection.  He plans on attending the National MGNOC rally in Scott City, Kansas.

He also remembered the name of the original owner of the V700, Alcardio Douglas.  Alcardio was a mail carrier in Tulsa, and traded in the V700 on a new 77 Convert.   The V700 was so nice that Ken kept it in his collection for the next 30 years!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Canuck750 on June 14, 2020, 09:38:26 AM
Fantastic looking bike :thumb:
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 22, 2020, 08:03:04 AM
The last piece of the V700 is in place.  There are 3 major pieces, the shields, special crash bars with tapped holes, and special footpeg brackets.   

Once I put the word out I was amazed how quickly these 3 rare items came together.  Eldo Mike,  Jay jas67, and Cam3512 all contributed. 

The last piece from Jay was in amazing condition, but had had some sheet-metal modifications in the past. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/htp7cXS4/thumbnail-IMG-2382.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

The painter I go to is also quite talented with sheet-metal repairs.  They turned out fantastic!

(https://i.postimg.cc/ZYBPHxJ8/IMG-7275.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Hjm7s5cn)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on September 20, 2020, 04:45:00 PM
Installation of the lower shields will wait until I am rehabbed and recovered from my hip replacement surgery coming up October 5th. 

The upcoming surgery has shortened my riding season and hastened getting the bikes in "winter mode".

(https://i.postimg.cc/yxHVgvj5/IMG-E7419.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/zbxm4w9S)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Ratso88 on September 24, 2020, 02:18:40 AM
Very nicely done. A real beauty.

and, best of luck with he hip job.

Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: jas67 on October 12, 2020, 08:23:11 PM
Dave -- best of luck with the hip surgery -- thorough PT will bring you back to service!
In the meantime, while you recovery, you have many beautiful bikes to sit and look at.
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Glawster on November 23, 2020, 04:16:31 AM
What a first class job you've made of that bike Dave!  It really looks fabulous and I'm sure it rides just as well.  I've never owned a loop, but my mate from Inverness Scott Muir built one a couple of years ago.  Scott is up there with you for the quality of his rebuilds.  I'm in too much of a hurry to the bike finished and inclined to cut a few corners.  Also I'm a Yorkshireman, well known for having short arms and deep pockets.  Anyway, Scott turned up at one of our "MacGiro" events with his newly built V7 and we had a nice tour of the Scottish Borders.  I think he fitted 850GT barrels and pistons, and the bike certainly wasn't short of oomph.  Handling encouraged a more "relaxed" style of riding compared to the V7 Sport and this loop was quickly dubbed "The Chesterfield" on account of it being like a comfortable old sofa!

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50637065771_6912d9e629_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2k9Ccu8)DSC_0122 (https://flic.kr/p/2k9Ccu8) by Derek Wardell (https://www.flickr.com/photos/154993838@N08/), on Flickr

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50636317568_357a892f38_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2k9yn55)DSC_0151 (https://flic.kr/p/2k9yn55) by Derek Wardell (https://www.flickr.com/photos/154993838@N08/), on Flickr
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on November 23, 2020, 07:48:58 AM
What a first class job you've made of that bike Dave!  It really looks fabulous and I'm sure it rides just as well.  I've never owned a loop, but my mate from Inverness Scott Muir built one a couple of years ago.  Scott is up there with you for the quality of his rebuilds.  I'm in too much of a hurry to the bike finished and inclined to cut a few corners.  Also I'm a Yorkshireman, well known for having short arms and deep pockets.  Anyway, Scott turned up at one of our "MacGiro" events with his newly built V7 and we had a nice tour of the Scottish Borders.  I think he fitted 850GT barrels and pistons, and the bike certainly wasn't short of oomph.  Handling encouraged a more "relaxed" style of riding compared to the V7 Sport and this loop was quickly dubbed "The Chesterfield" on account of it being like a comfortable old sofa!

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50637065771_6912d9e629_o.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2k9Ccu8)DSC_0122 (https://flic.kr/p/2k9Ccu8) by Derek Wardell (https://www.flickr.com/photos/154993838@N08/), on Flickr

(https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/50636317568_357a892f38_k.jpg) (https://flic.kr/p/2k9yn55)DSC_0151 (https://flic.kr/p/2k9yn55) by Derek Wardell (https://www.flickr.com/photos/154993838@N08/), on Flickr

Nice V700!  And love the shot of the 2.  Looks like a great place to ride!
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Dave Swanson on April 29, 2021, 09:06:16 PM
I finally had the opportunity to install the leg shields today.  Thanks a million to Cam3512. EldoMike, and of course Jas67 for helping make this happen. 

(https://i.postimg.cc/tT9TNMQj/IMG-8573.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/8FnN1wzK)

(https://i.postimg.cc/hjMGy1c7/IMG-8576.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/S22qj8Xy)
Title: Re: 1968 V700 Rejuvination
Post by: Frenchfrog on April 30, 2021, 11:29:43 AM
Stunning job Dave...