Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

General Category => Bike Builds, Rebuilds And Restorations Only => Topic started by: radguzzi on October 30, 2019, 07:57:00 PM

Title: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on October 30, 2019, 07:57:00 PM

Greetings all, new Convert convert here.  I am actually a long time Moto Guzzi owner, rider, wrench (aren't we all...?) and first time Convert owner.

This particular old boot, a '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert sat dormant since 1991 indicated by the last registration.  Actually stored properly or it seems to have been as bolting comes apart easily and the engine is not stuck... lol  Good start huh...?  


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/guYfcD.jpg) 


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/LSTE0y.jpg)

More later...
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on October 31, 2019, 07:12:36 AM

'76 V1000 Convert barn find status.

Great news, compression checks out well on both cylinders, nice blue spark from the Dyna III, lights work...

The compression check was a little weird, the throttle cables are stuck so I could not open the throttles but I think it is a good reading.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/k5XCjd.jpg)

We can move forward now.

Carbs come off and into the ultrasonic tub. Fluid changes, parts order for brake rebuilds, carb kits, hoses and cables going out.

Getting excited...!

So the statement about the Convert having been stored properly may have been just a bit premature...

I had mentioned that the throttle cables are stuck which made the compression check not as proper as it should have been. I popped the tops off the carbs and the slides are stuck along with the choke plungers... Ooops. They are soaking in Aerokroil.

New fuel lines and dual spigot banjos to eliminate the weird cross over under the carbs will go back it. Looks innocent enough huh..?

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/ssgrwK.jpg)

Stuck, soaking, thinking about what they have done... lol

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/hg0ds5.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/8k6eyy.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: canuck750 on October 31, 2019, 08:33:02 PM
Your Convert looks like its in pretty nice shape, I think they are very cool!

Nice find :thumb:
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: moto-uno on November 01, 2019, 11:13:38 AM
  As often as I've heard criticism about the square slide carbs , my personal experience was rather positive !
  Good all round carbs , perhaps a bit small for performance applications on a 950cc motor , but we didn't buy
  a convert for high performance !  Peter
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 01, 2019, 11:54:27 AM
Your Convert looks like its in pretty nice shape, I think they are very cool!

Nice find :thumb:

I am excited to get her going, slow and steady progress... seems to have real good bones.  Fortunately no signs of leaks from the troublesome ATF lines. 
I like the rejuvenation process on Tontis.


Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 01, 2019, 12:04:54 PM
  As often as I've heard criticism about the square slide carbs , my personal experience was rather positive !
  Good all round carbs , perhaps a bit small for performance applications on a 950cc motor , but we didn't buy
  a convert for high performance !  Peter

Hey Peter,
They should be fine, you are correct, this is no powerhouse engine.  A previous owner had changed the Mains to 125 from 112 and retained the stock airbox, perhaps in an attempt to "make" more power.

Oddly enough I have been hashing over whether to keep that stock box or go with the K&N pods or even the dual K&N which would have bumped up the Mains...  I have been going over Guzziology to try and figure out which way to go.

Brembo calipers next.   :wink:

Best,
Rob





Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 01, 2019, 07:23:48 PM
Well I was able to coax the carb slides to move with the help of this stuff... Man, gummed up. It has been sitting since before the days of ethanol fuel so it is merely lacquered instead of what ever happens nowadays.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/GK1ePt.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/923/e92PWB.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/y9PQyf.jpg)

So opened the carbs to clean them up and check the specs against Guzziology... Ha. Not yet. 

Nice huh...?

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/5UdDbX.jpg)

This residue wipes off easily so an ultrasonic bath should clean things up nicely.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/ftccxr.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/03UZ5h.jpg)

This brilliant design will go away, replaced by dual spigot banjos on the carbs and a single cross over to each bowl.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/mEg9QZ.jpg)

I enjoy rebuilding Dellortos…

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 01, 2019, 07:29:15 PM

The first carb cleaning session in the ultrasonic.

I use a mild mixture of Purple Power and water at about 50 Celsius. (122-ish Fahrenheit.) Most impressed with the bowl and carb body results, I will run the small parts separately 'cause the solution needs changing, kinda filthy.

Before...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/HHeAtg.jpg)

After...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/1BkRpY.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 02, 2019, 09:37:11 AM

So while we are on the intake side of things...

The stock air filter and housing are in place, miraculously no rodents or traces there of. I am actually a fan of stock airboxes, still air to be introduced to the intake, reasonably free of dirt and moisture however, I really do not like the design of the mid 70's airbox. Ridiculous to get at to change the filter element.

Thinking seriously about swapping for the dual mount K & N filter. It sort of replicates the structure of the stock intake box, attaches to both carbs.

But, and this is a big but... rejetting may be required to suit the different filter. Plus, and this is the big one, the crankcase breather system will need to be addressed. Easy enough by installing the LeMans breather box and pipe the valve cover vents to it... I'll figure it out but again, still on the fence.

In a preliminary inspection of the carb innards, I find that the Main Jets are 125 vs 130 called for stock, according to Guzziology. After all bits are cleaned I will check the specs to see what else may have been swapped.

Always an adventure when following others with no documentation, part of the fun.

More later,

rad

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/HBMWdk.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 08, 2019, 04:45:22 PM

Parts are ordered for the carbs, new cables and air filters, fuel taps, lines etc...

So I pulled the calipers off to inspect them for needs. When I picked up the V1000 the front calipers were unbolted from their carriers, not taken completely off the Convert, just hanging so the thing would roll around, probably because they were frozen.

They were also stripped of E.v.e.r.y thing, pads, caps, pins and all that. I picture all the parts on someone's bench.

I started looking at the parts required to completely rebuild the calipers and after adding them up it I discovered the replacement Brembo F08 calipers, all dressed with pads and ready to bolt on for less money...New, bolt them on. I ordered two for the front and I will refurbish the rear.
After much consternation and a chat with the good folks here, the decision to replace with new single bleeder replacements was the way to go, for me. 

The dual bleeder original calipers are in good condition, no stripped threads however, in need of all other components.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/8Zdwm6.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/vWBdDh.jpg)

The rear F08 caliper pistons appear to have no corrosion as compared to the front units and should pop outta there easily. He said. Stay tuned.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/61OpZm.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 10, 2019, 06:04:06 PM
That is coming along nicely and at a fast pace.
I have that 1000 jetting arriving in the mail next week (My bike came with super small bore Cigars with 145 mains @ 850 cc ) to suit the bigger 950 kit.

The Brembo 08's on Ducati's could be a little wooden even with aggressive pads, back in the 1990's I was doing who knows what on my 900SD and the front brake would not bleed properly (and was going for a ride the next day)
I had a GSXR 1100 master cylinder on hand and ended up getting it to bolt up with the thought that will do (I gave no thought to the bore diameter)  until I can get a kit for the Brembo M/C.


The project is not coming along that fast really and it will slow down while rebuilding the carbs and calipers...

I have read often about the differences in master cylinder size and the calipers, not yet tried a mod such as this however, I am not opposed to it.

rad__

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 10, 2019, 06:09:32 PM

Rear caliper… I took the chance that what I could see of the rear caliper pistons were good and did not order a new replacement for that one, good call, ok, lucky call.

When I took it apart sure enough the Brembo F08 contains the anodized aluminum pistons and good seals. I will replace the seals anyway but really excited about the pistons.


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/fhllpU.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/KoaXO3.jpg)



Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 10, 2019, 06:49:06 PM
Rear caliper… I took the chance that what I could see of the rear caliper pistons were good and did not order a new replacement for that one, good call, ok, lucky call.

When I took it apart sure enough the Brembo F08 contains the anodized aluminum pistons and good seals. I will replace the seals anyway but really excited about the pistons.


IIRC, any/all F08s with a single bleeder also have the anodized alloy pistons. Both happened during the same revision.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 10, 2019, 07:11:31 PM
IIRC, any/all F08s with a single bleeder also have the anodized alloy pistons. Both happened during the same revision.

Interesting...  I was going to ask if you knew when they started in with the updated pistons. 

This thing has not been registered sine '91, I find it hard to believe that someone would bother to install a newer caliper if it were not on the road...  :undecided:

Little confused albeit grateful here.

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Groover on November 11, 2019, 04:48:49 PM
Looking really good. I opted to keep the stock Air filter setup on my G5, mostly because mine (an '81) has the rubber intake elbows and the stock air box provides great support for the carbs. On yours, seems you could go either way. I'd probably make that decision based on the road types you typically ride. If not a lot of country roads, it could take a good while till you need to worry about replacing the air filter - that's just my opinion on that.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 12, 2019, 04:04:24 PM
Looking really good. I opted to keep the stock Air filter setup on my G5, mostly because mine (an '81) has the rubber intake elbows and the stock air box provides great support for the carbs. On yours, seems you could go either way. I'd probably make that decision based on the road types you typically ride. If not a lot of country roads, it could take a good while till you need to worry about replacing the air filter - that's just my opinion on that.

Right, with the rubber intakes there should be some additional support, I did that on my Son's CX years ago. 

The K &Ns should work fine, I'll keep them cleaned and oiled.

rad__
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 12, 2019, 04:05:40 PM

The first batch of parts arrived from MG Cycle. There will be more and I am working on that list now.

So this is what new Brembo calipers look like... who knew...?


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/RNbqkS.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/ALmp1Z.jpg)
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 15, 2019, 05:23:03 PM

Carb kits, fuel taps and lines, dual banjos, filters, breather box, valve cover vent lines...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/OogRDD.jpg)
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Pescatore on November 16, 2019, 12:05:46 PM
Will the dual banjos work on any bike with the cross hoses, like a V65?
I need to fix a leak on mine, but looks like
I could replace it altogether.
And... makes replacing the air filter easier.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 16, 2019, 07:17:26 PM
Will the dual banjos work on any bike with the cross hoses, like a V65?
I need to fix a leak on mine, but looks like
I could replace it altogether.
And... makes replacing the air filter easier.


Yes, the dual banjos eliminate that silly cross over with four separate hoses and eight clamps.   :rolleyes:

One side of the banjo connects the two carbs together, I like to run that connection in a nice, gentle sweeping arc to each other and the other side simply connects to the fuel tank feed from the fuel taps.  Done.

I use the 7mm rubber fuel hose with cloth covering along with the dual banjos, no clamps for carbed engines... kid you not.

BTW, yes, I did the same on my V65.

Best,
Rob



Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 19, 2019, 04:19:55 PM

More carb cleaning... Hey, I've been busy.
 
The left instrument seems to be more chock-full-o-crap than the right.  A good soak in the ultrasonic cleaner should make this all good.

Check out the inlet filter, years of sitting but worse, indications of possible tank sediment, I guess.  Compare to the new screens. 

The poor thing is so gunked up that I could not coax the bowl off, again, soak and try it later.  The pumper assembly was good and gummed up and stuck as well. More later, tomorrow should finish up the carbs.  Should...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/4Osoae.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/LqlwSK.jpg)


Ok, all good, the carbs cleaned up well, new kits for gaskets, O-Rings and float needles. Not too bad for having sat up for years...


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/923/nA8pSM.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/923/pOCRLE.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/923/JmxSB4.jpg)
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 26, 2019, 09:03:12 AM

I am hopping around doing this and that so there is no continuity here... sorry.

The rest of the required parts for the first wave of installs. I had omitted a few small items and as I got to looking around MG Cycle's website of course I added this and that. It happens, I'm helpless to stop it.

The banjo bolts and sealing washers were a must, the ignition cover, rubber bumpers for the tank, new plug caps, a few gaskets, vent line clamps, one more caliper seal kit for the rear F08, Frentubo stainless braided oil feed line and I added the sump spacer... just because. Luckily I happened to have a spare, correct length dipstick to suit the sump spacer.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/w8M1ts.jpg)

Doing a little corrosion control. Rust just drives me nuts, I know it is a short ride...

The battery tray was in sad condition, just rusty and paint scaling but still.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/1JghOz.jpg)

So a quick sanding and spray bomb flat black to coat it. New stainless bolts, washers and lock nuts, one of the securing points holds the main ground wire, corrosion control. ;)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/3EKCdn.jpg)

Besides, it will be mostly hidden with the rubber mat on it..

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/921/IGiRHw.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 27, 2019, 08:52:20 AM
Oil pan...

this might get a tad boring as I have several images showing the sequence of assembling the pan with the sump spacer, filter, screen and gaskets. I decided to install a sump spacer to the older engine. The intent of the sump spacer is not to increase the oil amount in the pan rather it is used for lowering the level of the oil away from the spinning crank which would in turn cause oil foaming and large amounts of misting and pressure that would then find a way to leak, usually out through the crankcase vent system. The retention of the PCV is paramount also.

Anyway, this will aid in reducing or eliminating the oil misting issue. The sump spacer adds another gasket as well as longer pan securing bolts.

We'll start with the pan removal and showing how that old oil looked in it...! Wow.  Sat for twenty-eight (28) years as far as I know.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/vpW3F1.jpg)

The good news is that it cleaned up well.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/JtIGqH.jpg)

A word about the hose clamp on the oil filter... Some years ago, on this very forum I heard of an oil filter working its way loose and really messing up an engine. Ahh, just a fluke surely. Then I heard of a few more. The DIY fix...? Secure a hose clamp onto the filter and keep the worm gear lug nice and tight onto the relief valve to prevent the filter from spinning off, just in case.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/KVZGjO.jpg)

The next step is to start assembling the entire pan and spacer assembly to ready for install onto the engine. I like to use a very thin smear of grease on the flanges to help seal the gaskets and to help them not bake onto the engine making removal difficult.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/rzZbbk.jpg)

Place the gasket and grease the top of that prior to setting the spacer on...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/922/gEvzfH.jpg)

Spacer on, repeat the grease application to the top of the spacer for the next gasket...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/923/bs4doj.jpg)

Another gasket...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/oV8yFo.jpg)

And this is your basic oil pan and sump spacer sammich ready to go back onto the engine…

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/1024x768q90/924/ANzttX.jpg)

Tomorrow I'll show you the cool rig I use to introduce this entire assembly to the engine for bolting, it can be a bit unruly if just hand held. You gotta hold yer tongue just right...

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: usedtobefast on November 27, 2019, 11:28:22 AM
Thanks for posting all this up! 

My list of ToDos for my Quota is growing at about the same pace as my laziness!  :grin:  Reading threads like this motivates me to get to work in the garage. 
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 27, 2019, 09:17:03 PM
Thanks for posting all this up! 

My list of ToDos for my Quota is growing at about the same pace as my laziness!  :grin:  Reading threads like this motivates me to get to work in the garage.

Sure thing, so get to it.  Hopefully the Quota will not need all that the Covert does, prolly not been sitting as long.  :wink:


Oil pan assembled and installed.

So with the pan, sump spacer and gaskets all readied the next step is to hold it with one hand, raise the assembly up to meet the bottom flange of the engine and start threading the 6mm bolts up into their respective threaded holes. This can be quite the balancing act.

I figured out a long time ago that the scissors lift is a labor saver and a good aid in alignment and installation of the pan.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/2WPwKY.jpg)

Just lay it on top and crank the platform up to meet the bottom of the engine and start threading the new bolts in...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/LEhEF4.jpg)

Yes, that is an old SP1000 mirror...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/bh2dyf.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/xlWLML.jpg)

More later,
rad___



Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Groover on November 27, 2019, 10:59:47 PM
Looking great, and I'm really digging your photography work. Good camera, good angles? Maybe both, but it's good!
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on November 29, 2019, 08:40:42 PM
Looking great, and I'm really digging your photography work. Good camera, good angles? Maybe both, but it's good!

Thanks, actually progressing slowly due to other responsibilities and family commitments for now. 

I shoot a lot , these are mostly with the small Nikon P510, fairly old now but easy to use, the rear screen articulates to be able to use it in tight and at odd angles.  I use the D7200 for images that need manual, selective focus shots, items that are in a crowded area that the small camera will not do, the auto focus gets confused…

More soon.
rad__



Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 04, 2019, 07:10:15 PM

Man, the family gathering stuff really puts a damper on wrench time, I have not been on the Guzzi for a week, all worth it for sure.

Against my better judgement I actually decided to replace the oil feed line to the heads. I say against that judgement because even though the lines "look" fine, fittings are dry, no signs of seeping or leaks this thing has not run for some time and the very last thing I would want to have happen is have that line blow at start up or soon after.
Plus, with the added lines of the Convert, the area to get at the fitting down between the cylinders is pretty crowded, better to do it now.

So, before I install the breather box, vent lines, carbs and filters, new steel braided line coming up.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/EcfNdl.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/YXKdBc.jpg)

New oil feed lines and sealing washers. As soon as I clean the existing valve covers they will have new vent lines as well.
I hesitate to even polish the covers, rather just an ultrasonic cleaning to ensure that they are free of contaminants prior to going on with new lines and gaskets...

This goes along with the decision to Not restore the Convert. One of my favorite quotes from a Peter Egan story talks to not doing a restoration for many reasons and if I get to doing a little of this and a little of that I may jump in and completely restore the thing.

I paraphrase Peter regarding an MGB project that he was doing:

'One night on a strange mixture of French roast coffee and Guinness I accidently took the entire car apart'

That and another quote talks about how deep one can get into a project in respect to cost which we can all relate, especially if the end goal is for resale of the project:

Again, in this case an MGB...'After completion of a Compete and total restoration, I now have the finest $8000.00 MGB that $12,000.00 can buy.'

We all know that costs can go to an entirely unexpected level. Easy to do...

New Frentubo stainless braided line, banjo bolts and seals...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/ZA0kve.jpg)

Old and new...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/l8wbGu.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/yiQi3T.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/88o737.jpg)

The center banjo bolt, between the cylinders on the top of the engine block is a genuine pain in the butt to get at, the only bolt that, after breaking it loose, did not spin out by hand, I needed to turn that one out flat by flat... figures. lol

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/TGmgBL.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Rick4003 on December 06, 2019, 07:45:17 AM
Looking good.

And good idea changing the hose. I left mine on as it was a braided steel hose that looked good. It fell of on the right side. I only noticed it because there was a little oil splatter on the right carb.  :shocked: Will definitely fit a new better quality one this winter.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 10, 2019, 08:22:05 PM

I had a few minutes between errands and other life responsibilities to start assembling the breather box with new stubby little hoses and clamps. I cannot get that kink out of the thin walled vent hose to save me.  I may even attach a short piece of copper pipe to the spigot on the breather and then run the hose down... maybe.

Only one side valve cover breather hose is on in this shot, I am contemplating having the covers vapor blasted and hope to Hell that it will not lead to further "Restoration". The covers clean up fairly well however, the deep dinginess is a bit bothersome. I'll figure it out.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/922/xEe6ec.jpg)

Edit:

On the advice of a fellow Guzziphile, I installed a spring in the hose and no kink.  Love it.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/zFXxpS.jpg)


Right side vent hose...

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/923/Ibzz3u.jpg)


Choke assemblies...


When I took the carbs down for cleaning and rebuild I noticed that one of the choke valve caps was broken along the O-Ring sealing area. I went down to the stash-o-stuff set aside for the T-3/SP project and stole one from that. If I need to submit another order for more parts I may just replace the dual cable set up for individual flip type levers...

As found...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/zw3nVq.jpg)

Should be...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/g19cH7.jpg)


Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Pescatore on December 10, 2019, 10:29:09 PM
Clever spring idea. Love it!
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 13, 2019, 06:15:21 PM

Checking valve clearances before putting the covers back on with new gaskets.

I usually pull the plugs and use the rear wheel with the gearbox in top gear to rotate the engine, cycle on the center stand to find TDC however, this time I decided to simply turn the by way of the rotor securing bolt.

Good thing I went this way... In pulling the alternator cover off I discovered a broken bolt lug. Bummer.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/DnAiiC.jpg)

I have another cover to use so it's not a big ta-do although this one has been on the wall of the garage for years, I'll look for another on the SP or T-3.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/PVbmnc.jpg)

I found this handy Tee type tool years ago by a now defunct outfit that made them, makes holding the tappet adjuster stud very easy and precise.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/d5uaVk.jpg)

Find TDC for the left cylinder by rotating the assembly around to the "S" mark on the flywheel, check that both valves are closed on the compression stroke and check/adjust as needed. "D" mark for the right cylinder. 

Valve clearances are set at .009" / .229 mm and they are spot on.  Rocker shafts seem fine although I did not pull them to measure.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/Zf4IBa.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/ReAgaY.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/Kj35O1.jpg)

The good news is that the alternator, rotor and related connectors appear to be in good condition.
 
I'll add the cover spacer used on later models which is located behind it, the spacer allows for additional air flow to help keep the engine mounted rotor relatively cool.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/Y9yIyf.jpg)

More later...
rad__


Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 14, 2019, 07:33:34 PM
So yes, I know I jump around like a fart I a frying pan, I'm on the spectrum...  :shocked:

I decided to go ahead and order a few more parts; replacing the dual choke assembly with the individual flip style chokes and after talking with Charlie Mullendore.  The original mounting spot which is a bracket on the top/right, left side valve cover bolt is really just plain in the way. 
That location has, in the past caused issues on other Guzzis including chafing on the tank, silly design in my estimation.

Also adding the air spacer for the alternator cover and a couple of other bits etc...

As a side note, if I were doing a full or even partial restoration, I would have attacked the systems individually, assessed needs and placed one large order for all parts. This way, as I bounce around I end up paying for more shipping but hey, it happens.

In the meantime, I went back to the brake system. The rear F08 needed a seal kit, well, I think it did so I have one, might as well use it.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/e4MbCR.jpg)

During tear down I had noticed that the rear caliper already had the updated pistons so I ordered just the seal kit. Taking the seals out of the bores show the seals looking fine but again, renewed.

Seals in with the pistons...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/dOF8Z7.jpg)

Dust boots and O-ring in place...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/CJPpUp.jpg)

Bolted up...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/2zziYO.jpg)

Insert the pads and pins...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/i9qTQg.jpg)

In place...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/8azzPk.jpg)

While we are on the rear brake... this is a odd little rig, parking brake which is set when the side stand is deployed via a cable. Pretty cool really and fully functional, adjuster as well.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/ZXmsn0.jpg)

Side stand lug prior to setting the brake...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/LHIIAV.jpg)

And with the weight of the motorcycle on the stand... brake set.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/5sW4bm.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 20, 2019, 07:23:21 PM
I just did some little things today, new plug caps, some cleaning, made notes for the missing brake caliper bolts, pulled the rear rack off that I don't want to use, investigated the mounting and wiring for the forward directionals etc.

For some unexplained reason I actually tried some naval jelly on the lightly rusted surfaces, some chrome cleaned up well however, the canisters might get the flat black high heat treatment, we'll see.Old plug caps. I have never liked these, early in the 80's I had my first SP 1000 and the metal plug caps were a constant issue so ever since then I have replaced them with the NGK plastic caps, installed new with dielectric grease for the rubber boots.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/voybe6.jpg)

New NGKs...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/WlTy7U.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/Pml51a.jpg)

While waiting on the new manifold gaskets, flip type choke assemblies and the alternator spacer with bolts I did a test fit for the carb this afternoon. Due to the new K&N filters, just wanted to make certain of the clearances with no surprises. All good, I can run the new cables, new fuel lines and bolt the carbs and manifolds on. The little chrome thingys are the support guides for the plug wires that will bolt to the lower manifold securing bolt.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/3JDV2G.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/kkK1hU.jpg)

The small parts showed up via late day FedEx delivery... easy bolt up in the morning with coffee.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/1u1ryJ.jpg)

Getting back to the 'Vert after moving a bit of snow and a trip North... busy time of year.

Alternator cover fitted with the spacers and new stainless bolts...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/NQwLRW.jpg)

Test fit for the carbs, manifolds with new gaskets and with the tank in place to route the fuel lines including the dual spigot banjos. I'll install the cables tomorrow and use a remote tank to start the V1000.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/75LmUR.jpg)

In the lower shot you can see a small dent in the tank just forward of the fuel tap which was caused by the stock dual choke lever mount. The bracket attaches to an upper valve cover bolt and the tank settles down onto the "L" shaped bracket chafing and scratching or worse, glad to have it gone.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/2AKwwJ.jpg)


Well she runs but you're gonna have to take my word for it.

I installed the new throttle cables, set up the remote tank and fuel lines and touched her off... so to speak. No leaks, no smoke, no sputtering, no bad noises but Revs were way too high.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/SYTacU.jpg)


I got to looking at the cable adjusters, no problems at the throttle however, the carb tops were adjusted too high.

For a minute there I was wondering if the carb tops should not have adjusters, a PO had them set high and now it idles. Well, did.

So as I looked around for the reason or reasons for the high rev she was started several times and the became reluctant to participate finally came to say, "I'm done"
I get a click click, click from the starter relay. Not certain if the relay is the issue or the tin foil, piece of crap stock started switch assembly. Battery is up.

These components are forty-three (43) years old and have sat unused for twenty-eight (28) so corrosion Could be an issue.

I pulled all the connectors off the relay to hopefully reestablish contact but she ain't havin' it. As I recall though the relay has an adjustment coil in it, I could be mistaken, I'll pop it off tomorrow and have a look.

In a more bizarre situation, I have not been able to find a replacement relay, P/N 12 73 25 00, so far I have only checked one supplier that is usually well stocked.  Some folks on eBay list a relay and show a picture of a regulator... come on peeps.

Anyway, I'll continue to trouble shoot and hope that it actually is that relay and I can find one, the bar mounted switch is not a fun exercise to replace. I have done these on a T-3 and CX LeMans so the task is not out of the question, just time consuming matching wires and all.

In general though, wicked pleased to hear it run, one never knows if you are bringing home a pig in a poke or not Loves me some Tonti Guzzi sounds.

Post start up...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/Xidv0A.jpg)

El-crapo starter switch...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/RoHISf.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on December 21, 2019, 08:33:57 AM
Relay: something like this:
https://www.autozone.com/electrical-and-lighting/relay-and-resistors/novita-40-amp-spst-accessory-replay/849394_0_0
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Burkslaw on December 21, 2019, 08:50:03 AM
This thread is a great motivator! Thank you for all the details/photos. I'm heading out to wheel my old R/100 from garden shed to garage to start the rehabilitation during Christmas vacation.
Fortunately, both of my Guzzi's are up and running properly.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 21, 2019, 06:29:48 PM

This thread is a great motivator! Thank you for all the details/photos. I'm heading out to wheel my old R/100 from garden shed to garage to start the rehabilitation during Christmas vacation.
Fortunately, both of my Guzzi's are up and running properly.


An R/100 huh...?  Cool. what year...?  So get to it.  We will need progress reports.   :wink:

rad__

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 21, 2019, 06:33:29 PM

Relay: something like this:
https://www.autozone.com/electrical-and-lighting/relay-and-resistors/novita-40-amp-spst-accessory-replay/849394_0_0


Yes indeed, it was the relay.

Thanks Charlie,
Rob

Running, first time in twenty-eight years...! 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ho9CmTUq9Z0


Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: ozarquebus on December 22, 2019, 06:05:09 PM
Hooray! Sounds good!
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: wirespokes on December 22, 2019, 11:50:23 PM
Just a note on something I discovered. My 77 T3 came to me with the K&N filters and they didn't want to mount very well. The threaded section they mount to isn't but a 1/4" or 3/8. The clamp is wider. The end of the filter where it clamped had shrunk due to the clamp, so it just didn't fit well.

i had a set of tubes that thread onto the carbs that were probably part of the original airbox setup. With those installed, the filters clamped on nicely and I discovered the bike ran much better. The filters still mounted close to the carb so nothing much had changed there, but the intake tract evidently needed that extra length.

You might check that out.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on December 23, 2019, 07:06:25 PM

Just a note on something I discovered. My 77 T3 came to me with the K&N filters and they didn't want to mount very well. The threaded section they mount to isn't but a 1/4" or 3/8. The clamp is wider. The end of the filter where it clamped had shrunk due to the clamp, so it just didn't fit well.

i had a set of tubes that thread onto the carbs that were probably part of the original airbox setup. With those installed, the filters clamped on nicely and I discovered the bike ran much better. The filters still mounted close to the carb so nothing much had changed there, but the intake tract evidently needed that extra length.

You might check that out.


Correct, I had grappled with which way to go when I decided to use the K&Ns.  The velocity stacks are employed here with the correct size filters.

Thanks,
Rob

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/924/Lmo5cf.jpg)


(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/923/JmxSB4.jpg)





Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on January 12, 2020, 08:49:12 PM

A little more progress...  Lots going on up here in the Great White North, we move snow around just for the heck of it.   :rolleyes:

I had experienced a relay giving up the ghost after that many years sitting.

New replacement relay in position, I had removed the rear master cylinder to pull out the old relay and accurately identify where each wire connected.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/923/r8Zymf.jpg)

Final Drive Unit...

The Final Drive was the typical oily, greasy mess. Drained the fluid which amounted to the requisite 250-ish cc of some kind of oil, at least it was not water... I flushed the housing with a healthy dose of 80W-90 synthetic gear oil that I happened to have on the shelf, spun the assembly by hand and will add 250 cc of 80W-90 going back in.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/923/vP4J5K.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/922/JbErNN.jpg)

Cleaned up ok, I cannot get the right hand canister off so this is as clean as it will get unless I saw the mufflers off.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/921/mvO3aZ.jpg)


(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/921/TyAeQ2.jpg)

29/Gearbox and ATF fluid change...

To heat the gearbox oil for draining that has sat for who knows how long, I set up the V1000 with a roller for the rear wheel while running the engine so as to be able to spin the trans to warm it slightly to drain the gear oil.

The reason for setting the wheel down onto the roller is to reduce any strain on the Cardan Joint (Double U-joint) vs letting it hang with the motorcycle on the center stand. This more closely replicates the road condition of riding on the road.

Just a short time on the roller warmed the gear oil for draining. I ran the rear wheel at about 10-15 miles per hour for a total of about four miles. Drained and flushed the gearbox with more 80W-90 to give the bearings and shafts and nice healthy bath of fresh fluid and topped up the gearbox to the proper level. 

Strange little gearbox also, less volume that the conventional five speed boxes, 600cc of gear oil vs 750 and no level plug. 

I have yet to decide that to do about the ATF in the torque converter, lines and cooler. I may need to drain that and flush as well, thinking that new fluid is batter than the old stuff but I may need to wait until it is on the road. I would like to be assured that the flush will indeed replace all of the old fluid but I just don't know if I can completely flush the system, a good effort is better than nothing.

Rear wheel in the rollers...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/lFvEFJ.jpg)

Spinning...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/T0DxYX.jpg)


I am working on a Triumph Bonneville concurrent to this rig.  Fun to have progress on one or the other almost continually. 

The Guzzi got a new Odyssey PC-680 Battery and it sits in the vast area meant for a big-a$$ juice battery, I have one 3/4" shim on one side and going to use thick, dense foam on the other side to stabilize the battery.  I was please also that the stock securing straps work well with the new battery.   
I also stick a Battery Tender loop on everything I own.  

On the electrical subject I May install the EME EnDuraLast 450 Watt Charging System on the old boot but that is really getting ahead of things. I have installed these in two other Guzzis and Man, the accessory load is amazing. Heated gear and aux lights, no issues at all. Again, Maybe...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/5MNFFr.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on January 26, 2020, 09:54:40 PM
Before I can put the tank back on I needed to be certain of the electrical items that need sorting that may access under there. I am actually quite impressed with the condition of the wiring harness in general, glad to see that it has not been hacked up..

Front directionals are all set.

I had to trace a bit of wiring modification due to the Vetter installation. Long story made thankfully short for you, the color codes do Not stay constant from OEM wiring harnesses to aftermarket equipment. The interface from the main harness to the fairing is pretty well done though. These were on the rear of the Guzzi, mounted on the rear rack that has been removed. I like them up front.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/rf1MJH.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/xzQCVN.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/cq8BBR.jpg)

With the front signals all set I need to find a set to use out back. All of the Lucas units that I have in the parts stash are in need of either gaskets, lenses, some wiring or repair of some type so I Flea-bay'd a set of Lucas knock-offs complete and reasonably priced.

I will make up a mounting bracket to suit the clearance of the side cases.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/RmAs81.jpg)

The "Driving lights" that were on the fairing are leaving, they are huge, old style sealed beam type lights and were in the way of the signals, I could just hang them off the bottom of the mounts, they are kinda neat but I will use a set of smaller LED units. 

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/MxXgEg.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/ETwPpO.jpg)

The angle bar mounts that must have been fabbed by a bridge builder, 1/4" angle and flat bar incorporated into the Vetter platform, a bit of overkill.  I'll cut them back to a decent size for the replacement lights.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/NlLTg4.jpg)


The directionals arrived, actually too nice to put on this old boot... The stem thread ended up as 7/16" - 20, I bought two new lock nuts so that when I make a bracket for them I can secure them on both sides of the bracket.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/qROujM.jpg)

Rear directionals...

The seemingly never ending saga of the rear directionals... and moving snow...!

These things have had me scratchin' me 'ead over just how to mount them. The biggest issue was that the directionals that had been mounted on the rear were moved to the front because I eliminated that rear rack that they were bolted to. Plus I like the look of them in front.
Another issue is that the Convert does not have the standard Lunchbox style cases so the stock Convert signal brackets May not clear the Samsonite cases.

So, I came up with a plan to attach the signal stalks to the rear of the plate bracket. I welded a pair of machine collars onto the bracket, ground a flat on the OD radius for stability, aligned with a 7/16" diameter rod to hopefully keep them in alignment, clamped in place then welded to the bracket. Boom. Worked pretty well. Painted flat black and replaced the steel set screws with brass.
 

Stems locked into place with a set screw and nut, I used the Schnorr type lock washers also.
(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/924/qAOARr.jpg)


(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/922/Xgig8n.jpg)

Mounted...

On a side note, that plate light assembly is a tricky little bugger to get into for changing bulbs... wow...!

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/922/X1gjcs.jpg)

And they clear the side cases...

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/921/nHxtAX.jpg)

In my stash of old plates found a '74 plate with a '76 registration tag on it, in this state one can use a "Year of Issue" plate however, that might be pushing it in that it only has the tag. I may just go Antique, Historic in some states.

I'm going to saw off those giant light brackets up front next and mount the new LED running lights.  Then I can get back to mechanical items, bleeding brakes soon.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: canuck750 on January 27, 2020, 10:14:33 AM
 :thumb:
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on January 29, 2020, 10:48:12 AM

Back to some mechanical items...

Rear parking brake...

This is an unusual however, pretty effective little device, bolts on behind the rear caliper and activated via cable when the side stand is deployed.

The "Pucks" are adjusted for bite onto the rear rotor by way of the Allen set screws in both sides of the housings. I removed it to service and lubricate the moving parts and to ensure that it works properly.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/922/j24AAM.jpg)

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/923/HvWr8x.jpg)

Bleeding the linked brakes; apply the pressure to the right side foot brake pedal and the front/left and rear calipers are activated... as most of you already know.

I do not recall having the bleeding go so well in recent or even not so recent history.  My lovely assistant Sue Ellen doing the brake pedal work while I release the air from the fluid at the calipers. When the pedal became firm I lifted the rear and set the Guzzi onto the centerstand, spun the rear wheel and hit the brake pedal, stopped the wheel. Excellent.  :thumb:

We will go through the entire process again to gain all that we can but, so far, so good.

I had forgotten to order a front master cylinder rebuild kit so I'll get that heading this way and do that caliper later.


(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/924/OaiL9O.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on January 30, 2020, 10:00:52 AM

Front master cylinder...

For some odd reason I had neglected to order a master cylinder rebuild kit with the first round of parts, possibly thinking that I had one on the shelf... no go. Luckily I can rebuild this one in situ, I would not want to disturb the right side switch, it works... !  :thumb:

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/924/y0LOOM.jpg)

This guy was pretty gummy and crappy inside, old fluid etc... it will clean up well.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/924/eUUBUB.jpg)

Small wonder the plunger was stuck in the bore huh...?

These are not a big ta-do for renewing, I use the correct sized deep socket to drive the lock ring with the seal an washer into the bore which looks good.

(http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640x480q90/922/rfvvyv.jpg)

More later,
rad__



Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on January 31, 2020, 11:46:24 AM
Brake bleeding tool...

The rear brake on the big twins has always been an odd thing to get at for bleeding with a straight wrench, for me.

So as not to break up a set of existing wrenches in the garage, I bought a new Craftsman 11MM wrench, heated and formed it to a very useful arc. Works well for a full stroke when bleeding the calipers.

At first I was disappointed to find a twelve point vs a six point however, this actually worked out much better for positioning. The fitting is new and not frozen or tight so, we're good.

Open...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/cpEsRG.jpg)

Closed...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/vT29Jr.jpg)


More later,
rad__

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on February 04, 2020, 06:39:59 AM
Front master cylinder rebuild...

Which is really not much of a rebuild, the kit consists of a new plunger, O-Rings, washer, seal, lock ring & spring.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/B0ixyt.jpg)

Disassembly is straight forward, pull the banjo bolt on the outlet, drive the plunger assembly out with a small diameter punch.  Clean the bore as best you can, install new plunger. 

I like to use the proper size socket to drive the new assembly into the bore of the master.  I pulled out the 1/4" drive 13MM deep socket and the 3/8" drive 13MM deep socket and the best fit is the 3/8" drive.
The diameter allows the socket to press the lock ring into the bore completely, the larger diameter 1/4" drive socket would have stopped shy of seating the plunger assembly.

FYI. Mic the OD of the driver that you choose.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/OjGrwK.jpg)

Coat the assembled plunger with O-Rings with the Brembo assembly grease, wipe off excess prior to going into the bore.
 
(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/qbwkfP.jpg)

Slide the plunger into the master cylinder bore, the first O-Ring will offer some initial resistance and quickly give up with slight pressure.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/320x240q90/922/mnKm2h.jpg)

Follow that up with the driver to seat the seal and lock ring, shown here by tapping the driver in with a brass drift and hammer.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/dK0OoU.jpg)

I decided to replace the reservoir cylinder cup and rubber bellows just to do it, retaining the original Brembo cap, no idea why...

New sealing washers on the banjo bolt.

The brake lever has great action, bleeding tomorrow...

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/MQgxlZ.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: SED on February 04, 2020, 10:24:24 PM
Looks great Rad.  Like the details.  Careful and thorough work.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on February 07, 2020, 02:57:25 PM
Replacement driving lights...

The huge aftermarket driving lights that were on the Convert when it came here had to go, old style sealed beams and giant angle bar brackets. Just wow.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/Fs8V59.jpg)


I cut down the existing brackets to suit the new LED lights, tucked them in about 6" closer and mounted them under the brackets. All lights work, brake lights even the side marker lights mounted on the Vetter. Pretty cool.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/DcuyU4.jpg)

They are more for the visibility of he motorcycle by others on the road than actual driving lights however, the wiring was there and what the hey... A night time ride will tell whether they are good for poaching deer or not.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/43Qrcy.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/KQay3c.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/PDcPZJ.jpg)

I am running out of stuff to do it really, she runs, fluids have been changed, needed accessory repairs have been made, additions are done. I will need a road test to determine how the brakes turned out. After that, if it proves to be worthy of tires then we'll go from there. I'll do a leak test on the tank prior to mounting it back onto the frame, install the seat and wait for Spring.

More later,
rad__
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on February 10, 2020, 07:39:40 PM
Painted parts...

So in that this project is, as described a refresh and not a restoration the painted part have come into question. The poor guy has a bit of a patina although the paint is actually not too bad, what to do.

Well one thing fer sure I ain't gonna paint it.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/Syujfc.jpg)

I had used some naval jelly on some of the red chrome just to try it out and that turned out decent. Turning to the lightly pitted and rusty side covers, I coated one with the jelly, let it sit for about fifteen minutes and washed it off. The jelly did not harm the paint at all.

The next dilemma was whether to polish the parts or just which way to go. I think I will clear coat the painted parts right over the areas that is missing paint, it's all the rage with the hot rod guys...!

This left side cover looked just like the right side cover in the lead photo before the naval jelly and wash. The finished assembled motorcycle will have that general tatty appearance so I don't mind.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/YEWuaJ.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on February 19, 2020, 08:23:45 PM
Well I have gone as far as I had first planned to with the refresh on the Guzzi, I knew at the outset that this would not be a full restoration.

I need to do a final brake fluid bleed on the rear and front/left calipers, they are good but just to wrap it up and be certain.

Hoping to get a road test in within a month or so, we still have the rest of Winter to slog through... If she proves road worthy new tires and tubes will be in order. ;)

Thanks for playing along.

More later,
rad___

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/UDrS9f.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/9WVjIJ.jpg)


(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/QgCpba.jpg)
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: s1120 on February 21, 2020, 07:44:45 AM
Just a thought on the side covers...  Not really a "restore" but maybe find a auto touchup paint stick thats close and just touch up those little chips and scratches. Still fits into the "not restored" look, but covers them up, and makes them look "kept up on"..
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Canuck750 on February 21, 2020, 09:39:16 AM
Looks realy good, the right appearance for a preserved motorcycle. I agree with the suggestion to touch up the paint chips and then shoot a cover coat of semi gloss clear over the covers to protect them.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on February 21, 2020, 05:27:13 PM

s1120 & Canuck,
Yes, I have thought of doing the touch up paint thing and then clear coat, the problem is finding just the right shade of silver.  I also thought I might just shoot the covers black, even I could do that...  And I hate to paint, I'm not good at it.

Thanks or the feedback, really looking forward to riding the Vert.

Best,
Rob

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: s1120 on March 01, 2020, 08:45:41 AM
s1120 & Canuck,
Yes, I have thought of doing the touch up paint thing and then clear coat, the problem is finding just the right shade of silver.  I also thought I might just shoot the covers black, even I could do that...  And I hate to paint, I'm not good at it.

Thanks or the feedback, really looking forward to riding the Vert.

Best,
Rob

Go to a few car dealers. Todays cars come in MANY shades of silver and almost all car dealers will have a drawer full on diferent tuchup paints somewhere in parts. Bring a cover, and ask the parts guys. Most all parts guys would be willing to help with a cool project.. unless they are swamped... 
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on March 01, 2020, 08:53:54 AM
s1120 & Canuck,
Yes, I have thought of doing the touch up paint thing and then clear coat, the problem is finding just the right shade of silver.  I also thought I might just shoot the covers black, even I could do that...  And I hate to paint, I'm not good at it.

Thanks or the feedback, really looking forward to riding the Vert.

Best,
Rob

I was going to have the sidecovers painted on my Convert until I got a few quotes that were more than I wanted to spend. So, I dropped them off at the local powdercoater and he made them black for $50/pr. Not too glossy either, matches the tank well.

I wonder if you might find a matching silver in finger nail polish? I've heard of this being done for chipped red colored parts.
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on March 26, 2020, 05:38:31 PM

s1120 & Charlie,
I am just now seeing these posts. Good ideas for the touch up, I may end up painting the covers although the nail polish is a good thought too.
Thanks,
Rob


        =============================

First test ride...!

The Convert was taken down off the lift yesterday, the weather was Not conducive to a test ride, today we had a small batch Maple Syrup to do and with that done got a chance to get a blast in. For fear of sounding like a teenage Valley Girl Oh My Gawd… this thing is a riot. What the Hell took me so long to find these rigs...?

I tried both gear ranges, all good, handles well, brakes are perfect.

Just a nice docile, lumbering hulk of a motorcycle. I like it a great deal already...! I did not put the cases on, wanting to keep a close eye on stuff at first.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/fKrFve.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/922/gwwBMl.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/923/80Wzww.jpg)

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/921/hPwb5I.jpg)


Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on March 26, 2020, 07:35:09 PM
 :thumb: :thumb:
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: Dave Swanson on March 28, 2020, 01:14:38 AM
Excellent follow through!  Congratulations. 
Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: radguzzi on March 29, 2020, 08:59:49 AM
Excellent follow through!  Congratulations.

Thanks Dave,
As mentioned early on, this was not a restoration rather a refresh to treat the Convert as a rider. 

The old boot with the period Samsonite side cases. I like them, great capacity and fill up that back end nicely. I needed to adjust the rear directionals to work with no interference and they are tucked in tight but still very visible.

(https://imagizer.imageshack.com/v2/640x480q90/924/xMOL78.jpg)

Title: Re: '76 Moto Guzzi V1000 Convert refresh/reawakening after 28 years...!
Post by: baloo on March 23, 2021, 02:18:28 PM
I love those Samsonites and want to adapt them to my Tonti frame Mille GT.
Did you have to fabricate your own brackets for your bike?
Thanks.