Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

General Category => Bike Builds, Rebuilds And Restorations Only => Topic started by: canuck750 on October 19, 2018, 07:52:44 PM

Title: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 19, 2018, 07:52:44 PM
I bought a 1974 Benelli 650S Tornado a couple years ago, its a 'little rough' and has some 'patina'

(https://i.postimg.cc/3JXGfWGv/Dream-Cycle-Benelli-Tornado-Copy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/mtrhtL8L)

(https://i.postimg.cc/nrvXWwXJ/IMG-1085-Copy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/0Ky5MnGW)

(https://i.postimg.cc/vZGVJM7S/IMG-1086-Copy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/PPFJDgRm)

(https://i.postimg.cc/xd4NNzwW/IMG-1088-Copy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7CSZpfYV)

(https://i.postimg.cc/mZM1hh85/IMG-1087-Copy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/F1rHBFty)

(https://i.postimg.cc/nz18w4nW/IMG-1109-Copy.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/PpNFC8pb)

The engine was seized and needed new pistons, used cylinders, heads and crank shaft, new seals, gaskets and some case bearings,

It took a real effort of heat, pressure and pounding to get the pistons to break free from the rusted in cylinders

Its been completely stripped down to the last nut and bolt, powder coating and zinc platting is done, the wheels have been rebuilt with new stainless spokes, polished Borani rims and Pirelli Sport Demons.


Engine rebuilt,

(https://i.postimg.cc/P5SMmZtD/IMG-1198.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/xTy51hht/IMG-1203.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/B6R7qNJb/IMG-4045.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ygXyjmgC)

laid it on its side and dropped the frame over the motor

(https://i.postimg.cc/FKf03BCt/IMG-1209.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Waiting for the chrome plating and the brake shoes to get the linings replaced.

Painting was done last year


About 500 more jobs to do before its rebuilt.



Detlef Bauer in Germany has been great providing everything I need to restore it. He has all the rubber bits, mufflers, headers, sprockets, wire harness, cables, specialty engine parts, switches, gauges etc.....

Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: Rick4003 on October 19, 2018, 07:59:00 PM
Looks really good Jim, another classic get a new chance in life [emoji4]

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on October 19, 2018, 09:22:37 PM
 :thumb:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: Huzo on October 20, 2018, 03:54:26 AM
Freaking genius..
Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: canuck750 on October 20, 2018, 11:42:04 AM
The build quality of the Benelli is pretty impressive, take a look at the cylinder head mountings, there are a total of four thick steel plates, two per side that mount to the frame and the heads, Benelli weren't looking to save any weight when they designed this

(https://i.postimg.cc/FHCjf4Zg/IMG-1212.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Then there is a thick plate at the front, two bolts to the engine block and two to the frame

(https://i.postimg.cc/8kdMRW4C/IMG-1215.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Around the back is a long bolt passing through the block and frame on each side and for good measure another bracket on each side of the rear of the block bolts top the frame, 4 bolts on top, two on the front, two on the sides and two on the back, overkill?

(https://i.postimg.cc/pX28qTcJ/IMG-1218.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

This is on rigid frame / engine unit, there are rubber isolators for the instruments, the handle bars, coils, regulator, rectifier, battery box, and the foot pegs have the porcupine ribs on them, keeping the twin cylinders rigid to the frame must have passed a lot of vibration along to the rider.

Some other peculiarities of the Benelli are the O rings for the head to cylinders

The engine has two oil filters, a standard cartridge type and mesh gauze one as well

The crank shaft is supported on five rollers and the transmission is equally well supported on massive bearings

(https://i.postimg.cc/ZqZCKDkF/IMG-1347.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Everything is very solid, even the head studs are thicker than most I have seen

Clutch hub bearings

Lovely cam followers

I certainly wouldn't claim the Tornado is as sleek as a Ducati 750 GT or a Guzzi V7 Sport of the same period but it certainly is built like a tank and it has a lot of fine components on it.

It's growing on me.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: Dave Swanson on October 20, 2018, 12:29:28 PM
What a stroke of luck to have a parts source in Detlif!   I don't think Palo Alto Speedo can save your clocks! :)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: canuck750 on October 20, 2018, 12:33:33 PM
I don't think Palo Alto Speedo can save your clocks! :)

Damn, I was going to test their capabilities! 

Good thing I found some NOS ones over the years, this is how I usually end up finding a 'project bike' by first thinking I want one, start looking for parts then find the bike, ass-backwards I guess but it seems to be how my brain works. :thewife:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: canuck750 on October 20, 2018, 09:41:28 PM
Spent a couple hours this morning fitting a few more bits, started with the swing arm axle, zinc plating made the axle too large so some careful polishing on the lathe with fine emery cloth until it just slides in past the bronze swing arm bushings, took about a half hour of removing very tiny amounts of plating

(https://i.postimg.cc/BbNjdT7c/IMG-1222.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Then the swing arm could be fitted and suspended with a pair of old Koni shocks I had laying around, I am rebuilding the original Ceriani's need to find a hard chrome plating shop that will replate and grind the chrome shock shafts

(https://i.postimg.cc/gJzd1fCQ/IMG-1247.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

The battery box is suspended on four rubber silent blocks

(https://i.postimg.cc/Vv7N7Y5K/IMG-1224.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/5yfH77g2/IMG-1223.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Same set up for the front coil bracket but two silent blocks up front

I will tackle the front end next, forks have been stripped, cleaned and lowers polished, new fork seals fitted ready to go back on.

This assembly part is the enjoyable stage of a build, the hours of cleaning, repairing, replacing and rebuilding each component is the hard work behind me.

Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: canuck750 on October 21, 2018, 05:55:01 PM
Electrical components are same as on the Tonti Guzzi, Bosch diode board, regulator, starter solenoid, even the rotor and stator are the same

(https://i.postimg.cc/Rh0SJjGK/IMG-1232.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/B6pZ6q5J/IMG-1231.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Same coils but mounted up high and in front of the engine

I started to empty one box so I just continued putting on parts as they came out, no particular order but the bolt box is getting a little lighter



Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: Turin on October 21, 2018, 07:44:39 PM
That is going to be sweet! The green and black looks outstanding. :thumb:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: Mayor_of_BBQ on October 23, 2018, 02:25:31 PM
Yes! Love this build! Keep it rolling Canuck :popcorn:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli
Post by: canuck750 on October 23, 2018, 07:17:39 PM
A couple more pieces migrated out of the plastic bins onto the bike frame,

Vapour blasted the original CEV fuse box (same one as on the Guzzi V7 Sport), cleaned the original rubber breather hoses with acetone, they still look good after 44 years, tool tray cleaned up fine and shows no trace of the rusted mess it was

I found some black metal cable straps on Ebay that look like the original ones that came on the bike

(https://i.postimg.cc/nLn6Lq3Q/IMG-1260.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/8P68XpFs/IMG-1257.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Need tp pick up some 16mm stainless steel hose clamps, this chrome plated cable guide fits onto the valve cover retaining bolt, I ceramic coated the exhaust header collaes

I got these new rubber plugs that hold a pin on the side covers


centre stand and lower chain cover

(https://i.postimg.cc/pV7bBhLg/IMG-1258.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Horn attaches to the frame up front

(https://i.postimg.cc/ZqczPwWc/IMG-1254.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Carb intake manifolds have a cross over tube (like a Laverda SF1)

(https://i.postimg.cc/sgBgfd0h/IMG-1585.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Funky repro hedge hog foot pegs

(https://i.postimg.cc/MKN6X3Bf/IMG-1248.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Seat pivot pin was saved and zinc plated, put the lift handle back on

(https://i.postimg.cc/NjXgX88J/IMG-1249.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/pTLbsK8t/IMG-1252.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/0QXgFrdK/IMG-1253.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/xdgBNqZp/IMG-1262.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/GmbCB022/IMG-1263.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Turin on October 24, 2018, 11:03:45 PM
Wow. I do not have the patience to attempt a restoration like this. Impressive.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 25, 2018, 09:55:31 PM
Fitting the triple clamps, I lost or all the balls were never in the headstock when I the bike. I bought 60 new steel balls, greased the lower race and fitted the balls,

(https://i.postimg.cc/yx3GGj82/IMG-1270.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/nzzg4pbF/IMG-1264.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Top race

(https://i.postimg.cc/Df1dxRvn/IMG-1208.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Top race nut

(https://i.postimg.cc/jqWdKrwY/IMG-1272.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Then the upper triple with the headlight ears and their rubber gaskets, the fork legs and then the bar clamps

(https://i.postimg.cc/KvBGkrD9/IMG-1273.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Fitted the gauge mount with new rubber grommets and replated fasteners

(https://i.postimg.cc/FHxhGrq3/IMG-1274.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Speedometer was a new one (or nearly new) I got from Ebay

(https://i.postimg.cc/L4ZRwBwH/IMG-1276.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/wj4G9nRn/IMG-1281.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/bww5cqrQ/IMG-1283.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Refitted the cleaned up idiot lights

I need to make new coloured inserts for the idiot light bodies

I have two used tachometers, both have the silent blocks worn out or missing and the bezels are scraped up

(https://i.postimg.cc/X73hLf01/IMG-1279.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/FRLqWGR8/IMG-1280.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)




Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 25, 2018, 10:03:37 PM
I made this gauge holding tool years ago to repair Eldorado gauges, same diameter Veglia gauge, the holder keeps the gauge tight so the bezel can be peeled off

(https://i.postimg.cc/nrnk41Qv/IMG-1290.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Slowly work a fine crew driver blade around the bezel prying it up

(https://i.postimg.cc/7639JRbH/IMG-1292.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Then pry the bezel and glass off

(https://i.postimg.cc/htN1ynd4/IMG-1294.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

The silent blocks are shot, I screwed in some machine screws with locklite and lock nits, then cut the heads off


(https://i.postimg.cc/FKt0bxM7/IMG-1301.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I had a spare Eldorado bezel to replace the dented one off the Tornado

Clamp the gauge with the new bezel cleaned up glass and rubber then tap the bezel back down

(https://i.postimg.cc/NfM8QF8f/IMG-1298.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Looks like this, just needs the chrome painted black

(https://i.postimg.cc/pr0DDMvH/IMG-1300.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

These sections of rubber hose will act like the silent block studs

Painted the bezel, this will be a close enough match to the speedo

(https://i.postimg.cc/63tRgp5K/IMG-1303.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Just need to clean the paint flash off the glass once the paint dries over night

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 25, 2018, 10:08:49 PM
I fitted the starter motor drive train

(https://i.postimg.cc/Dyrhyf7H/IMG-1266.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

The new gasket set I got is not the best, the starter cover gasket just does not fit, crap pattern parts

(https://i.postimg.cc/vBNjXkbW/IMG-1269.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

A local gasket manufacturer gave me a big scrap of gasket paper today

(https://i.postimg.cc/Kz3SXx99/IMG-1267.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Grease the mating surface

(https://i.postimg.cc/qqrmmTW6/IMG-1287.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

pressed the cover onto the paper

(https://i.postimg.cc/RF5GFmSp/IMG-1288.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Then use hollow punches to cut out the holes and scissors to trim the gasket

Holding it in place with blots and nuts until I mount the cover

(https://i.postimg.cc/RF5GFmSp/IMG-1288.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on October 25, 2018, 11:55:46 PM
I fitted the starter motor drive train

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1267_zpswayrhn93.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1267_zpswayrhn93.jpg.html)

The new gasket set I got is not the best, the starter cover gasket just does not fit, crap pattern parts

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1269_zpsfjwa1kox.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1269_zpsfjwa1kox.jpg.html)

A local gasket manufacturer gave me a big scrap of gasket paper today

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1284_zpsed30xjtx.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1284_zpsed30xjtx.jpg.html)

Grease the mating surface

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1286_zpsasa04npt.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1286_zpsasa04npt.jpg.html)

pressed the cover onto the paper

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1287_zpsxgnto9wx.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1287_zpsxgnto9wx.jpg.html)

Then use hollow punches to cut out the holes and scissors to trim the gasket

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1288_zpsak2x6bco.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1288_zpsak2x6bco.jpg.html)

Holding it in place with blots and nuts until I mount the cover

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1289_zpsjpy27v7f.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1289_zpsjpy27v7f.jpg.html)
Looks good everything!

The non matching gasket, could that be due to a long shelf life. It might have shrunk from dehydration, often seen with old paper gaskets?

Anyway the new gasket looks good and the grease trick is neat, I have to remember that [emoji4]

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 26, 2018, 09:52:45 AM

The non matching gasket, could that be due to a long shelf life. It might have shrunk from dehydration, often seen with old paper gaskets?


I hadn't thought of that, makes sense, so much for buying 40+ year old paper gaskets in the future. The shop I got the gasket paper is all computer controlled scan and cut operation. Getting a one off gasket made is possible but the set up time means that getting at least ten made starts to make sense cost wise. I got a tour of the operation and I was amazed at the cleanliness and the size of the flat bed cutting tables they have, they were churning out thick metal/fibre gaskets for some very large flanges, probably oil field related.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on October 26, 2018, 10:05:15 AM
I hadn't thought of that, makes sense, so much for buying 40+ year old paper gaskets in the future. The shop I got the gasket paper is all computer controlled scan and cut operation. Getting a one off gasket made is possible but the set up time means that getting at least ten made starts to make sense cost wise. I got a tour of the operation and I was amazed at the cleanliness and the size of the flat bed cutting tables they have, they were churning out thick metal/fibre gaskets for some very large flanges, probably oil field related.
I think it was Charlie that came up with a tip on misting the gaskets with a water spray for getting them back to the right size. Seemed to work well.


Sounds like an interesting place to visit your local gasket shop. Would love to see how they cut it all using cnc.

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Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on October 26, 2018, 10:08:00 AM
I think it was Charlie that came up with a tip on misting the gaskets with a water spray for getting them back to the right size. Seemed to work well.

Yes. I just use a spray bottle and mist any shrunken gaskets prior to installation.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 26, 2018, 12:21:17 PM
Yes. I just use a spray bottle and mist any shrunken gaskets prior to installation.

Thanks for this, I will have to give it a try, I have other old paper gaskets that no longer fit the engine side covers.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on October 26, 2018, 12:32:34 PM
Thanks for this, I will have to give it a try, I have other old paper gaskets that no longer fit the engine side covers.

The gaskets usually shrink again as they dry, so you pretty much have to spray and install very soon afterwards.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 27, 2018, 11:24:01 AM
Two gauges back in place

(https://i.postimg.cc/vBNV6SK7/IMG-1609.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/1nDtkMs4)

Installed the new clutch discs and springs, I had the spring carriers and nuts zinc plated

Installed the starter chain cover and the rotor and stator

And then test fitted the left side outer cover, just because I wanted to see something shiny and pretty go back on for now, I love the Benelli logo with the proud lion


If anyone knows where I can find an original side stand for this bike please send me a PM.

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Dave Swanson on October 27, 2018, 11:51:33 AM
Love that Benelli badge!!
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 28, 2018, 10:31:39 AM
This special oil feed blot arrived in the mail on Friday from Detlef Burian, he has been a saviour providing missing special parts

I have found a lot of parts form this seller on Ebay, santo_di_motocicli, real good service, he is sending me a pair of NOS passenger footrest rubbers and has provide lots of little parts

I had the exhaust supports chrome plated and the badly rusted foot rest brackets cad plated

I picked up the chrome plating on Saturday, the plating shop in Calgary Alberta does real nice work!

Rear sub frame back on

I need to fit rubber washers between the tail light mount and the fender

After seeing David Swanson's nicely polished rear fender from his 1000S restoration I think I need to give this fender another go.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 28, 2018, 05:50:33 PM
The Tornado came with just one signal light and it unfortunately it was damaged. CEV made these cast aluminum signal light bodies and they are quite hard to find but Harley Davidson / Aermacchi used them on a couple models and I have been able to gather up a set buying a couple at a time as they have come up on Ebay. The flange that surounds the base of the plastic lens is very thin and several were split, I managed to get four but they are pretty beat up.


Before polishing I use a random orbital foam backed sander with 280 grit, and slowly sand out the damage as much as possible while keeping the minimum thickness of the flange intact.

(https://i.postimg.cc/MKfCCMbd/IMG-1322.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/GHrgYpfy)

Rouge polishing compound a sisal polishing wheel finishing with a soft wheel and then a light hand polish with Autosol

(https://i.postimg.cc/m2Lq6tjL/IMG-1686.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

lamp holders clean up in the vapour blast cabinet

Nice and bright

(https://i.postimg.cc/L4G9gMxQ/IMG-1327.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/7bM8jj8S)

Installed the tail light on the rear lamp holder

(https://i.postimg.cc/d1LFDWrK/IMG-1329.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/G8wV5xXM)

I looked up stainless steel polishing on Google and bought a stick of green polishing compound, repolished the rear fender, spent a half hour on it, much better but still not a chrome like shine




Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Dave Swanson on October 28, 2018, 06:45:34 PM
Wow,  it is really coming together nicely.  A very ambitious project to say the least!
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 30, 2018, 06:21:12 PM
Some initial progress today

Front fender and brake plate supports installed

(https://i.postimg.cc/5NwVHQYj/IMG-1334.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/KRvVwz5y)

new rear foot rest rubbers came in the mail today

(https://i.postimg.cc/yN6sC6Nx/IMG-1331.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/WdyQMvgc)

Assembled the brake plates with relined and arced brake shoes

(https://i.postimg.cc/5NMcM97J/IMG-1336.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/F1GCyvXC)

Then I went rummaging in bins for the steering damper, notthing, dug into another lot of boxes marked Morini and there it was another box of Benelli parts, there was the steering stabilizer, the headlight and one more zip lock bag with a strange part all by itself, carefully cleaned and tucked away by the idiot hat took this bike apart a year + ago ...

I knew in an instant what it is...

And I know what it means.... :thewife: :thewife: :thewife:


The engine comes out tomorrow and gets stripped all apart, this part in a miss marked bin alone in a zip lock is the shift dog that fits onto the main cluster

I took this motor apart over a year ago and I thought I had left the two transmission shafts with their gears intact, untouched .... obviously not. I had tested the shifting, it worked fine or so I thought, kinda heartbreaking but so it goes..... we learn by our mistakes  :embarrassed:

Now to strip the top end and lift the motor out of the frame and strip it down.

Maybe practice will make perfect.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on October 31, 2018, 11:49:49 AM
That is a bummer! Hope you get it back together with no missing parts this time.
I hate it when you get everything bolted back together and you find that one missing part! Did the same on the Alfa engine [emoji51]

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on October 31, 2018, 05:04:14 PM
I was able to strip the entire top half of the motor in the frame


Now to spend another afternoon putting it all back together, not that big a deal in the great scheme of things
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on November 01, 2018, 02:17:19 AM
Looks good.
That Benelli engine looks even more agricultural than the Guzzis! Just look at those gears!
Do they have any downfalls reliability vise? From the look of the parts it should go on forever! Unless it shakes itself to death

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Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 01, 2018, 11:09:59 AM
Looks good.
That Benelli engine looks even more agricultural than the Guzzis! Just look at those gears!
Do they have any downfalls reliability vise? From the look of the parts it should go on forever! Unless it shakes itself to death

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

I have not read of any known major faults with the 650 other than the rear /side engine to frame mounts cracking, mine had one steel tab fractured. They supposedly shake a bit, don't know if the rubber porcupine foot rests dissipate the vibration, looking forward to getting it running. Its one solid built motor.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 03, 2018, 09:36:55 PM
Back to our regular programming, the engine is back together and on to next tasks,

Getting ready to install the rear wheel, I had not taken the bearings out of the sprocket carrier, to say they were stuck is an understatement, several liberal heating's of the bearing inner race with oxy /acet where it meets the removable spindle sleeve and then a quenching in water, repeat again and again then strike the sleeve until it breaks free of the bearings and then the bearings knocked out. 30+ years of rust seeping into the bearing to sleeve gap. need to clean up the parts and install new bearings.

(https://i.postimg.cc/t4CMXsFK/IMG-1368.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/KRwNfvqf)


(https://i.postimg.cc/26PsyCC4/IMG-1367.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/bD9CFcDJ)

I got the speedo drive fitted but the large gear that fits into the front hub is AWOL, maybe it was missing all along, can't recall. Looks to be the same speedo drive that is a Moto Guzzi gear box

Checked my own photo records the speedo drive gear is fixed to the hub

(https://i.postimg.cc/W4ntD6TR/IMG-1350.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Turin on November 04, 2018, 09:17:12 AM
 :popcorn:
Good stuff !
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 04, 2018, 02:16:28 PM
Rear sprocket carrier assembled with new bearings and a new rubber damper, sprocket and bolt lock tabs

On to the front wheel, Benelli uses some 7mm bolts on this bike like on the chain tensioner and the brake arm pinch bolts, a trip to the bolt shop for Monday


Zinc plated axle needs some plating skimmed off, emery cloth on a spinning axle

Wheel in position, I had to let the air out of the tire to clear the fender support nuts, the Pirelli is a bit too wide for the bike but it does fit, just

One of the chain tensioner bolts was seized and snapped off, a new 7mm bolt with the threads tapped to the head and the tip machined back

In the vice and the tip of the bolt peended over

Rear axle and carrier in position

Bosch starter more needs reassembling, I need to find some brushes, two are cracked

Starting to look like a motorcycle again

(https://i.postimg.cc/3wzSC9zh/IMG-1373.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/jWQ4R6s3)

(https://i.postimg.cc/50cgFyFN/IMG-1378.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/GBQGWcQZ)

(https://i.postimg.cc/Y0RzVxDh/IMG-1375.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/30yG02TT)

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on November 04, 2018, 02:28:58 PM
Fantastic work!

Also love that brake assembly, it is a stunning piece of cast aluminium!



Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 04, 2018, 04:38:21 PM
Unsurprisingly, the front brake is very similar to the one on the '74 Morini 3 1/2 Sport. Morini used a few M7 bolts in various locations as well.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 04, 2018, 05:46:22 PM
Unsurprisingly, the front brake is very similar to the one on the '74 Morini 3 1/2 Sport. Morini used a few M7 bolts in various locations as well.

The Benelli Tornado brakes were reportedly made by Grimeca, no stampings crediting Grimeca on the castings. I think the brake back plates are beautiful!

The original Laverda 750 twins were also fitted with Grimeca brakes but Laverda deemed them to be not up to the task and subsequently designed their own Super Feni (super brakes) hence the 'SF' prefix to the Laverda 750 badge. The Laverda drum brake mechanism is quite interesting.

Not sure if the 75 Sport Morini drum brake is supplied by Grimeca, the later Morini disc brake caliper and master cylinder is a Grimeca product.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 06, 2018, 06:12:27 PM
Picked up a new seal today


Fitting the rear wheel

Had the rear brake shoes relined and arced

(https://i.postimg.cc/0y9z9B1G/IMG-1402.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

The Benelli uses twin torque arms for the rear brake plate

Its always a milestone moment in my mind when the bike is back on its own two wheels

(https://i.postimg.cc/dtY19x3M/IMG-1406.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Installed the Bosch starter motor, scratched my head for an hour trying to get the starter drive shaft spline to fit into the engine chain case, the cap on the motor can go on either side of course I had the cap on reversed, flip it over and in went the starter

And this horseshoe bracket is not symmetrical, and it too was on backwards

(https://i.postimg.cc/7ZzhBZW2/IMG-1755.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/0z89jPxk)

(https://i.postimg.cc/Jh20c7DK/IMG-1405.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Fitted the front exhaust brackets

(https://i.postimg.cc/PJkt2Ctb/IMG-1411.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Dug put another parts box with the hand controls, chain etc.... for another day.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on November 07, 2018, 11:11:53 AM
Great work!  :thumb: :bow:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Green1000S on November 08, 2018, 05:48:13 PM


This is one lucky bike.  :thumb:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 08, 2018, 07:28:49 PM
Yep she's one lucky Benelli, was destined to be parted out but was definitely worth saving.

The steering damper is a simple friction device that compresses two plastic discs between metal plates, I never have understood how restricting the movement of the steering is a good or necessary thing but this style was used on a lot of Italian motorcycles

(https://i.postimg.cc/KzTGPPyv/IMG-1416.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/J4MrXHYM/IMG-1417.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/3J1KFrzp/IMG-1418.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Rear brake pedal passes through the frame in the usual manner with this crank arm that connects a rod to the rear brake control arm plus the leg on the crank engages a pin activated brake light switch

(https://i.postimg.cc/Bvrsnj1W/IMG-1422.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Looking at the picture I posted the other day I saw I was missing a circlip  :thewife:

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1423_zpsci6b60yt.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1423_zpsci6b60yt.jpg.html)

New tach cable fitted to the front of the engine case that engages a gear on the cam shaft

(https://i.postimg.cc/vTmPRzHG/IMG-1439.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Up through this metal cable guide and into the back of the tach

(https://i.postimg.cc/3wdJRMSG/IMG-1415.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Original CEV push to start button weather beaten


Just needs freshening up


A liberal wipe down with laquer thinner restored the luster to the black plastic

Installed the timing gear over the end of the cam shaft

Polished the side cover, installed new oil seals for the various shafts and installed a new oil site glass


I still have to install the advance mechanism, points, condensers and wiring

New foot rubbers for the kick starter and shifter, the kick starter sits at a crazy angle

I opened the plastic bag with the new wire harness and am pleased to find it includes all the sub harness sections and he rubber boots as well! I need to use conductive epoxy glue the wires onto the switches and then start to install the wires.

I am looking for a pair of original carbs for this bike if anyone has some for sale, they are similar to the Guzzi VHB29 Delorto used on the Eldorado but they don't have accelerator pumps. I could use a set of extra VHB29's I have for a Guuzzi but would prefer to find original carbs for it.






Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Huzo on November 09, 2018, 02:11:10 AM
Is there any way you would consider leaving the kick starter off ?
I cannot believe how lovely those castings are and the fresh look of the gears and mechanical componentry. It's a beautiful bike the way you have brought it back from the brink.. :bow:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 09, 2018, 09:00:56 AM
On the two I've had here, the lever actually sits a bit lower yet, almost horizontal.

(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/31946956_1539611676160958_9140694083910500352_o.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&oh=9f05aaa514013e9b16eabc6405770ada&oe=5C7F36E8)

Brochure photo shows it the same way.
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/beneli/benelli_650_tornado.htm
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 09, 2018, 09:36:09 AM
On the two I've had here, the lever actually sits a bit lower yet, almost horizontal.

(https://scontent-iad3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/31946956_1539611676160958_9140694083910500352_o.jpg?_nc_cat=106&_nc_ht=scontent-iad3-1.xx&oh=9f05aaa514013e9b16eabc6405770ada&oe=5C7F36E8)

Brochure photo shows it the same way.
https://www.motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/beneli/benelli_650_tornado.htm

Thanks Charlie, that is one low position, I hope the electric starter is reliable, don't fancy kicking it with the short throw kick pedal.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 09, 2018, 11:13:36 AM
Thanks Charlie, that is one low position, I hope the electric starter is reliable, don't fancy kicking it with the short throw kick pedal.

The sprag starter clutch on the one I owned back in the early '90s worked perfectly...until one day when it didn't. Just started slipping one day. I sold the bike before I had a chance to find out why. On the customer's bike shown, it worked flawlessly.

The kickstarter works well too - since the stroke is so short, one kick really spins the engine over.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 09, 2018, 12:08:21 PM
The sprag starter clutch on the one I owned back in the early '90s worked perfectly...until one day when it didn't. Just started slipping one day. I sold the bike before I had a chance to find out why. On the customer's bike shown, it worked flawlessly.

The kickstarter works well too - since the stroke is so short, one kick really spins the engine over.

Good to know

I split the sprag clutch good thing I did, full of rust

(https://i.postimg.cc/Wp9xymBB/IMG-4030.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/23ZHbW8G)

Cleaned up and I think it works fine now, the sheet metal cover tabs broke off so I had to spot tack weld the cover to the steel out casting and then file down the little welds to just hold the cover on.

(https://i.postimg.cc/nzpNy3cJ/IMG-4031.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/B87hDcKY)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 09, 2018, 07:11:37 PM
right hand control perch, lever and start button fitted, I found some big fat grips on Ebay that looked right for the Tornado

(https://i.postimg.cc/0NdQsHx5/IMG-1756.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/1gXP0Bfb)

Installing the new headers and cross over, they came as raw steel from Germany, new exhaust gasket and replated header crimp plates

(https://i.postimg.cc/s2y4dcwb/IMG-1448.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/nMbQKFWN/IMG-1454.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Its a pretty rigid exhaust mounting

Muffler brackets carry the muffler with two silent blocks but the passenger foot rests I bought turn out to not be correct for the Tornado, I need to find another type of footrest

(https://i.postimg.cc/zDP7bTGR/IMG-1446.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/B6jgMvhv/IMG-1456.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

As I was taking the side view picture I got to thinking how is the centre stand flipped down?, and then the penny dropped, the tang has broken off the side stand

I need to get some steel rod, break out the oxy/acet form a tang and then grind off the remnant and weld it on.

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 10, 2018, 07:33:03 PM
Silent blocks installed on the mufflers and support brackets


Spacers fitted to the front header to engine supports


Installed the front brake cables and cable splitter

(https://i.postimg.cc/cCsJdvVx/IMG-1492.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I found another used seat on Ebay a couple years ago, not too bad but lots of surface rust

(https://i.postimg.cc/Y0bC0pH1/IMG-1491.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Will need to repair the cover, no reproductions available

Vapour blasted the seat base and I painted with POR-15 gloss black

A sneak peek at the gas tank on the bike, I need to polish the stainless steel tank trim

I like this bright green colour a lot more than the original gold / black colours
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Mayor_of_BBQ on November 11, 2018, 10:05:40 AM
This is really fantastic... idk how you find the time to document these builds.. but it is much appreciated!

Just curious, is this one to keep or sell when it's completed?
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 11, 2018, 10:23:59 AM
This is really fantastic... idk how you find the time to document these builds.. but it is much appreciated!

Just curious, is this one to keep or sell when it's completed?

I like to document the rebuild so when I sell them on I have a memory of them. I want to keep the Benelli but I have to make room and raise some cash for other builds, probably going to sell a couple of my restored bikes in the new year. I may sell my V7 Sport and Morini 500. Wish I could keep them all but money and space are limited.

Cheers

Jim
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: bodine99 on November 12, 2018, 02:01:10 PM
WOW!!!!!  Great job so far. I clicked on this subject cause I was looking back through a copy the other day of Motorcycle Classics magazine. I was looking and reading about the 66 BSA Hornet story again. On the cover of the Nov./Dec. 2009 is a 1973 Tornado 650s. Header asks Better Than a Bonneville?? "The Best Italian Bike You Never Heard Of" !! Great story and bitchin bike!!
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 15, 2018, 12:08:57 PM
I found a set of rear foot pegs on Ebay that look similar to the originals (I only have pictures from Google of what the rear foot pegs look like)m in any event they were listed as fitting Ducati so the price was in line with the Ducati label....

and they don't foul with the exhaust in the down position

(https://i.postimg.cc/VvkCSP4k/IMG-1519.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Q9vtPPR2)

Detlef Burian sent me a carburetor to match to match the one that came with the bike, its a VHB 29 without an accelerator pump, all parts there if a little gummed up

Cleaning each piece in the vapour blaster then into the ultrasonic cleaner and it all comes out nice and clean

(https://i.postimg.cc/52d2TMvQ/IMG-1522.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/N5Dt2SdQ)

carb kits fitted,


Replaced the hardware with new pieces
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 15, 2018, 01:54:29 PM
I was just getting ready to PM you with a link to a pair of carbs a guy on the Guzziriders (UK) passed on to me. Glad you found one.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 15, 2018, 07:35:57 PM
I was just getting ready to PM you with a link to a pair of carbs a guy on the Guzziriders (UK) passed on to me. Glad you found one.

Thanks for thinking about me!

I got the carbs together today and back on the bike, these particular VHB's are hard to find, Detlef Bauer had the rubber intake boots in stock and supplied new cables for throttle and choke.

(https://i.postimg.cc/282fFRGf/IMG-1546.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/pph7RS30)

Typical Italian bike of the era with no air filtration, I am going to see if I can keep the rubber boots and fit some form of air filter at the mouths of the boot that will be hidden behind the side covers


The Benelli intake manifolds have a balance tube between them like the laverda SF1 I have, is this supposed to balance the intake pulses?

I got seat base painted with Por-15 epoxy paint, Por-15 sticks like powder coat once cured

The original foam is still solid and reusable

I found a local business that repairs vinyl and leather, last year I got into my car with a small flat blade screwdriver in my back pocket and promptly stabbed the seat of my car, the seats are perforated leather and the repair the mobile shop did was amazing. I had the same tech repair my Laverda SF seat, he fixed to rips and re-stained the black vinyl, it came out looking like new. I am taking the seat cover to them on Friday, hopefully they can restore the vinyl to like new. I am hoping they can restore the plastic chrome strip molded into the seat sides. The inside of the cover is in real good shape.

Rips at the front where the cover stretches over the sharp edges of the seat pan, the metal needs rubber sleeves installed over the edges before the cover is reattached

A couple small rips in the cover

(https://i.postimg.cc/KvfM32Np/IMG-1460.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I will post some 'after' pictures when I get the seat cover back
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 15, 2018, 09:52:44 PM
Typical Italian bike of the era with no air filtration, I am going to see if I can keep the rubber boots and fit some form of air filter at the mouths of the boot that will be hidden behind the side covers

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1548_zps44qrtlpl.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1548_zps44qrtlpl.jpg.html)

On my Tornado, I cut a 2" length of steel exhaust pipe that had an o.d. the same as or close to the i.d. of the rubber boot. Hose clamped that 1" into the opening of the boot, then installed UNI foam pod filters over the protruding 1".
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 15, 2018, 10:14:14 PM
On my Tornado, I cut a 2" length of steel exhaust pipe that had an o.d. the same as or close to the i.d. of the rubber boot. Hose clamped that 1" into the opening of the boot, then installed UNI foam pod filters over the protruding 1".

I like that idea!  Thanks
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 17, 2018, 04:02:41 PM
I finished installing the throttle and choke cables and freshened up the choke lever

Installed a new steering lock

And installed the reproduction side cover emblems and the side covers

(https://i.postimg.cc/XNBd6bjT/IMG-1817.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

and a locking gas cap

Now back to waiting on few last parts and the seat to  be restored. I found a side stand from a tip on the Benelli Forum, it was for sale on an Italian web site.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 17, 2018, 04:23:13 PM
 :thumb: :thumb:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: SED on November 20, 2018, 11:43:28 PM
Beautiful work (even with the missed shift dog) and an inspiration.

BTW - a output shaft shim was lost when putting the GTV engine together and I compensated by adding a shim to the outside. Didn't find the problem 'til months later when cleaning under the stove!  :thewife:  The real fix is to tear it out of the frame and split the cases - but I've just not gotten there yet... 
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 21, 2018, 06:25:05 PM
Beautiful work (even with the missed shift dog) and an inspiration.

BTW - a output shaft shim was lost when putting the GTV engine together and I compensated by adding a shim to the outside. Didn't find the problem 'til months later when cleaning under the stove!  :thewife:  The real fix is to tear it out of the frame and split the cases - but I've just not gotten there yet...

Thanks Shaun,

I found Dellorto carb had the V11 needles in stock that I need for these carbs, one more hard to fid part sourced.

The swing arm has a large jamb nut, it was missing on the bike when I got it and Detlef Burian sent me one that is a wee bit too small. The threads are very fine for such a big thread, I am guessing 1.5 pitch? and maybe a 27mm size?? I have been searching on line for someone who caries such a big metric jamb nut, does anyone know a source for such odd metric stuff? I don't have McMaster Carr in Canada and they will not ship outside of the USA??
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on November 21, 2018, 07:44:18 PM
The swing arm has a large jamb nut, it was missing on the bike when I got it and Detlef Burian sent me one that is a wee bit too small. The threads are very fine for such a big thread, I am guessing 1.5 pitch? and maybe a 27mm size?? I have been searching on line for someone who caries such a big metric jamb nut, does anyone know a source for such odd metric stuff? I don't have McMaster Carr in Canada and they will not ship outside of the USA??

Measure to determine exactly what diameter and thread pitch you need and I'll see what I can find. 
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on November 21, 2018, 07:55:18 PM
Measure to determine exactly what diameter and thread pitch you need and I'll see what I can find.

Thanks !

I will check when I get back home on the 29th.

Cheers

Jim
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 01, 2018, 06:11:09 PM
Got some time in on the Benelli today, started with fitting the new chain, I read an article in Classic Bike where Rick Parkington talks about using a chain puller to bring the two ends of the chain together. I found several on Ebay and got this one from China with free shipping for $15.00, great little tool

https://www.ebay.com/itm/25-35-41-40-50-60-415H-428H-520-530-Roller-Chain-Connecting-Puller-Holder/172623069155?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649

(https://i.postimg.cc/nchL5Q4T/IMG-1583.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

and I fitted the chain guard, it has few dents and its split at he back but until I can find a better one this will do

(https://i.postimg.cc/6pMyGj6r/IMG-1818.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I started to install the wiring, the repro wire harness comes with clear soft plastic covers that are too fat for the CEV fuse box and terminal box, cut off the connections and installed salvaged plastic covers and new fittings

(https://i.postimg.cc/3wpcVpDq/IMG-1636.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I got the alternator, regulator, rectifier and ignition switch wires done and the starter and battery positive wires on.

(https://i.postimg.cc/pV9FHZdy/IMG-1630.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 02, 2018, 07:02:39 PM
I 'borrowed' the Ceriani shocks off my Laverda SF1 while I wait on the Benelli's pair getting the hard chrome plating of the worn shafts. I like the quality of the Ceriani shocks and the hand adjuster lever cast into the lower spring retainer.

(https://i.postimg.cc/N047gHnF/IMG-1447.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Marzocchi made the forks so I added some repro decals, I don't think Benelli ever placed the decals like Moto-Morini and Ducati did but I like the look of the decal and I think it adds a little touch to the build

(https://i.postimg.cc/Cx39JYKS/IMG-1822.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Points plate, points, condensers and new wire sub harness up to the fuse box

Advance mechanism cleaned and lubricated

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1591_zpsdu2p9ckm.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1591_zpsdu2p9ckm.jpg.html)

I got a high tension wire set from Guzzino, it comes with the two ends formed onto one wire, fit the length, cut the wire and fit the open end into the coils

(https://i.postimg.cc/7ZSRQ0zW/IMG-1644.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Detlef's wire harness kit comes with the rubber cap boots already fitted over the ends for the coils

All the ends terminating at the fuse box where cut off and re-fitted with the hard plastic ends of the original harness anew ends crimped on.

The tank trim is stainless steel but this bike suffered a lot of abuse, I cleaned and polished it up as best I could, it looks ok from a few feet back but its far from perfect.

(https://i.postimg.cc/x8yR3yhv/IMG-1645.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/7Zr7X2wh/IMG-1642.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 05, 2018, 10:12:51 AM
The three dash idiot light lens are all in very poor condition, Detlef sent me three new style LED lights to replace the original bulb and bezel units but I prefer the bezel of the original.

The LED is a one piece bezel and bulb, the original bezel that holds a coloured plastic disc inside

(https://i.postimg.cc/FHxhGrq3/IMG-1274.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I put the new unit in my lathe and turned off the bezel and threads until the LED body slid snug into the old bezel

(https://i.postimg.cc/KvBGkrD9/IMG-1273.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I had two Benelli dash boards and salvaged three bezels from the lot, the lights are similar but not identical, one having a larger aperature

A little epoxy to make sure the sure in LED stays in place


Three refreshed idiot lights installed and wired in to the fuse box, the lights should be visible in the sun light, a common knock on Italian bikes of the period that as the poor dash lights and equally poor gauge accuracy.

(https://i.postimg.cc/L4ZRwBwH/IMG-1276.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Repainted the headlight bucket and fitted a spare rubber lamp gasket and chrome trim ring, same CEV unit used on the Moto Guzzi V7 Sport

(https://i.postimg.cc/prx7vTtB/IMG-1684.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I have to get some stainless solid bar and turn up a pair of front signal light stems with a threaded end to screw into the headlight bucket, the lamp end will have a 1/2 ring cut out to take the 6mm pinch bolt passing through the signal light body. seems these CEV / Benelli front signal light stems are unobtanium.

(https://i.postimg.cc/X73hLf01/IMG-1279.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)



Neutral light wire running down the centre of the frame rail to the neutral switch in the back of the crankcase

Getting close now, need to have it ready for the International Motorcycle Show in town for January 11th.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on December 05, 2018, 12:01:03 PM
 :thumb: :thumb:
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 05, 2018, 08:06:07 PM
The wire harness kits Detlef supplied are great but there were a few components missing: the starter button harness, light switch harness and the signal light harness.

The starter button is just two lengths of brown wire, one end to the fuse box with the ignition 'on' side of the box and the other end to the starter relay.

(https://i.postimg.cc/yYbGHwZt/IMG-1428.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/G3JrbhLN/IMG-1426.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

added some pvc sheathing (I get it from British Wiring in the USA along with multi-colour wire and crimp connectors)

https://www.britishwiring.com/

(https://i.postimg.cc/1tXyDJdF/IMG-1626.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

A zip tie and it should start when the button is pressed

Benelli used a common CEV signal light switch on the left handlebar, I found a new one on Ebay

(https://i.postimg.cc/2jH2HTK6/IMG-1639.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Again this CEV switch has machine screw wire fastening, nice touch, and its labeled Left (S) and right (D) Big chunky switch, should be easy to use

Now the CEV light switch is another beast altogether, I have ruined these in the past trying to solder wires to the brass lugs. I use electrical conductive epoxy, its very pricey but you only need a couple dabs

(https://i.postimg.cc/k5rjQ4hv/IMG-1638.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

The original switch on the left had the power wire from the flasher re-soldered and the plastic melted and warped the connection, ruined!

Just a couple more electrical jobs to make up the signal light connections and to connect the brake light switches, hopefully all of the electrical will work.

I also found some original spec spark plugs on Ebay

Benelli Bauer found me a pair of front signal light stems and the rear brake pull rod, the last two hard to find parts I need!
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 06, 2018, 07:40:30 PM
I finished with the wiring today with the exception of hooking up the front signal lights once the stems come in from Germany.


Spaghetti junction like the Moto Morini the folks in Pessaro chose to use individual wire harness components for each system, it seems busy but the more I work with this type of electrical the more I like it, easy to install, easy to trace faults, no big multi wire harness to contend with. The Benelli Tornado use the same type of CEV fuse box as the Moto Guzzi V7 Sport and the Moto Morini 350 / 500 twins.

(https://i.postimg.cc/RF2qFk0h/IMG-1628.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

For the rear signal lights I used a modern single wire quick connector

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1629_zps7c4hsh6l.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1629_zps7c4hsh6l.jpg.html)

Foe the signal flasher I used a Moto Guzzi rubber flasher holder and just slipped it around the bracket that carries the regulator, looks like it could have been stock

The conductive electrical epoxy set up over night so I could finish installing the light switch and hook up the final headlamp connections

(https://i.postimg.cc/pV9FHZdy/IMG-1630.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

A package came from EuroCarb with new V11 needles of the VHB 29 carbs,  the Benelli carbs do not have accelerator pumps like those used by Moto Guzzi on the V7 Sport, Eldorado etc, I had Guzzi type needles in, V9 I think, the V11 are much shorter, new jets and gaskets were included to freshen up the carbs

(http://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1641_zpsk1pzaxac.jpg) (http://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1641_zpsk1pzaxac.jpg.html)

Silent block fitted to the front of the gas tank

(https://i.postimg.cc/7ZSRQ0zW/IMG-1644.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/7Zr7X2wh/IMG-1642.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I saved the original foam tank pad, need to glue it to the underside of the gas tank

(https://i.postimg.cc/qqBDN5Zf/IMG-1643.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

And the tank strap now in place

(https://i.postimg.cc/x8yR3yhv/IMG-1645.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Installed the used vent hose rubber clip

(https://i.postimg.cc/kgwHm9jQ/IMG-1646.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I need to remove this little tab from the old brake lever perch and braze it onto the new perch, this tab holds the front brake light switch

(https://i.postimg.cc/yxXM3RT5/IMG-1650.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Should have noticed this before I installed the brake lever

This is how the perch / brake switch looked when I got the bike, there is a cylindrical stud that fastens into the round cable recess under the brake lever and makes contact with the brake pressure witch, pull the brake lever and the switch plunger opens and the brake light comes on. I was wondering what that strange stub in my parts box was for!



Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Huzo on December 06, 2018, 08:56:44 PM
I should be inspired by this sort of thing, but it just makes me realise I'm not made of the right stuff to do a proper restoration.
You blokes remind me of the fellas that build their own gliders from wood. They're the sort of blokes that could build a piano if they wanted to.
I'm in awe...
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on December 06, 2018, 09:35:25 PM

This is how the perch / brake switch looked when I got the bike, there is a cylindrical stud that fastens into the round cable recess under the brake lever and makes contact with the brake pressure witch, pull the brake lever and the switch plunger opens and the brake light comes on. I was wondering what that strange stub in my parts box was for!

(https://i249.photobucket.com/albums/gg217/canuck750/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1357_zpsie6pjnjb.jpg) (https://s249.photobucket.com/user/canuck750/media/1974%20Benelli%20650S%20Tornado/IMG_1357_zpsie6pjnjb.jpg.html)

This is also the same as the early Morini 3 1/2 Sport set-up. If you need a switch, Magura makes one that works perfectly, I bought it on Amazon for $12.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 07, 2018, 09:30:40 AM
This is also the same as the early Morini 3 1/2 Sport set-up. If you need a switch, Magura makes one that works perfectly, I bought it on Amazon for $12.

Thanks Charlie,
good to know,
I need to take a look at my Morini 3 1/2 to see if it has this switch, a different take on a brake light switch compared to the Guzzi in-line cable device.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 07, 2018, 09:59:19 AM
I should be inspired by this sort of thing, but it just makes me realise I'm not made of the right stuff to do a proper restoration.
You blokes remind me of the fellas that build their own gliders from wood. They're the sort of blokes that could build a piano if they wanted to.
I'm in awe...

Its not rocket science trust me! If you are interested in getting into restorations get a hold of a small displacement Honda such as a S90 or Step-through from the 60's, simple bikes that are not too big of a project to get frustrated with and parts supply is excellent plus you get something iconic to enjoy once you are finished.my first restoration was a 1965 Honda S65, I broke more than I fixed, had to rebuild the motor three times until I figured it out, spent weeks trying to lace the wheels etc.... I really learned a lot and got hooked on turning crud back to life.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 07, 2018, 11:39:54 AM
The upholstery repair shop just delivered the restored Benelli seat, I think they did a great job.

(https://i.postimg.cc/zf3WXrtD/IMG-1652.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/Mc2XdhJg)

the torn front area was reinforced from behind with a very durable mesh fabric, all the holes patched from behind, vinyl stained black.

(https://i.postimg.cc/2yNBwBz3/IMG-1655.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/ZBjRYnvh)

The shop did their best to replicate the chrome plastic band, not the shine of plastic chrome but a heck of an improvement on the raw green plastic.

(https://i.postimg.cc/JnkkZQC9/IMG-1653.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/MMzH8VTD)

If anyone knows where to find the CEV tail light red reflector inserts please let me know.




Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: mcdammitt on December 10, 2018, 04:36:47 PM
Very nice restoration, wow.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 13, 2018, 07:36:44 PM
Benelli Bauer came through with a swing arm jamb nut

(https://i.postimg.cc/MpXLqNgg/IMG-1682.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

And he also sent me a new rear brake pull rod, a real nice used chain guard and this pair of NOS front signal light stems, they still had the part label on them

(https://i.postimg.cc/ZK1XLbN2/IMG-1718.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/fJfHzhBf)

Glad I didn't have to make up a facsimile of these

(https://i.postimg.cc/prx7vTtB/IMG-1684.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

and the restored cast aluminum signal light body clamps over the stem

(https://i.postimg.cc/52XNX2Vr/IMG-1702.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/YvwwVkjN)

Now I can finish off the wiring

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 14, 2018, 02:51:00 PM
I am looking for a pair of red rear side reflectors for my 650 Benelli, they fit into a recess in the rear tail light bracket.

44mm x 25mm (1 3/4" x 1"), stick on would work or the original CEV bolt on.

Also looking for a pair of the CEV bolt on front amber side reflectors, these were fitted to some Benelli 650S Tornado depending upon market.

They are the same as these ones on my 1972 Benelli 180 Enduro

Any help finding these is greatly appreciated!

Thanks

Jim
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 15, 2018, 05:27:34 PM
Finishing the signal lights, 1st to drill out a broken off lens screw, 4mm x .75 tapped

Terminate the wires, add a ground wire to each lamp body and the lighting is done.

Heated up the broken brake lever perch and melted the silver solder to free the switch tab and brazed the old tab onto the new perch

Brake light switch in place

Swapped the new chain guard over



And fitted a pair of new petcocks with the clear sediment bowl, similar to the original type used by Benelli but not an exact match, the male hoase nipple is a lot smaller O.D. than the fitting on the carb, need to figure out what to do about that to make one size of hose fit a small and large nipple at the same time ???

I tried to fit the brake pull rod that came in the mail

But the brake lever arm I got a couple months ago does not fit the splines of the rear brake cam shaft that is 13mm

The arm I have is only 10mm, must have been for a smaller Benelli

Looks like the brake arm on my 72 Moto Guzzi has a 13mm spline and the arm looks like it will work, I know I have one in my Guzzi stash
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on December 16, 2018, 12:24:03 AM
Have been out of the loop for a while, my wife gave birth to our second child this thursday, so lots of things going on.

Just wanted to say that the bike looks amazing. And it is fantastic to think of how it looked when you got it and how it looks now! That is some transformation for sure!

-Ulrik
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 16, 2018, 10:06:04 AM
Have been out of the loop for a while, my wife gave birth to our second child this thursday, so lots of things going on.

-Ulrik

Congratulations on the birth of your second child! Life just got twice as busy and twice the fun for you!
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 16, 2018, 03:41:47 PM
Moto Guzzi parts to the rescue! The Guzzi Eldorado rear brake arm fits onto the Benelli brake plate shaft and the shape of the Guzzi part works with the Benelli geometry.

Benelli fitted this little steel stud with rubber cushion as a brake pedal stop, nice detail.

And under the seat attached to the shock upper mount bolt is this simple helmet hanger that secures the helmet once the seat latch is locked

(https://i.postimg.cc/qBKFvfSG/IMG-1720.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/149Bvd9g)

The To Do List is getting pretty short;

clutch lever (Wolfgang Haerter is supplying one),
install clutch cable,
install headlight,
side reflectors (still looking),
install side stand (coming form Italy - I hope..),
weld a tab onto the centre stand,
get a key cut for seat latch,
replace points and condensers,
adjust valves and install rocker cover O rings,
check the electrical,
fill the engine with oil,
add gas,
cross fingers,
press start.


Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 18, 2018, 06:07:58 PM
I was not able to find an original rubber battery tray so I opted for a battery mat from MG Cycle, just trim to fit with scissors and peel off the paper over the self adhesive backing,

(https://i.postimg.cc/PrRdnnwQ/IMG-1724.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/XpdR9hxr)

MG Cycle sent a new headlight

And the side stand came in from Italy, the bracket was with the bike but the pin that the stand slides over was broken off.

I made a new pin out of steel stock in the lathe and cut a groove for a circlip like the original had

(https://i.postimg.cc/1XyDSNb2/IMG-1728.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/S2tn7jSf)

(https://i.postimg.cc/mDHmkMXr/IMG-1730.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/HcTwPJCG)

Now to just weld the pin to the bracket and give it a shot of black paint + find a side stand spring that will work

Couple more jobs off the list.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 23, 2018, 02:48:02 PM
A new clutch lever came in the mail Friday from Wolfgang Haerter in Nakusp B.C.

The new clutch cable I got from Germany does not have the correct end for the lever, this will have to do for now until I find another cable

(https://i.postimg.cc/7YGZ6LDW/IMG-1758.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/dLFYNwh2)

The cable winds its way around the left side of the motor passing through two cable guides

Then through the top of the crankcase passing through a lug before ending at the clutch arm and a pinch fitting holds it in place. finished with a little rubber end cap silicone in place


I scanned the break in instruction out of the owners manual and had a repro decal made for the tank, its the same size as the decal that was on the tank, handy

(https://i.postimg.cc/t4gQTShC/IMG-1759.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/D8RYpcjt)

Glare from the lights overhead and the camera makes the decal hard to read in the picture, it actually looks fine on the tank

Just waiting on the tiny Made In Italy decal to come in the mail, the tri-colour decal site behind the break in decal and finishes off the job.


Setting the points, timing etc is next.

Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Petrus Rocks on December 24, 2018, 02:24:02 PM
really enjoyed your restoration!  I'm in the process of rebuilding a Norton 850 and see many similarities in the builds.  However mine was in nicer shape with little rust.  You are going the extra mile with the myriad of details!  I hope you post a video  when running.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: F-22 on December 28, 2018, 02:58:23 AM
Possibly, the reflectors for your tail light are the same as fitted to later plastic chromed US-export CEV turn signals (I think mostly on Moto Guzzi, but probably also used by others). I think they screw on just like that.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 28, 2018, 10:45:39 AM
Possibly, the reflectors for your tail light are the same as fitted to later plastic chromed US-export CEV turn signals (I think mostly on Moto Guzzi, but probably also used by others). I think they screw on just like that.

I will take a look, I think I have one of those CEV signal lights in a box somewhere

Thanks

Jim
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Antietam Classic Cycle on December 28, 2018, 06:17:58 PM
I will take a look, I think I have one of those CEV signal lights in a box somewhere

Thanks

Jim

Those are considerably larger than what you need. I thought I'd found the answer: '73 & '74 H-D/Aermacchi Sprint has reflectors on either side of the headlight - although they seem to be about the right size, they're the wrong color (amber).
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 28, 2018, 08:38:06 PM
Those are considerably larger than what you need. I thought I'd found the answer: '73 & '74 H-D/Aermacchi Sprint has reflectors on either side of the headlight - although they seem to be about the right size, they're the wrong color (amber).

I often check Ebay for Aermacchi signal lights, for a couple years Aermacchi used the same cast aluminum CEV signal lights as the Benelli 650 Tornado. I have been looking at all kinds of brands including small displacement Moto Morini, Guzzi, other Benelli bikes, etc.... still can't find anything close, I sent measurements and pictures of the CEV tail light bracket depressions for the red reflectors to the Laverda parts guru Wolfgang Haerter and to Detlef Burian, still no luck.

I think they will turn up, everything else I thought I may never find seems to pop up unexpectantly one day.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on December 31, 2018, 06:18:07 PM
a small detail hardly anyone will ever see, the CEV clear plastic fuse box lid is almost always missing or broken. Eurortrash Jambalaya sells complete CEV fuse boxes on Ebay and a clear lid can be taken from a new one but a couple years ago I tried casting my own copy with a latex mold and clear urethane, its very hard to get the air bubbles out of the resin in the mold without a vacuum chamber, the results are just OK and since this part will not be readily visible it will do. I photocopied the CEV coloured card from my V7 Sport fuse box and laminated the colour copy to a thin card board.

(https://i.postimg.cc/cJBwj4XW/IMG-1794.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

A couple retainer clips to hold the colour card like the original system

(https://i.postimg.cc/pdC5CcLX/IMG-1795.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Air bubble not as noticeable when the colour card is mounted inside the cover

And back in its final position under the seat

(https://i.postimg.cc/8zHR5mrW/IMG-1797.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I adjusted the valves, fitted the rocker cover O rings and set the points, finished the fuel lines, just need to add oil to the engine and forks.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on January 02, 2019, 05:17:55 AM
Looking great Jim!

Very cool that you cast the fuse box lid yourself! I think a quick and dirty vacuum pot could be made of a strong paint bucket and a ejector style air fitting. It will obviously not be able to pull down to -0.9 bar or something like that. But I think it would be possible to pull the airbubbles out with less. Might be worth a try. A piece of pipe with ends closed could also be used.

I do agree though that the air bubbles are not so visible when the colour card is in. And it is under the seat, so it would probably not be worth fighting with.


So only oil is left?! post up some completed pictures! and then you just have to wait till winters over?
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on January 02, 2019, 07:49:40 PM
Very cool that you cast the fuse box lid yourself! I think a quick and dirty vacuum pot could be made of a strong paint bucket and a ejector style air fitting. It will obviously not be able to pull down to -0.9 bar or something like that. But I think it would be possible to pull the airbubbles out with less. Might be worth a try. A piece of pipe with ends closed could also be used.

To make a vacuum bottle can I just put the resin filled mold into a sealed container with a spigot attached to a shop vacuum and run the shop vac? I would like to get better results with the clear lids, need to make a couple more for my Moto Morini fuse panel lids.

PS - yes to the fluids, just oil and fork oil, the Italian "Made In Italy' decals came in the mail today along with new points, condensers and the correct front axle nut to finish it all off. I am showing the Benelli and the Moto Morini 500 in the vintage display at this years International Motorcycle Show when it rolls into town a week from this coming Friday.

Thanks

Jim
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on January 04, 2019, 08:09:55 PM
The original signal lamp lens screws were either missing or the Philips heads were mostly rounded out as a result of corroded screws and aluminum signal light bodies. Thee CEV signal lights take a 3.5mm screw, fine thread, NOT AN EASY THING TO FIND!
Aermaccchi / Harley Davidson used the same signal lights for a brief period and searching the Aermacchi / HD Ebay pages turned up a NOS packet of screws, 8 came in this little packet, just the right amount needed.

(https://i.postimg.cc/xCDYkMmG/IMG-1819.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

Repro MADE IN ITALY decals arrived, I made a measurement of the original decal placement before I had the tank repainted, 22 cm from the back folded lip to the base of the decal

(https://i.postimg.cc/jdyQVbxM/IMG-1803.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

I am a sucker for little details like this, IMHO they 'make' the bike. they cost so little in the great scheme of things but I always notice a corroded fastener or a missing decal on otherwise very nice restorations.

(https://i.postimg.cc/3r0JxrDF/IMG-1813.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on January 05, 2019, 07:37:42 AM
To make a vacuum bottle can I just put the resin filled mold into a sealed container with a spigot attached to a shop vacuum and run the shop vac? I would like to get better results with the clear lids, need to make a couple more for my Moto Morini fuse panel lids.

Thanks

Jim

I definitely think that it is worth a shot. Any vacuum must be better than no vacuum, I would believe that it would take a bit longer to pull out all air bubbles from the mix with a weaker vacuum, but never the less it should help extracting the air. How long is the working time on the resin after mixing?

I saw a video on youtube where they are casting a replacement headlight glass for an old 1936 Cadillac and the vacuum pot they are using looks like nothing more than a piece of thick walled pvc pipe (edit: it's a steel pipe) with a thick piece of acrylic on top and sealed by rubber gaskets. I'll try and see if I can find a link. It looks like a doable setup in the home shop.

Found it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMe9MOBjkmc
It goes through all the steps of making the casting, but it is the vacuum pot I thought was interesting.

-Ulrik
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on January 05, 2019, 03:26:30 PM
I definitely think that it is worth a shot. Any vacuum must be better than no vacuum, I would believe that it would take a bit longer to pull out all air bubbles from the mix with a weaker vacuum, but never the less it should help extracting the air. How long is the working time on the resin after mixing?

I saw a video on youtube where they are casting a replacement headlight glass for an old 1936 Cadillac and the vacuum pot they are using looks like nothing more than a piece of thick walled pvc pipe (edit: it's a steel pipe) with a thick piece of acrylic on top and sealed by rubber gaskets. I'll try and see if I can find a link. It looks like a doable setup in the home shop.

Found it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QMe9MOBjkmc
It goes through all the steps of making the casting, but it is the vacuum pot I thought was interesting.

-Ulrik


Thanks Rick!  The resin set-up time is well over an hour, very slow reaction. I am going to rig something up along the lines of your suggestion, hopefully the casting results will be much better.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: SED on January 05, 2019, 09:39:34 PM
Beautiful work - again!  Have fun at the show.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on January 10, 2019, 09:49:21 AM
Hi Jim,

Just to follow up on the diy vacuum pot, I just found a video of a guy making one with an old fridge compressor and a kitchen pot. He is able to pull - 0.9 Bar vacuum so it obviously works very well! Just another idea on how to make one.

Here's a link
https://youtu.be/BeiW_37rS-U

-Ulrik
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on January 10, 2019, 08:16:44 PM
Hi Jim,

Just to follow up on the diy vacuum pot, I just found a video of a guy making one with an old fridge compressor and a kitchen pot. He is able to pull - 0.9 Bar vacuum so it obviously works very well! Just another idea on how to make one.

Here's a link
https://youtu.be/BeiW_37rS-U

-Ulrik


Thanks !!

I am going to make one!
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: canuck750 on January 18, 2019, 09:47:25 AM
Last weekend the International Motorcycle Show came through Edmonton as part of the North American tour. I organized the local vintage motorcycle show as part of the Canadian Vintage Motorcycle Group - NORAL section. We had space for twenty motorcycles and a wide cross section of years and makes was shown.

I was very happy to show two bikes I finished last year, the Moto-Morini 500 and the Benelli 650. Both got a lot of attention but for interest the Benelli was the winner of the two. Many people asked about the Benelli, very few knew anything about it and I did not meet one person who had ever seen one.

(https://i.postimg.cc/65Y9H7sw/IMG-1820.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/0jZqH4BZ/IMG-1821.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/XNBd6bjT/IMG-1817.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)

(https://i.postimg.cc/CLYqnDPQ/IMG-1651.jpg) (https://postimg.cc/CdP1WZVG)

(https://i.postimg.cc/hGhRZML1/IMG-1815.jpg) (https://postimages.org/)
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Rick4003 on January 19, 2019, 09:34:55 AM
Great looking bikes both of them. And I have to agree with the  crowd at the show. I had heard about and seen the Moto Morini before, and while having heard and known about Benelli bikes I had never seen the 650 model you have. In any case it is a great looking bike after you have had your hands on it. Thinking of how it looked when you picked it up it has been quite a transformation.
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Bucky on January 20, 2019, 05:59:55 AM
Another fabulous resurrection....out standing!
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Mayor_of_BBQ on January 31, 2021, 10:14:25 AM
To make a vacuum bottle can I just put the resin filled mold into a sealed container with a spigot attached to a shop vacuum and run the shop vac? I would like to get better results with the clear lids, need to make a couple more for my Moto Morini fuse panel lids.

PS - yes to the fluids, just oil and fork oil, the Italian "Made In Italy' decals came in the mail today along with new points, condensers and the correct front axle nut to finish it all off. I am showing the Benelli and the Moto Morini 500 in the vintage display at this years International Motorcycle Show when it rolls into town a week from this coming Friday.

Thanks

Jim

My friend who makes resin jewelry places her molds on top of her running clothes dryer to vibrate out the bubbles
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Canuck750 on January 31, 2021, 10:41:04 AM
My friend who makes resin jewelry places her molds on top of her running clothes dryer to vibrate out the bubbles

That is a great idea!!  I love simple solutions like that, going to give that a go. Thanks
Title: Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
Post by: Mayor_of_BBQ on February 02, 2021, 07:55:35 AM
She says "Its a nice warm spot and it seems to work better if the dryer is empty"

(I guess the weight of wet clothes in the dryer dampens the high frequency vibrations)

Good luck!