Author Topic: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission  (Read 2935 times)

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I am restoring this bike to as authentic and presentable as practically possible.



I did some basic stuff this past winter (oil changes, brake pads, tires, battery...).  I drove it for about 100 miles and then the gears broke.
There were also idling problems, getting stuck at 4000rpm.  Pulling the choke slightly reduced it to 2000rpm (later about leaky carb floats).
I also see the Motoplat ignition modules are unplugged and there are some ugly looking ignition coils under the tank that I want to understand better.

After moping for a week I decided to take it apart to have the gear box serviced.  I took lots of pictures, hoping to remember how to put it
back together.  I thought I would share some and maybe they will help someone someday.

This post gave me the guts to take on the work: https://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=58695.0
Other similar info on Greg Bender's site gave me great examples.
Thank you!

I started with the intention of just crabbing the frame enough to get at the box and not disconnect too much.  I used a bike jack under the engine,
which makes the bike rock between the wheels.   Then, I tied straps from the back of the bike to the garage ceiling.  This makes the front wheel
rock down, so I don't need to removed it like I saw done elsewhere (thisoldtractor web site).




The disassembly sequence below is how I went about it and there are probably more clever ways of doing it.  Sometimes I did things that could have been done later with easier access, but sometimes at the end of the day, I was looking for things to accomplish.
If I were to do it over, I might simplify it.  However, I don't want to deviate to avoid confusing future readers.
Let's roll...

Disconnect the fuel hoses at the tank and remove the tank.
Disconnect the breather hoses from the heads.  I had to replace them, one was cracked.
Remove the mufflers and rear pegs
Disconnect the negative terminal of the battery (much simpler than positive) and tape it up
Remove the starter motor (couple hex bolts and two wires)
Disconnect the rear brake rod from the pedal  (arrow below).
Remove the rear brake caliper (2 hex bolts again) and hang it to the bike frame.  I put a few wooden shims between the pads before sliding it off the rotor.

Loosen the 3 frame bolts below the battery tray, but don't remove them yet.




At the front of the frame remove the bottom bolt and loosen the top bolt.  Do the left side as well and remove the crash bar (it has two more bolts below the tank).




Unscrew the air box bracket, between the cylinders.  I didn't notice this at first and the bracket bent a little.




Remove the cap nuts at the swing arm, 30mm.




Measure how much the swing pin sticks out, both sides.  Then turn it to see how tight it is.  Mine was about 6.8mm on both sides and it turned almost half a turn before it bottomed out.




Loosen the clutch cable clamp and pull out the whole cable.  You can do this later too.  I later realized that this is not as built, so I will be looking for a new clutch cable, besides, the jacket is in bad shape.



upload pic


Unscrew the gas intake fitting and slider cap on the carburetor and gently set it aside.  On the left carb, the gas fitting can be disconnected only after the carb is out.




Remove the carburetors.  You can choose not to remove the carbs, but mine were filthy from years of leaded gas.  Loosen the clamps and wiggle them out from the back first.
Careful not to flip the carburetors, the bowl is likely full of gas.




Disconnect the choke cable.  Set the carb aside for later.




At this point you are almost ready to lift the top frame.  Make sure the frame is supported well.  I ended up tying the front and rear with straps for more stability and to spread the weight on the ceiling.




Disconnect the rear shocks and swing them up, out of the way.  Notice the spacer behind the shocker mounting hole.  There is no spacer on the right shock.




Remove the three frame bolts below the battery tray.   The lower bolts that tie the frame bars at the front shpuld already be out.
You are ready to lift.




To be continued soon.


« Last Edit: August 14, 2019, 11:49:59 PM by Pescatore »
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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I need to make a correction.  I did not remove the bottom bolt frame in the front, but the top one (brown arrow).
Here is the top frame fully... crabbed.


'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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The next step is to remove the rear tire and the swing arm.
I did that in reverse and regretted it.  The tire being still attached to the final drive and swing arm makes it really cumbersome to disassemble further.
So, at this point remove the rear tire and support the final drive.  Don't let it drop when the tire is removed.

Next, remove the final drive from the swing arm by undoing the four cap nuts.




Then, remove the pin bolts and pull off the swing arm.  Keep track of the spacer washer on the left [EDIT: right] side of the swing arm.  It goes between the swing bearing and the swing arm.




Now that the rear of the engine is accessible, disconnect the clutch cable, I already had.
Don't lose the spring that goes in the hole at the bottom of the clutch arm.
Don't forget to take out the nuts for the frame bolts. 




Remove the cotter pin that holds the shift pedal and disconnect the shift rod.




Remove the long frame bolt at the front and the lower frame bolt (circled).  I said to remove the circled one before... I lied, but it's fine either way.




I ended up loosening the exhaust pipes.  The short pipe that connects the two long pipes in the middle seemed to be in the way of removing the gear box.  It might not be necessary.
Now the bottom frame will swing down.




Disconnect the neutral switch cable and the gear box breather hose.




Undo the 6 hex bolts that hold the gear box to the engine.
Unplug the thin black hose from the bottom of the air box and the thick one from the valve breather box behind the steering column.




Before removing all the bolts, support the gear box with a wood block and pull it off the engine.




And there it is.  Time to clean it up a bit.



« Last Edit: September 14, 2019, 11:36:32 PM by Pescatore »
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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I cleaned the gear box and removed the breather nipple, which was clogged.
At this point I decided that opening the gear box is beyond my skills.  Besides, I don't have the tools to unlock the bolt for the clutch housing.
Another tool is also needed to open the gear box.  I have plenty left to do anyway.

Here is the inside of the drive shaft, in the order they came out.




I removed the drive shaft boot to clean everything.




I took everything to AJ Cycle in Gill, MA.  They opened it up a few days ago and told me the spring had snapped (61238200).
Waiting for Harper to send new spring and gaskets.  It should be all fixed in a week or so.

I went back in my garage, looking at the mess I made.  Will I be able to put everything back together?  I have hours of video, but it's all a blur.
Staring at it some more, I notice there is grime everywhere.  Maybe I should take out the engine to clean it, it's just a couple more bolts.
And what's this spark plug wire all about?  Where is the connector?  Why are the ignition coils hanging on tie wraps?  :undecided:




I know the carburetors have a problem.  Let's open them up.
Here is one, all cleaned up with all new o-rings, fuel screen and float needle.




It's not easy to see in the picture, but these floats have gas in them.  Maybe that's what causes the acceleration.
I ordered new floats and for the same part number they sent me 6.5grams floats.  I have all stock jets (38/60/105/268, 3rd tack), so I also wanted to keep the same weight of 9.5grams.
After searching online I discovered there is a substitute part AP8106782.  According to Rick at MG Cycle, the weight had been
switching over the years.  It seems Guzzi is back to 9.5grams with this Aprilia part number.

The choke jet above has no o-ring yet.  It took some patience to put a new one on because it was really snug.  It feels like I have the wrong o-ring,
but the original was also snug.

Next task will be to take down the bottom frame rails and drag the engine out.
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi


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Waiting for the gear box to be repaired, I contemplate the difference between crabbing the frame and just carting away the top.  Being this my first experience,
I didnít want to disconnect too much for the fear of not knowing how to rebuild it.  It does take less space in my 1car garage (filled with crap), not having to set
aside the top frame.  It certainly would be nice to clean the grime on the engine, now that itís almost out.  Dare I think to repaint it?



free photo uploading


Well, I removed the bottom frame bolts in the front and the bottom frame rails come off, along with kick stands.  I take out the exhaust pipes, I disconnected the
ignition coils, spark plug wires, oil sump hose, tach cable, oil pressure wire and I rolled away the engine from under the frame.  This is a rite of passage for me.




Lots of grime, corroded fins and the paint is flaking off.  If I wash it, the paint will look even worse.  If I go the paint stripper route, Iíll never ride this summer.

I noticed one exhaust hole has a ton of carbon build up (the side with the broken coil wire) and the other doesnít.  This bike was built to run on leaded gas. 
I think I first need to check the plugs/timing/carbs before I clean that out.
Also, I need to research the Motoplat ignition that is disconnected.  The connector housing for the coils has a burn mark.  Looks like it overheated.  I read
something in Guzziology about bad ignitions.  This is sounding like a good winter project.
I think once I put the gear box back on, a light was will do for this time.  If I need to open the cylinder, I will think about repainting then.

'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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The exhaust pipes are covered in rust and there was a hole that spit out soot all over the frame.  I welded the hole shut and that will do
it for now. 



I applied a rust removed gel to the pipes.  It took some rust off, but they still look bad.  I have read about blasting them and painting
them, but I don't think the usual black will look good on this bike.




The pipes donít fit snug with the silencers.  My other bike has a compression mesh gasket here, but the parts list (and other Guzzi models) donít
show anything like that.  I see there is something inside the silencer.  If I don't make this snug, the exhaust will keep corroding the pipe outer wall.
Has anyone had this problem?  Iíll check with other bike shops.




The clutch handle was patched together with rivets.  I got a new clutch body from Stein-Dinse and just used the handle.  I need to cut off
the grips to replace the whole clutch body... a good winter project, and I need to find new ones before I slice these off.
Unfortunately, the clutch cable is not original and the cable head doesnít fit in the lever. In fact, the old handle has been sliced to make the
cable fit.  I cannot find a replacement cable.  For now, I will try grinding down the head of the cable.



'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
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Online Chuck in Indiana

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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2019, 06:55:43 AM »
First.. I've never seen this model.  :thumb: It's all standard old small block stuff though.
Quote
I contemplate the difference between crabbing the frame and just carting away the top. 
IMHO, it's considerably easier to wheelbarrow the frame/front end assembly away, leaving the motive unit sitting on "the box."
Quote
Keep track of the spacer washer on the left side of the swing arm.  It goes between the swing bearing and the swing arm.
Yours may have been assembled incorrectly. The spacer locates the swing arm, and is on the right side of the swing arm.
Reassemble like this:
Start the left locating screw into the swing arm. Slide the spacer between the swing arm and frame on the right side. Start the right side pin in so the swing arm is now located between the pins. Screw the left in until the swing arm is snug, but free to move. Tighten the jam nut. Then, screw in the right pin until it just pulls everything together, but the swing arm is still free to move. Tighten that jam nut. Easy peasey. No measuring.  :smiley:
Chuck in (Elwood) Indiana/sometimes SoCal

02 Scura RC
87 AeroLario
79 G5
95 Skorpion tour
 
I think senility is going to be a fairly smooth transition for me..

Online Chuck in Indiana

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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2019, 07:05:25 AM »
Quote
I cannot find a replacement cable.  For now, I will try grinding down the head of the cable.
that is probably not a good idea.  :grin: Measure the length of the cable, and MG Cycle will have it, I imagine. About all Guzzi stuff is standard between models. Since this bike has been worked on by one of Pete's "shaved apes," make sure the cable in it is of the correct length, first.
Quote
I need to cut off
the grips to replace the whole clutch body..
Generally, you can inject high pressure air under the end of the grip. It will balloon, and you can slide it off. Not so if it's been glued down, though.. :wink:
Chuck in (Elwood) Indiana/sometimes SoCal

02 Scura RC
87 AeroLario
79 G5
95 Skorpion tour
 
I think senility is going to be a fairly smooth transition for me..

Online Pescatore

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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #8 on: September 14, 2019, 11:32:09 PM »
Thanks for reading, Chuck.
I read in Guzziology that this bike is a restyled V65.  Standard small block stuff, but longer forks and 18" wheels.  They made a 350 and 1000cc version:
https://motorcyclespecs.co.za/model/moto%20guzzi/moto_guzzi_v65%20gt%2087.htm
I read elsewhere that these models were not exported to the US and was an effort by Guzzi in the late 80s to generate some cash.  Apparently it worked for my father,
who bought one in 1991 for 8,000,000 Lire.  I had it shipped to the US to continue the legacy.

I kind of agree with the wheel barrow method, now that I have done it.  Crabbing was my away of telling myself I could do this.  However, you have to have the space to set aside the top.

You are right about the swing arm spacer.  I wrote left, but it was on the right side (will edit).  I read your thread about this, so I won't mess it up.

About the clutch cable, I was on the phone with Rick from MG Cycle for at least half an hour.  He was extremely helpful, but in the end could not find a cable that fits.  I did grind down the head of the
cable without exposing the steel wire and got it to fit. 


Later on I had to order a new nut for the gear box (10054100) from Stein-Dinse (Harper wants $123).  So I also got a new clutch cable.

Thanks for the tip on the grips.  These grips are so old that they hardened.  We'll see how it goes.
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #9 on: September 15, 2019, 12:02:23 AM »
While waiting for the gear box parts, I washed the engine with Simple Green.  I used the spray bottle without diluting and waited a few minutes before rinsing with water.
It took away all the grime and did not compromise the paint.
This engine really needs to be media blasted and possibly repainted.  It's not difficult to find shops that will do it.  My hangup is what paint and color to use, if any at all.
I would like to restore it to the original milky-gray color.  There is some corrosion on the fins, so I think leaving it bare will make it corrode even more.




I also found a mesh gasket for the exhaust pipes.  They are used on the V7, P/N:91113826.
MG Cycle carries it. http://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=advanced_search_result&search_in_descripti on=1&keyword=91113826
They seem to fit snug, but the real test will be when I fire up the engine.
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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Almost a year has gone by with slow progress.
I had the bottom frame rails, the swing arm and the kick stand parts blasted and powder coated.

I could not get anyone to blast the paint on the assembled engine, not even soda blasted.
So I decided to strip the paint the hard way, with Rust- Oleum Aircraft Remover.
I covered up all the holes, swing bearing, shaft drive, etc.  Masking tape works well and does not break down with the paint stripper.
Gorilla tape is more robust, so I switched to that later on.

The spray can worked great, when it worked.  It makes the stripper foam up and does a great job between the fins.
However, after a while it doesn't spray a nice stream, it starts spitting.  Anyway, I also got the can and started painting it all over the engine.




Final drive too.




I go around in circles, as I treat one area, I cover it with a plastic bag while I scrape another area.

The transmission box is all clean now.
I found a lot of stains under the paint, even where the paint looked fine.  I tried blasting one area with baking soda, but it doesn't remove the stains.




A bit more work on the fins.  They might not come completely clean.




After all the paint is off, I am going to soda blast it with a small gun.  It works well to remove stubborn paint deposits.
I was thinking of protecting the engine with a cleat coat, but with all these stains I will probably have to use paint.

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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
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Online Chuck in Indiana

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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #11 on: August 14, 2020, 06:10:04 PM »
Everybody will look and say, "Looks good." Unless you've *done it,* those hours of labor go unnoticed.  :smiley:
Looks good.  :cool: :grin:
Chuck in (Elwood) Indiana/sometimes SoCal

02 Scura RC
87 AeroLario
79 G5
95 Skorpion tour
 
I think senility is going to be a fairly smooth transition for me..

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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #12 on: August 16, 2020, 12:24:37 PM »
Thanks, Chuck.  And now that I've done it, I would not attempt it ever again.
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #13 on: August 16, 2020, 01:04:54 PM »
All the paint is off, except for some surface residue deep inside the fins.  The blasting does not reach well between the fins.
It's not noticeable and I ran out of stripper, so that's as far as I will go.
Paint stripping with chemicals was really nasty, it might have taken a few years off my life. 
The soda blasting gun worked really well, provided I waited for the compressor to recharge.  It needs at least 10scfm to keep
a decent pace.  I got 5@90, blast 45 seconds, wait 2 minutes.








The stains are really ugly, but I have decided not to paint it just because it's easier to keep the bare metal clean.
I tried using a wire wheel to get them off.  I went though 5 wheels, and it's a slow process again.
Vapor blasting is interesting.  I realized that many posters here leave it bare after doing that.  I think glass peening imparts
some protection to the metal because it doesn't pit like sand does.
It sounds scary, but I just want to "erase" some of the visible stains.  I would not blast the top end.  If I ever need to replace the
gaskets, I will take both heads off and have them vapor blasted.

So I have been searching for people willing to vapor blast the engine assembled.  Most shops around here (MA) have small blast
cabinets and can't fit the whole engine.  I found a company in CT, but too expensive.

I already got the gun, so I'll give dry glass bead blasting a try.  It won't give the same finish as the wet slurry, but I could buff it later... maybe?
'91 Sessantacinque GT
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Online Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #14 on: August 16, 2020, 06:38:54 PM »
Home-brewed vapor blasting set-up. Check out the rig "scudman" shows in this thread (1st page, about 1/3 the way down).
https://advrider.com/f/threads/scudman-gets-another-guzzi-project.1456684/

I think this may have been the kit he bought: https://www.amazon.com/Angela-Alex-Sandblasting-Sandblaster-Attachment/dp/B0856QHK8H
« Last Edit: August 16, 2020, 06:53:48 PM by Antietam Classic Cycle »
Charlie
http://www.AntietamClassicCycle.com
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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #15 on: August 18, 2020, 11:14:28 PM »
Aaaah, yes, the Angela&Alex kit.
Hello Charlie, thanks for reading!  :bow:
I received that same attachment this weekend and tested it out.  I don't have a strong enough pressure washer.
The soda flow was intermittent and when it flowed, it quickly clogged.
I found a video from Eastwood advertising a similar nozzle and they recommend a 3.5gpm rate. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ws3OrpR4CvE

Then I added the blasting gun and had it siphon the media into the water stream.  It flowed consistently, but baking soda is not abrasive enough.  No stains came off.




So, today I bought a box of glass media, which I will use dry first since it's easy to recover... we'll see.
I can't wait for the weekend again!
Meanwhile... I am getting drunk on vapor blasting videos and tutorials.
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Re: Sessantacinque GT rehab (V65 GT), frame crabbing, gear box, transmission
« Reply #16 on: September 07, 2020, 10:09:51 PM »
I finally got to try the glass beads (40/70 grit from Harbor Freight), but without the appropriate blasting cabinet I would have to disperse
a bunch of glass dust all over my yard.  So, I wrapped the engine in a tarp, stuck the blasting gun inside and hit the engine blind.
The media worked well, but it was turning a shade of brown... pieces of the tarp.
Here are the usual before and after....


 


...and the crowd goes wild!  :rolleyes:

At this point I had to build a blasting cabinet, but didn't want to invest time in that.  That's a winter project.  I decided to improve on the tarp idea.
I had a roll of 6mil plastic
thin plywood
banjee cords
a piece of plexiglass
a bucket
a section of ventilated shelving
a 2x4 stud
a 12" swivel bearing: https://www.lowes.com/pd/Richelieu-Swivel-Plate-360-Degree-in-Galvanized-Steel/1000818576
2 saw horses
a mini soccer net
the inevitable duct tape...  Nah, Gorilla Tape!

I bought these blasting cabinet glove ports: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07XGFZLP9 and gloves https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B077YP72SP
These rings are overpriced, but work great.  I attached them to a piece of plywood, insulating the front (was not necessary) and taped the back.  Gorilla Tape is my new friend!






The gloves are not really for a cabinet.  Maybe some other dirty/wet job.  They reach past my elbow, the end cuffs are too stiff and my hands sweat too easily.  Oh well.
I attached the gloves to the rings with 7" hose clamps from Home Depot.




I cut two rectangular openings in the plastic.  I stapled the gloves panel below and taped the plexiglass above.



Who needs a cabinet, when you can make a tent?

I rested the engine on the ventilated shelf with the 2x4 under it, on top of the saw horses.  The shelf is too weak to hold a
113lb engine and makes it difficult to move it inside the tent.
I had seen blasting cabinets with an internal turntable, but the lazy susan did not work well because the engine is long (transmission attached)
and the tent is not deep enough.  I had to put the engine on a piece of 3/4" plywood, over the saw horses.

The plastic is under the plywood, shaped into a funnel and into a bucket.
I fed the air and media hoses through the hole for the bucket and had a... blast.
The media doesn't easily flow into the funnel, so I have to unwrap the tent and sweep the media into the bucket.
I covered the plywood with plastic, so it's easier to sweep.

The media still does the job after I recycled it 5 times.  Is there a limit?

Oh yeah, the bunjees and the soccer net?  The bunjees hold the tent closed and I used the frame of the soccer net to prop the tent over the engine.
One more day and I should be done with the engine.

What to do about the final drive box?!?  I can't blast that.  It will never spin again!  :undecided:
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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I finally got the engine all clean and polished.  This is the end result of a whole summer spent stripping and blasting.


 



I started the assembly process a few weeks ago.  Reattached the gear box, rear drive and swing arm, rear tire, carburetors and air box.
The gear box shifts ok, so at least what started this project seems to be fixed.
I also attached the lower frame rails, but took them off to prevent scratching.  I still have some thing to check before full reassembly.


'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

Offline huub

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nice results!
anybody who ever tried to get a guzzi engine back to bare metal will appreciate the amount of work...
I am lucky i have a specialist who did my le mans  engine,
blasting the engine and box it is the only part of the Restoration i did outsource.

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Thanks huub.  Having approached it from the cheap, I ended up getting the right tools for the job.  That's when I made real progress... not that I would want to do this again.
I did some more cleaning after those pictures and sprayed it with ACF50.  I hope that's enough to keep the metal looking nice.
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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I decided that before I reassemble the bike, I would check the valve lash and the points.
I removed the valve covers and the right one was covered in soot.  The left one is as clean as new.  Below is after a bit of carb cleaner.

    


I did a leak down test, with mixed results.
The left side held pressure withing 2-3 psi, all the way to 90 psi.
However, at this pressure I feel air leaking out of the pushrods of the other cylinder, from the rockers area  :huh:  Is that normal?
This happens for both cylinders.  Perhaps it's through the pushrod cam?

The right side is a not as good.  It holds within 2-3 psi up to 40psi.  Then it falls about 12 psi behind.
So, it looks like a 10 to 13% leak.  Not horrible, but due for a lap.
I can hear air coming out of both the intake and the exhaust.  The oil fill hole is quiet.

I sprayed a bunch of carb cleaner in both intake and exhaust, hoping that carbon deposits will melt away and make a better seal.
I will check pressure again tomorrow.  I am going to postpone opening the head until I can check for compression.  I'll give it the Seafoam treatment.
Time to work on the points.
« Last Edit: May 15, 2021, 11:18:48 PM by Pescatore »
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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While checking the points gap I noticed that the one for the left cylinder (right one in picture) does not make good contact.  The spring is very weak and
it makes a longer loop than the spring for the right cylinder.



  I posted a question about this, but I got a number of recommendations to switch to a Dyna S.
To get the bike going for now, I decided to replace the points.
I bought this kit from MG Cycle: https://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=37_157&products_id=899
Plus the advance springs, just in case I feel patient enough to remove the points plate: https://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=37_157&products_id=2477

When I removed the old points I figured out why the spring is weak.  The white isolating spacer melted onto the spring.  The ignition coil must have shorted out and overheated the contact, which caused the spring to loose its... memory.  In fact, the left cylinder ignition coil is different, probably replaced after a failure.




Replacing the points was easy.  Adjusting the gap took a long time.  What a PITA!  At least the workshop manual explains how to do this.
The weird thing about the new springs is that they are a bit long, so they both make a wide loop now.  I guess that's they way they make them now.
I also had to enlarge the hole for the screw that holds the contact, since it didn't quite line up with the hole.





'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
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Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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I decided to look inside the cylinder and the valves with a camera.  The pistons seem to be in good shape, besides dirty.  There seems to be
a fuel burning issue on the right cylinder because it is covered with carbon.  I expected the left one to be more dirty.
Both heads definitely need to come off for a cleaning and a valve job.

Right piston                               Intake                                         Exhaust
     

Left piston                                 Intake                                         Exhaust
      

'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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After hanging from rafters of my garage for over a year, the frame is back together and the bike is standing on its own again.


Installing the center kick stand springs was a chore and a half.  They didn't reach and I couldn't remember how I took them off.
After a bit of googling, I used my bike jack to stretch them and stuffed them with dimes.  Hooked the springs in and yanked out the coins with pliers.
   


Installed carbs, trimmed new fuel lines https://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=4391
New clutch cable https://www.stein-dinse.biz/product_info.php?products_id=857
New spark wires.  I bought this kit https://www.harpermoto.com/spark-plug-wire-set-061080.html, which comes with a strange
combination of wires.  One wire is very short and has coil connectors crimped on both sides.  I wonder what it's for.
New NGK BP8ES plugs as well.

There are some cables and a hose that are routed between the cylinders, where it's hot.  These are the generator and points wires, the clutch cable and
the basement vent hose.  I fed them through this fiberglass heat shield sleeve:
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07ZF8957W/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o06_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07RLS2G77/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o04_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
Hopefully they survive longer than the originals.

I need to figure out the infamous gear box vent.  On the internet I found a few creative ways to fix this.
For now I took apart the vent to see how I can attach a hose to it.  The air box leaves me less than an inch of clearance above the vent to fit a hose.

I am thinking of JB welding a piece of 1/4" copper tubing, inside the vent, bent away from the air box.  We'll see how it fits.
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

Online Antietam Classic Cycle

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Installed carbs, trimmed new fuel lines https://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=4391
New clutch cable https://www.stein-dinse.biz/product_info.php?products_id=857
New spark wires.  I bought this kit https://www.harpermoto.com/spark-plug-wire-set-061080.html, which comes with a strange
combination of wires.  One wire is very short and has coil connectors crimped on both sides.  I wonder what it's for.


I need to figure out the infamous gear box vent.  On the internet I found a few creative ways to fix this.
For now I took apart the vent to see how I can attach a hose to it.  The air box leaves me less than an inch of clearance above the vent to fit a hose.

I am thinking of JB welding a piece of 1/4" copper tubing, inside the vent, bent away from the air box.  We'll see how it fits.

Those fuel hose assemblies have been known to fail at the crossover - the hose deteriorates and shrinks with age, loosens up and leaks. Fire is a distinct possibility, just ask Chuck in Indiana. I use the metal crossover piece, just different hose and clamps that can be tightened. Or better yet, use dual-inlet banjos instead: https://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=30&products_id=2099

The plug wires are for a Loopframe, just as the description states: "Fits Ambassador, Eldorado, V700, V7 Special and 850 GT".

I use the fitting from a big-block 5 spd. transmission for the vent on small-blocks: https://www.mgcycle.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=55&products_id=4348 Yes, it's tight around the airbox.
Charlie
http://www.AntietamClassicCycle.com
'69 V700
'69 Ambassador
'71 Ambassador
'73 Eldorado
'74 850-T
'76 Convert
'77 Morini 3 1/2 Strada
'81 Ducati 500SL Pantah
'82 V50 III

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Thanks for the advice, Charlie.
I figured since it's called "best quality rubber hose" it wouldn't have that problem.
Did you cut off the crimps at the cross and replaced them with hose clamps?  I suppose I can reuse the hose and the clamps make up for the shrinkage?

The bike had that straight fitting installed, but the hose kinked from being pushed down by the air box.
Over time the kink filled with oil crud and had practically closed.  So, I thought I would do something with the lower profile vent.
If I attach a hose to the original vent, I need a 1/2" hose.  That doesn't fit around the air box.  I JB Weld a piece of copper tubing inside the vent,
bent at an angle, away from the air box.  I can't bend the tubing sharp enough, so still not enough clearance.



I gave up and went back to the straight fitting.

I found various adapters from M10-1.5 to other threads, but it's a kludge.
Someone with a lathe should reproduce the straight fitting with a shorter barb for 1/4" hose.  I would use it on the final drive too.
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

Online Antietam Classic Cycle

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Thanks for the advice, Charlie.
I figured since it's called "best quality rubber hose" it wouldn't have that problem.
Did you cut off the crimps at the cross and replaced them with hose clamps?  I suppose I can reuse the hose and the clamps make up for the shrinkage?

I cut the crimps and throw away everything but the cross. I prefer transparent hose and use spring clamps to secure it. But, replacing the crimps with actual clamps (something like this: https://www.mcmaster.com/53175K86/ ) will work.

On my recently acquired V50 III, I'll be using a M10 brake fitting w/hose that I already have secured by an M10-1.5 banjo bolt purchased on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Russell-640680-10mm-Banjo-Bolt/dp/B003CGSS76 I may need to shorten the bolt so that spring preload is same as with the original fitting.
Charlie
http://www.AntietamClassicCycle.com
'69 V700
'69 Ambassador
'71 Ambassador
'73 Eldorado
'74 850-T
'76 Convert
'77 Morini 3 1/2 Strada
'81 Ducati 500SL Pantah
'82 V50 III

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Thanks for the tip.  I ordered those clamps.  They look similar to the original ones.

I had not thought of a brake fitting.  Brilliant idea.
I have seen those bolts, but it seemed like the hole is wider than the spring.
Maybe it's a generic picture?
'91 Sessantacinque GT
'80 CM400T
MGNOC Member
Ascolta sempre e solo musica vera
E cerca sempre se puoi di capire

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