Author Topic: 1948 Airone - restoration  (Read 7216 times)

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #30 on: December 06, 2020, 05:51:10 PM »
Hi Shawn, the frame holes are not too bad but the center stand holes are very oval



and the side stand bolt shafts are very worn.

I got the rear fender, swing arm and spring box off and cleaned today, the spring box was full of dirty grease but no rust,









Swing arm axle was coated in grease and in nice shape after cleaning it up



The chain has been sawing away at the swing arm pivot tube for a couple decades,



same marks on the underside



Should I weld up these scores on the swing arm tube?


48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #31 on: December 06, 2020, 10:02:49 PM »
I didn't - but wasn't trying for a perfect resto.  How would the bronze swingarm bushings handle the heat?

My solution to the stand was to drill the holes oversize and weld up the rest.








1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #32 on: December 06, 2020, 10:43:29 PM »
How would the bronze swingarm bushings handle the heat?

good question, hadn't thought of that. I would have to heat / pull the bushes out, weld, grind then reinstall the bushes, maybe not worth the effort, going to think about it for a while. I was thinking of welding some pipe sections, 10mm ID into oversize center-stand holes, after running a through bolt through the frame / stand for alignment, weld the tube sections, remove the stand, fill the weld then grind flat. Then repeat for the frame, it sounds simple enough, how it works in reality? Ö we shall see.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #33 on: December 07, 2020, 08:08:59 PM »
Last of the major component strip downs completed today, front fork and steering linkage, front wheel. Surprised to find the front brake shoes in very good shape, clean and not rusted.



Front fork tube is a very robust design.



Fork slider box is dirty but components cleaned up well



One of the front wheel bearings collapsed as I removed it, cage was mangled



Steering stem ball bearings still have grease but its of the consistency of clay



Inside of the headlight bucket is clean



Frame stripped to just two sections, I have a big pile of boxes. all the parts have been cleaned, sorted and tagged. just like a great big model kit now, like the manual says "reassembly is the revers of disassembly", sounds so simple.

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #33 on: December 07, 2020, 08:08:59 PM »

Offline jas67

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #34 on: December 08, 2020, 08:41:46 AM »
If you're looking to weld-fill the chain gouges for cosmetic reasons, could you use JB weld or other epoxy on it instead?
That way you can leave the bronze bushings in, and not worry about damaging them with heat.
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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #35 on: December 08, 2020, 08:50:26 AM »
If you're looking to weld-fill the chain gouges for cosmetic reasons, could you use JB weld or other epoxy on it instead?
That way you can leave the bronze bushings in, and not worry about damaging them with heat.

Thatís a good idea, hadnít thought of epoxy will definitely consider it. I am considering powder coating the frame, swing arm and forks and having the fenders, tool boxes and tank sprayed to match. A metal epoxy should be able to handle the curing temp of powder coating.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Online Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #36 on: December 08, 2020, 09:14:50 AM »
Thatís a good idea, hadnít thought of epoxy will definitely consider it. I am considering powder coating the frame, swing arm and forks and having the fenders, tool boxes and tank sprayed to match. A metal epoxy should be able to handle the curing temp of powder coating.

The guys that do my powder coating say that JB Quik is more heat resistant than regular JB Weld.
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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #37 on: December 08, 2020, 11:12:45 AM »
The guys that do my powder coating say that JB Quik is more heat resistant than regular JB Weld.

Thanks Charlie. I donít think I have used that particular JB product before. Is it a two part liquid gel or is it the putty type that you kneed together? Assuming I keep the chain in tension and not let it ride on the shaft how durable do you think JB is for vibration? My only concern with an epoxy is it breaking off the original surface

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #38 on: December 08, 2020, 12:23:12 PM »
Thanks Charlie. I donít think I have used that particular JB product before. Is it a two part liquid gel or is it the putty type that you kneed together? Assuming I keep the chain in tension and not let it ride on the shaft how durable do you think JB is for vibration? My only concern with an epoxy is it breaking off the original surface

It's actually called "JB KwikWeld". My mind must have went back to my childhood favorite drink Nestle Quik.  :wink: It's the same as regular, just cures quicker. Either will handle the vibration, no problem (if applied correctly).

If it was my project, I'd just machine a slip-on donut out of UHMV plastic for the chain to rub on and forget filling in the grooves.
Charlie
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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #39 on: December 08, 2020, 12:31:02 PM »
If it was my project, I'd just machine a slip-on donut out of UHMV plastic for the chain to rub on and forget filling in the grooves.

Thatís even a better idea! Hide the scores and protect the frame / chain

PS. I had forgotten about Nestle Quick, loved that stuff, I can see the tin in my mind right now.

Thanks

Jim

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #40 on: December 08, 2020, 07:18:29 PM »
I took a closer look at the front fork components, the upside down fork tube slides through an upper bronze bush inside a steel outer shell and a lower set of roller / slider for each leg.





The sliding fork tube has an internal hydraulic damper rod with a minor spring, removable top cap for filling with hydraulic fluid.



The large spring surrounds the moving fork leg and is inside the fixed upper fork tube. Guzzi provided grease nipples to flood the upper bush and the lower roller / slider components. At the very base of the fixed upper leg there is a round seal through which the chrome fork leg slides, this is the grease seal.

The inside of the fixed spring tube was full of grease but it was filthy, probably never been opened up in 70 years.

Seventy years of the fork tube sliding up and down has worn the roller to the extent each roller has extensive flat spots, the roller was not rolling, gummed up with dirty grease.



The upper bush is also worn, not as severe but plenty of slop.



all should be replaced, hopefully these wear parts are available from one of the Italian suppliers.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #41 on: December 08, 2020, 09:26:32 PM »
I am considering powder coating the frame, swing arm and forks and having the fenders, tool boxes and tank sprayed to match. A metal epoxy should be able to handle the curing temp of powder coating.

Some thoughts on powder coating.  I've had 1 frame done well and another done poorly by different powdercoaters.  The 'coater that did a good job cleaned and degreased the frame then put it in the oven to bake the grease out of the head tubes.  He said they bake it repeatedly until there is no more grease. 

The other company must've powdered that frame a dozen times - it was so thick you can't read the frame numbers! 

Powder is more difficult to clear from threads and make electrical grounds.

The paint supplier said that paint is more chip resistant than powder, but that powder is more scratch resistant than paint. This surprised me but it matches what I see on the pipes exhaust I've had powder coated.

JBWeld does survive the oven, but it is difficult to feather out to the point where the edge is hidden by the powder (or maybe I was a rookie).

Great project.  Always wondered what was in those upside down forks!
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #42 on: December 08, 2020, 10:03:03 PM »
Some thoughts on powder coating.  I've had 1 frame done well and another done poorly by different powdercoaters.  The 'coater that did a good job cleaned and degreased the frame then put it in the oven to bake the grease out of the head tubes.  He said they bake it repeatedly until there is no more grease. 

The other company must've powdered that frame a dozen times - it was so thick you can't read the frame numbers! 

Powder is more difficult to clear from threads and make electrical grounds.

The paint supplier said that paint is more chip resistant than powder, but that powder is more scratch resistant than paint. This surprised me but it matches what I see on the pipes exhaust I've had powder coated.

JBWeld does survive the oven, but it is difficult to feather out to the point where the edge is hidden by the powder (or maybe I was a rookie).

Great project.  Always wondered what was in those upside down forks!

I am very lucky to have an excellent powder coater, the owner runs a couple race cars and is a real gear head + he does most of the motorcycle work in these parts. Just as you noted Impact Coatings blasts the parts, pre-bakes out all the grease and oils and has a dip tank to etch the steel prior to coating. They are also very careful to not fill in any vin stampings. I pay a little more but I typically get a clear UV coating over the base powder. The shop has also been able to cut polish out small scratches I made while assembly of a part. The shop almost never misses plugging or masking a hole, like I said I have been very lucky so far. There are many competitors around here for much less money but these are shops who specialize in commercial bulk coating like lawn furniture and I have seen some real crap work, you pay for what you get.

Speaking of getting grease out of tight spaces, three dishwasher soap packages, hot water and 90 minutes in the ultrasonic cleaner, I can keep flipping the parts around and eventually it will be oil and grease free. The powder shop will still pre bake the parts but I want to get it as clean as I can.

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #43 on: December 08, 2020, 10:28:59 PM »
Moto Morini ultrasonic cleaner - that's the best!   :thumb:
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #44 on: December 09, 2020, 06:16:02 PM »
Moto Morini ultrasonic cleaner - that's the best!   :thumb:

Its good for basting rims as well!



Some call this patina



The rear wheel was slathered in red paint, under the red the spokes are black and the rims were painted silver over a coat of black. Soaking in the ultrasonic cleaner loosens the spoke nipples but some still needed a pair of vice grips to budge them



A little vapour blasting to reveal the bare metal



The rear wheel has a significant offset



I have built a lot of spoke wheels but never once had one with an offset.  I need to strip the wheel to get the hub out for powder coating. Is there any trick to lacing an offset wheel or will the lengths of each of the four groups of spokes naturally form the offset when I re-lace the wheel?

Last pieces stripped, the rear shocks, the fluid was clean must have had a recent service, the seals are worn



Assembled a big pile of frame parts for powder coating, just need to add the front and back wheel hubs.



« Last Edit: December 09, 2020, 08:42:06 PM by Canuck750 »
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #45 on: December 09, 2020, 08:54:47 PM »
The GTV front had the largest offset I've laced and the spokes on the offset side had to be much tighter (which makes sense geometrically).  I've always laced the wheels, then mount them in the frame and true to the frame.  The advice was to true the wheel with all spokes finger tight, then tension the wheel.  The offset side required more tension or it would be pulled off the frame centerline to the hub centerline.

Hope that makes sense! 
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #46 on: December 09, 2020, 09:36:07 PM »
The GTV front had the largest offset I've laced and the spokes on the offset side had to be much tighter (which makes sense geometrically).  I've always laced the wheels, then mount them in the frame and true to the frame.  The advice was to true the wheel with all spokes finger tight, then tension the wheel.  The offset side required more tension or it would be pulled off the frame centerline to the hub centerline.

Hope that makes sense!

Thanks Shawn,

I do much the same, always finger tight spoke nipples then true the wheel. Having not built an offset wheel I assume I measure the offsets for both the R and L side prior to disassembly and then upon rebuilding set up some form of jig indicator to match the original dimension or will just assembling the spokes in the original positions naturally result in the offset?
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #47 on: December 09, 2020, 10:30:49 PM »
I think I answered my own questions re offset or I should say Richard Rosenthal did in his article in the November issue of ďThe Classic Motorcycle ď I just picked up this months issue and as I read through it I come to Richardís article with diagrams explaining why the offset is required. I get your explanation now with the rim center being aligned with the frame center and using the forks as the build jig. I will measure the offsets and I should be able to reassemble the wheel correctly.
Thanks for your explanation.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #48 on: December 09, 2020, 10:52:45 PM »




 :grin:
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #49 on: December 09, 2020, 11:52:32 PM »
Brilliant!
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Glawster

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #50 on: December 10, 2020, 03:34:22 AM »
I'm following this thread with interest as I'm refurbing a 1960 Falcone Turismo and you are always a few steps ahead of me.  The parts all look pretty much the same!  I'm currently struggling to get the swing arm pin out - have put it on it's side and keep adding penetrating fluid.  I don't see any steps on your pin which should prevent removal.  Also did you take out the light switch from the headlight shell?  That's got me puzzled - I don't see any way to release it.
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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #51 on: December 10, 2020, 10:06:55 AM »
I'm following this thread with interest as I'm refurbing a 1960 Falcone Turismo and you are always a few steps ahead of me.  The parts all look pretty much the same!  I'm currently struggling to get the swing arm pin out - have put it on it's side and keep adding penetrating fluid.  I don't see any steps on your pin which should prevent removal.  Also did you take out the light switch from the headlight shell?  That's got me puzzled - I don't see any way to release it.

I was lucky with the swing arm pin, just some penetrating fluid applied a couple days before I removed d it.  A wrench on the square end of the shaft turned it out of the frame. I have not taken a close look at the headlight bucket yet, I did try to get the switch out while the headlight was on the bike but quickly gave up. Stripping the headlight shell and horn are on my to do list
Keep me posted on your progress.
Cheers
Jim
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #52 on: December 10, 2020, 07:55:30 PM »
Tackled the center stand, both the oblong holes in the frame and the center stand, frame, typical each side, not sure what the slots are in the frame holes but they appear to be stock, my guess is the stand bolts should have a tang on the head that fits into the frame slot and keeps the bolts from rotating??



Out came the MIG,



weld both sides of the frame flange and grind flat



level and clamp the frame section on the mill, find the center and mill a new 10.5mm hole, the washer was just loose as a placement guide



Original bolt for fit



For the center stand the holes were so large I bored them out to 19mm and welded in new steel bushings then ground the stubs flat and bored the centers to 10.5mm



back together, a snug fit, should be solid now



I measured and recorded the wheel rim to spoke flange offsets and measured the length of each spoke, go figure there are four different lengths of spoke on each wheel



The Airone came with a spare rear brake hub and brake back plate that is larger than the one that was on the bike and the spare brake hub is ribbed whereas the rear brake hub on the bike is not ribbed,  Another feature of the smaller diameter rear hub on the bike is there are two studs riveted to the back plate that the shoes pivot on, one pivot for each shoe and a short steel strap joins the stubs after the shoes are in place and is secured with a M6 nut. The larger drum / plate has one fixed stud with the typical round pin that a pair of shoes share.







anyone which of the two types of brake hub is correct for this 1949 Astorino?
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #53 on: December 10, 2020, 11:49:02 PM »
Check the 1947 parts book from rpw.it.  It shows the pressed steel swingarm with the smaller brakes (tavola 15 & 16)
https://www.rpw.it/Files/Guzzi_Airone%201947%20-%20(testa%20scoperta)%20Catalogo%20ricambi.pdf

My friend's 1951 Airone has the steel tube swingarm with the larger brakes. 

The parts books show that after WWII Guzzi put hydraulic forks and rear dampers into production before the larger brakes.  On the GTV/Astore the existing tiny front brake from the girder fork had a strap welded to it for use with the new teles.   It looks like they did the same with the Airone.

Nice work with the stand!

BTW measure the length of the swingarm rebound stops (#51-54 in Tavola 10) before you lose it.  Mine could use a little more rebound travel.

 
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #54 on: December 11, 2020, 11:10:16 AM »
Thanks Shawn, great information!
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #55 on: December 11, 2020, 09:25:24 PM »
I was able to remove all the spokes from the front and rear wheel without breaking any, plenty of penetrating fluid being sprayed on the wheels for a couple weeks worked.

My spoke map



The rear wheel spokes are thinner than the front and the rear wheel nipples have a concave washer between the nipple and rim, that's a new one for me.



I typically string spoke nipples through thin galvanized wire to clean them and then send them off for Cad plating. The spokes cleaned up decently on a wire wheel. I think all the layers of paint preserved the spokes and nipples.



I asked Valenti's USA rep Mike Peavy to enquire if new spoke kits are available, if not I will reuse these originals.

Stripped the seat cover off, making a pile of parts for black powder coating including the head light shell, rear suspension spring box, center stand.



The seat cover needs some TLC, the metal folding straps need plating and the split rivets replaced, the fabric just needs some good scrubbing.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Glawster

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #56 on: December 12, 2020, 06:01:12 AM »
You're moving on very fast Jim.  Regarding the seat cover I see Brezzi Samuele has them for Ä45.  I got a dual seat cover from Brezzi for my Parilla and was very pleased with the quality, so I'll be going for one of those.
I did finally manage to remove the swing arm pin.
However, I now have a problem to strip the forks.  Can you advise what holds the lower fork leg to the damper mech?  I've unscrewed the castellated ring and taken out the brass guides, but can't separate the lower leg.  There must be something I've missed, but I can't see it.
Cheers,
Derek


20201212_112622 by Derek Wardell, on Flickr
1955 Falcone Sport
1973 V7 Sport
2019 V85TT
1955 Moto Parilla Turismo Special

Online Canuck750

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #57 on: December 12, 2020, 11:01:42 AM »
The hard chrome lower fork leg is held by the upper shaft that has the castle nut integral on top. That castle capped shaft is sitting on top of the upper bush and the bush is bolted to the fixed upper fork. Could be the damper rod with the threaded end that sticks out the top of the chrome fork cap is sticking on the upper oil seal. I clamped the bottom of the lower chrome fork leg and grabbing the upper painted fork assembly I pulled hard on the upper section to free the leg.
I found that after the chrome leg was out getting the upper bronze bush out through the top of the painted upper fork required a long steel rod pushed in from the bottom of the painted fork and tapping on the bush to get it out the top of the fork body.

Hope this helps

Let me know

Jim
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #58 on: December 12, 2020, 05:18:44 PM »
I dissembled the headlight shell, to remove the switch plate unscrew the four small screws that retain the wire eyelet terminals



The two center eyelet screws retain a removable plate, move the plastic / brass piece to one side, there is a nut hidden below that holds the outer key flange to the switch plate



I removed the plastic indicator light lenses by pulling the black plastic retainers off from the inside of the headlight bucket but the internal plastic clips just broke up, I will probably just glue the two plastic indicator lenses back in place.

The shell has a lot of deep 'patina' marks in it, going to sand it out as much as I can, maybe some filler will be required.



Parts stripped for satin black powder coating


48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Online Canuck750

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Re: 1949 Airone - restoration
« Reply #59 on: December 13, 2020, 05:24:50 PM »
I am going to name the Airone rebuild my official COVID bike, seems fitting, I put off touching it for years waiting for the right moment, it took a lock down to get me to decide what to do with it and get onto the restoration.

This afternoon spent quality lock down time in my shop sanding out the rust pits on the rear frame rails. The horizontal surfaces of the heavy steel rails have deep rust pits, too deep to just bead blast and send to powder coat, I could sand blast and fill the pitting and then sand it smooth but given how thick the steel is in these components I decided to sand the rusted surface smooth.



a couple hours with a random orbital air sander with a foam pad starting with 120 then 240 and finally 320 grit paper the surfaces came out smooth



One pair ready for powder coating



gave the headlight shell the same sanding process, the pitting was deeper and some minor remnants remain, I will ask my powder coater if the finish will fill and flow or if I need to fill and sand this piece

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

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Shipping in USA Only. Awesome quality. Back by popular demand. All proceeds go back into the forum.
http://www.wildguzzi.com/Products/products.htm
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