Author Topic: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado  (Read 18982 times)

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #60 on: November 21, 2018, 06:25:05 PM »
Beautiful work (even with the missed shift dog) and an inspiration.

BTW - a output shaft shim was lost when putting the GTV engine together and I compensated by adding a shim to the outside. Didn't find the problem 'til months later when cleaning under the stove!  :thewife:  The real fix is to tear it out of the frame and split the cases - but I've just not gotten there yet...

Thanks Shaun,

I found Dellorto carb had the V11 needles in stock that I need for these carbs, one more hard to fid part sourced.

The swing arm has a large jamb nut, it was missing on the bike when I got it and Detlef Burian sent me one that is a wee bit too small. The threads are very fine for such a big thread, I am guessing 1.5 pitch? and maybe a 27mm size?? I have been searching on line for someone who caries such a big metric jamb nut, does anyone know a source for such odd metric stuff? I don't have McMaster Carr in Canada and they will not ship outside of the USA??

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #61 on: November 21, 2018, 07:44:18 PM »
The swing arm has a large jamb nut, it was missing on the bike when I got it and Detlef Burian sent me one that is a wee bit too small. The threads are very fine for such a big thread, I am guessing 1.5 pitch? and maybe a 27mm size?? I have been searching on line for someone who caries such a big metric jamb nut, does anyone know a source for such odd metric stuff? I don't have McMaster Carr in Canada and they will not ship outside of the USA??

Measure to determine exactly what diameter and thread pitch you need and I'll see what I can find. 
Charlie

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #62 on: November 21, 2018, 07:55:18 PM »
Measure to determine exactly what diameter and thread pitch you need and I'll see what I can find.

Thanks !

I will check when I get back home on the 29th.

Cheers

Jim

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #63 on: December 01, 2018, 06:11:09 PM »
Got some time in on the Benelli today, started with fitting the new chain, I read an article in Classic Bike where Rick Parkington talks about using a chain puller to bring the two ends of the chain together. I found several on Ebay and got this one from China with free shipping for $15.00, great little tool

https://www.ebay.com/itm/25-35-41-40-50-60-415H-428H-520-530-Roller-Chain-Connecting-Puller-Holder/172623069155?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649



and I fitted the chain guard, it has few dents and its split at he back but until I can find a better one this will do



I started to install the wiring, the repro wire harness comes with clear soft plastic covers that are too fat for the CEV fuse box and terminal box, cut off the connections and installed salvaged plastic covers and new fittings



I got the alternator, regulator, rectifier and ignition switch wires done and the starter and battery positive wires on.

« Last Edit: January 01, 2020, 10:10:54 PM by canuck750 »

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #63 on: December 01, 2018, 06:11:09 PM »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #64 on: December 02, 2018, 07:02:39 PM »
I 'borrowed' the Ceriani shocks off my Laverda SF1 while I wait on the Benelli's pair getting the hard chrome plating of the worn shafts. I like the quality of the Ceriani shocks and the hand adjuster lever cast into the lower spring retainer.



Marzocchi made the forks so I added some repro decals, I don't think Benelli ever placed the decals like Moto-Morini and Ducati did but I like the look of the decal and I think it adds a little touch to the build



Points plate, points, condensers and new wire sub harness up to the fuse box

Advance mechanism cleaned and lubricated



I got a high tension wire set from Guzzino, it comes with the two ends formed onto one wire, fit the length, cut the wire and fit the open end into the coils



Detlef's wire harness kit comes with the rubber cap boots already fitted over the ends for the coils

All the ends terminating at the fuse box where cut off and re-fitted with the hard plastic ends of the original harness anew ends crimped on.

The tank trim is stainless steel but this bike suffered a lot of abuse, I cleaned and polished it up as best I could, it looks ok from a few feet back but its far from perfect.



« Last Edit: January 01, 2020, 10:15:06 PM by canuck750 »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #65 on: December 05, 2018, 10:12:51 AM »
The three dash idiot light lens are all in very poor condition, Detlef sent me three new style LED lights to replace the original bulb and bezel units but I prefer the bezel of the original.

The LED is a one piece bezel and bulb, the original bezel that holds a coloured plastic disc inside



I put the new unit in my lathe and turned off the bezel and threads until the LED body slid snug into the old bezel



I had two Benelli dash boards and salvaged three bezels from the lot, the lights are similar but not identical, one having a larger aperature

A little epoxy to make sure the sure in LED stays in place


Three refreshed idiot lights installed and wired in to the fuse box, the lights should be visible in the sun light, a common knock on Italian bikes of the period that as the poor dash lights and equally poor gauge accuracy.



Repainted the headlight bucket and fitted a spare rubber lamp gasket and chrome trim ring, same CEV unit used on the Moto Guzzi V7 Sport



I have to get some stainless solid bar and turn up a pair of front signal light stems with a threaded end to screw into the headlight bucket, the lamp end will have a 1/2 ring cut out to take the 6mm pinch bolt passing through the signal light body. seems these CEV / Benelli front signal light stems are unobtanium.





Neutral light wire running down the centre of the frame rail to the neutral switch in the back of the crankcase

Getting close now, need to have it ready for the International Motorcycle Show in town for January 11th.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2020, 10:19:07 PM by canuck750 »

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #66 on: December 05, 2018, 12:01:03 PM »
 :thumb: :thumb:
Charlie

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #67 on: December 05, 2018, 08:06:07 PM »
The wire harness kits Detlef supplied are great but there were a few components missing: the starter button harness, light switch harness and the signal light harness.

The starter button is just two lengths of brown wire, one end to the fuse box with the ignition 'on' side of the box and the other end to the starter relay.





added some pvc sheathing (I get it from British Wiring in the USA along with multi-colour wire and crimp connectors)

https://www.britishwiring.com/



A zip tie and it should start when the button is pressed

Benelli used a common CEV signal light switch on the left handlebar, I found a new one on Ebay



Again this CEV switch has machine screw wire fastening, nice touch, and its labeled Left (S) and right (D) Big chunky switch, should be easy to use

Now the CEV light switch is another beast altogether, I have ruined these in the past trying to solder wires to the brass lugs. I use electrical conductive epoxy, its very pricey but you only need a couple dabs



The original switch on the left had the power wire from the flasher re-soldered and the plastic melted and warped the connection, ruined!

Just a couple more electrical jobs to make up the signal light connections and to connect the brake light switches, hopefully all of the electrical will work.

I also found some original spec spark plugs on Ebay

Benelli Bauer found me a pair of front signal light stems and the rear brake pull rod, the last two hard to find parts I need!
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 01:41:50 PM by canuck750 »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #68 on: December 06, 2018, 07:40:30 PM »
I finished with the wiring today with the exception of hooking up the front signal lights once the stems come in from Germany.


Spaghetti junction like the Moto Morini the folks in Pessaro chose to use individual wire harness components for each system, it seems busy but the more I work with this type of electrical the more I like it, easy to install, easy to trace faults, no big multi wire harness to contend with. The Benelli Tornado use the same type of CEV fuse box as the Moto Guzzi V7 Sport and the Moto Morini 350 / 500 twins.



For the rear signal lights I used a modern single wire quick connector



Foe the signal flasher I used a Moto Guzzi rubber flasher holder and just slipped it around the bracket that carries the regulator, looks like it could have been stock

The conductive electrical epoxy set up over night so I could finish installing the light switch and hook up the final headlamp connections



A package came from EuroCarb with new V11 needles of the VHB 29 carbs,  the Benelli carbs do not have accelerator pumps like those used by Moto Guzzi on the V7 Sport, Eldorado etc, I had Guzzi type needles in, V9 I think, the V11 are much shorter, new jets and gaskets were included to freshen up the carbs



Silent block fitted to the front of the gas tank





I saved the original foam tank pad, need to glue it to the underside of the gas tank



And the tank strap now in place



Installed the used vent hose rubber clip



I need to remove this little tab from the old brake lever perch and braze it onto the new perch, this tab holds the front brake light switch



Should have noticed this before I installed the brake lever

This is how the perch / brake switch looked when I got the bike, there is a cylindrical stud that fastens into the round cable recess under the brake lever and makes contact with the brake pressure witch, pull the brake lever and the switch plunger opens and the brake light comes on. I was wondering what that strange stub in my parts box was for!



« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 01:49:50 PM by canuck750 »

Online Huzo

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #69 on: December 06, 2018, 08:56:44 PM »
I should be inspired by this sort of thing, but it just makes me realise I'm not made of the right stuff to do a proper restoration.
You blokes remind me of the fellas that build their own gliders from wood. They're the sort of blokes that could build a piano if they wanted to.
I'm in awe...

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #70 on: December 06, 2018, 09:35:25 PM »

This is how the perch / brake switch looked when I got the bike, there is a cylindrical stud that fastens into the round cable recess under the brake lever and makes contact with the brake pressure witch, pull the brake lever and the switch plunger opens and the brake light comes on. I was wondering what that strange stub in my parts box was for!



This is also the same as the early Morini 3 1/2 Sport set-up. If you need a switch, Magura makes one that works perfectly, I bought it on Amazon for $12.
Charlie

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #71 on: December 07, 2018, 09:30:40 AM »
This is also the same as the early Morini 3 1/2 Sport set-up. If you need a switch, Magura makes one that works perfectly, I bought it on Amazon for $12.

Thanks Charlie,
good to know,
I need to take a look at my Morini 3 1/2 to see if it has this switch, a different take on a brake light switch compared to the Guzzi in-line cable device.

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #72 on: December 07, 2018, 09:59:19 AM »
I should be inspired by this sort of thing, but it just makes me realise I'm not made of the right stuff to do a proper restoration.
You blokes remind me of the fellas that build their own gliders from wood. They're the sort of blokes that could build a piano if they wanted to.
I'm in awe...

Its not rocket science trust me! If you are interested in getting into restorations get a hold of a small displacement Honda such as a S90 or Step-through from the 60's, simple bikes that are not too big of a project to get frustrated with and parts supply is excellent plus you get something iconic to enjoy once you are finished.my first restoration was a 1965 Honda S65, I broke more than I fixed, had to rebuild the motor three times until I figured it out, spent weeks trying to lace the wheels etc.... I really learned a lot and got hooked on turning crud back to life.

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #73 on: December 07, 2018, 11:39:54 AM »
The upholstery repair shop just delivered the restored Benelli seat, I think they did a great job.



the torn front area was reinforced from behind with a very durable mesh fabric, all the holes patched from behind, vinyl stained black.



The shop did their best to replicate the chrome plastic band, not the shine of plastic chrome but a heck of an improvement on the raw green plastic.



If anyone knows where to find the CEV tail light red reflector inserts please let me know.




« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 01:51:49 PM by canuck750 »

Offline mcdammitt

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #74 on: December 10, 2018, 04:36:47 PM »
Very nice restoration, wow.
'03 EV w/Champion sidecar
'73 Eldo
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canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #75 on: December 13, 2018, 07:36:44 PM »
Benelli Bauer came through with a swing arm jamb nut



And he also sent me a new rear brake pull rod, a real nice used chain guard and this pair of NOS front signal light stems, they still had the part label on them



Glad I didn't have to make up a facsimile of these



and the restored cast aluminum signal light body clamps over the stem



Now I can finish off the wiring

« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 01:54:22 PM by canuck750 »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #76 on: December 14, 2018, 02:51:00 PM »
I am looking for a pair of red rear side reflectors for my 650 Benelli, they fit into a recess in the rear tail light bracket.

44mm x 25mm (1 3/4" x 1"), stick on would work or the original CEV bolt on.

Also looking for a pair of the CEV bolt on front amber side reflectors, these were fitted to some Benelli 650S Tornado depending upon market.

They are the same as these ones on my 1972 Benelli 180 Enduro

Any help finding these is greatly appreciated!

Thanks

Jim
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 01:54:44 PM by canuck750 »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #77 on: December 15, 2018, 05:27:34 PM »
Finishing the signal lights, 1st to drill out a broken off lens screw, 4mm x .75 tapped

Terminate the wires, add a ground wire to each lamp body and the lighting is done.

Heated up the broken brake lever perch and melted the silver solder to free the switch tab and brazed the old tab onto the new perch

Brake light switch in place

Swapped the new chain guard over



And fitted a pair of new petcocks with the clear sediment bowl, similar to the original type used by Benelli but not an exact match, the male hoase nipple is a lot smaller O.D. than the fitting on the carb, need to figure out what to do about that to make one size of hose fit a small and large nipple at the same time ???

I tried to fit the brake pull rod that came in the mail

But the brake lever arm I got a couple months ago does not fit the splines of the rear brake cam shaft that is 13mm

The arm I have is only 10mm, must have been for a smaller Benelli

Looks like the brake arm on my 72 Moto Guzzi has a 13mm spline and the arm looks like it will work, I know I have one in my Guzzi stash
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 01:56:12 PM by canuck750 »

Offline Rick4003

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #78 on: December 16, 2018, 12:24:03 AM »
Have been out of the loop for a while, my wife gave birth to our second child this thursday, so lots of things going on.

Just wanted to say that the bike looks amazing. And it is fantastic to think of how it looked when you got it and how it looks now! That is some transformation for sure!

-Ulrik
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canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #79 on: December 16, 2018, 10:06:04 AM »
Have been out of the loop for a while, my wife gave birth to our second child this thursday, so lots of things going on.

-Ulrik

Congratulations on the birth of your second child! Life just got twice as busy and twice the fun for you!

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #80 on: December 16, 2018, 03:41:47 PM »
Moto Guzzi parts to the rescue! The Guzzi Eldorado rear brake arm fits onto the Benelli brake plate shaft and the shape of the Guzzi part works with the Benelli geometry.

Benelli fitted this little steel stud with rubber cushion as a brake pedal stop, nice detail.

And under the seat attached to the shock upper mount bolt is this simple helmet hanger that secures the helmet once the seat latch is locked



The To Do List is getting pretty short;

clutch lever (Wolfgang Haerter is supplying one),
install clutch cable,
install headlight,
side reflectors (still looking),
install side stand (coming form Italy - I hope..),
weld a tab onto the centre stand,
get a key cut for seat latch,
replace points and condensers,
adjust valves and install rocker cover O rings,
check the electrical,
fill the engine with oil,
add gas,
cross fingers,
press start.


« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 01:58:28 PM by canuck750 »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #81 on: December 18, 2018, 06:07:58 PM »
I was not able to find an original rubber battery tray so I opted for a battery mat from MG Cycle, just trim to fit with scissors and peel off the paper over the self adhesive backing,



MG Cycle sent a new headlight

And the side stand came in from Italy, the bracket was with the bike but the pin that the stand slides over was broken off.

I made a new pin out of steel stock in the lathe and cut a groove for a circlip like the original had





Now to just weld the pin to the bracket and give it a shot of black paint + find a side stand spring that will work

Couple more jobs off the list.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 02:00:51 PM by canuck750 »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #82 on: December 23, 2018, 02:48:02 PM »
A new clutch lever came in the mail Friday from Wolfgang Haerter in Nakusp B.C.

The new clutch cable I got from Germany does not have the correct end for the lever, this will have to do for now until I find another cable



The cable winds its way around the left side of the motor passing through two cable guides

Then through the top of the crankcase passing through a lug before ending at the clutch arm and a pinch fitting holds it in place. finished with a little rubber end cap silicone in place


I scanned the break in instruction out of the owners manual and had a repro decal made for the tank, its the same size as the decal that was on the tank, handy



Glare from the lights overhead and the camera makes the decal hard to read in the picture, it actually looks fine on the tank

Just waiting on the tiny Made In Italy decal to come in the mail, the tri-colour decal site behind the break in decal and finishes off the job.


Setting the points, timing etc is next.

« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 02:02:43 PM by canuck750 »

Offline Petrus Rocks

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #83 on: December 24, 2018, 02:24:02 PM »
really enjoyed your restoration!  I'm in the process of rebuilding a Norton 850 and see many similarities in the builds.  However mine was in nicer shape with little rust.  You are going the extra mile with the myriad of details!  I hope you post a video  when running.

Offline F-22

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #84 on: December 28, 2018, 02:58:23 AM »
Possibly, the reflectors for your tail light are the same as fitted to later plastic chromed US-export CEV turn signals (I think mostly on Moto Guzzi, but probably also used by others). I think they screw on just like that.
« Last Edit: December 28, 2018, 02:59:31 AM by F-22 »

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #85 on: December 28, 2018, 10:45:39 AM »
Possibly, the reflectors for your tail light are the same as fitted to later plastic chromed US-export CEV turn signals (I think mostly on Moto Guzzi, but probably also used by others). I think they screw on just like that.

I will take a look, I think I have one of those CEV signal lights in a box somewhere

Thanks

Jim

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #86 on: December 28, 2018, 06:17:58 PM »
I will take a look, I think I have one of those CEV signal lights in a box somewhere

Thanks

Jim

Those are considerably larger than what you need. I thought I'd found the answer: '73 & '74 H-D/Aermacchi Sprint has reflectors on either side of the headlight - although they seem to be about the right size, they're the wrong color (amber).
Charlie

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #87 on: December 28, 2018, 08:38:06 PM »
Those are considerably larger than what you need. I thought I'd found the answer: '73 & '74 H-D/Aermacchi Sprint has reflectors on either side of the headlight - although they seem to be about the right size, they're the wrong color (amber).

I often check Ebay for Aermacchi signal lights, for a couple years Aermacchi used the same cast aluminum CEV signal lights as the Benelli 650 Tornado. I have been looking at all kinds of brands including small displacement Moto Morini, Guzzi, other Benelli bikes, etc.... still can't find anything close, I sent measurements and pictures of the CEV tail light bracket depressions for the red reflectors to the Laverda parts guru Wolfgang Haerter and to Detlef Burian, still no luck.

I think they will turn up, everything else I thought I may never find seems to pop up unexpectantly one day.

canuck750

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #88 on: December 31, 2018, 06:18:07 PM »
a small detail hardly anyone will ever see, the CEV clear plastic fuse box lid is almost always missing or broken. Eurortrash Jambalaya sells complete CEV fuse boxes on Ebay and a clear lid can be taken from a new one but a couple years ago I tried casting my own copy with a latex mold and clear urethane, its very hard to get the air bubbles out of the resin in the mold without a vacuum chamber, the results are just OK and since this part will not be readily visible it will do. I photocopied the CEV coloured card from my V7 Sport fuse box and laminated the colour copy to a thin card board.



A couple retainer clips to hold the colour card like the original system



Air bubble not as noticeable when the colour card is mounted inside the cover

And back in its final position under the seat



I adjusted the valves, fitted the rocker cover O rings and set the points, finished the fuel lines, just need to add oil to the engine and forks.
« Last Edit: January 02, 2020, 02:05:07 PM by canuck750 »

Offline Rick4003

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Re: Building a Benelli 650 Tornado
« Reply #89 on: January 02, 2019, 05:17:55 AM »
Looking great Jim!

Very cool that you cast the fuse box lid yourself! I think a quick and dirty vacuum pot could be made of a strong paint bucket and a ejector style air fitting. It will obviously not be able to pull down to -0.9 bar or something like that. But I think it would be possible to pull the airbubbles out with less. Might be worth a try. A piece of pipe with ends closed could also be used.

I do agree though that the air bubbles are not so visible when the colour card is in. And it is under the seat, so it would probably not be worth fighting with.


So only oil is left?! post up some completed pictures! and then you just have to wait till winters over?
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