Author Topic: A smaller sized touring bike?  (Read 3206 times)

Offline Arctic Fox

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #60 on: July 29, 2021, 03:15:54 PM »

Earlier bikes were smaller?

I have heard story that my grandfather's brother rode from Helsingfors to Ostrobothnia (to our place) with his Jawa 350 (at the end of 1960's).
Some 400 - 500km. The story goes that he felt so bad/sick (as he got here) that the bike stayed here for a while.


Offline willowstreetguzziguy

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #61 on: July 29, 2021, 03:53:19 PM »
Started this thread looking for a touring bike with factory fairing and bags at a wet weight around 500 pounds, capable of hauling rider, passenger and luggage for a multi day tour. (The GL650. Weighed in around 530 lbs.) I thought 30 years of technology could produce such a bike if it was desired but maybe it’s not? I realize just about any bike could have bags thrown over the back and ridden for days on end. I’m thinking of a factory set up touring bike around 500 pounds that can carry 2 people comfortably. Is it possible?

Yes, I realize ANY motorcycle can be used for touring.  But a mid weight “factory bike” with fairing and bags capable of caring 2 people reasonably comfortably ?
?
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Offline sidecarnutz

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #62 on: July 29, 2021, 04:21:18 PM »
I decided to put together a sport touring bike to fit my needs this past Spring. 2021 RE Conti GT. Added a touring saddle side bags and then a factory rack that I put a Givi universal baseplate on. Then a Givi 45 liter trunk. Perfect solo sport tourer for me. The 270 degree crank makes it smooth like a Guzzi. 70 mpg out on the road. (Euro 4 cert) I think the suspension and brakes are great. I've been told the Conti has stiffer springs than the INT. It suits my 250# short bulk well. I got it broken in before I got my new knee installed. Started riding again last week 10 weeks after the knee installation. VERY pleased to be back riding and working my way up to touring on it this Fall!

yeah, I might be addicted to brake fluid. But I can stop any time I want.

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #63 on: July 29, 2021, 05:54:01 PM »
   That new Benelli TRK looks pretty good. Seem to be popular in Europe. Pretty good reviews. I sat on one and liked it. Deal breaker for me was no center stand.

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #63 on: July 29, 2021, 05:54:01 PM »

Offline stubbie

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #64 on: July 29, 2021, 08:53:13 PM »
guzziboy66 been looking at that bike myself. I found one that has been lowered. 21ltr tank, 400km from said tank and 213kg wet, 110hp at 11500rpm.


You could also look at a Benelli 899 Trek.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2021, 09:10:01 PM by stubbie »

Offline krglorioso

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #65 on: July 29, 2021, 10:14:12 PM »
I decided to put together a sport touring bike to fit my needs this past Spring. 2021 RE Conti GT. Added a touring saddle side bags and then a factory rack that I put a Givi universal baseplate on. Then a Givi 45 liter trunk. Perfect solo sport tourer for me. The 270 degree crank makes it smooth like a Guzzi. 70 mpg out on the road. (Euro 4 cert) I think the suspension and brakes are great. I've been told the Conti has stiffer springs than the INT. It suits my 250# short bulk well. I got it broken in before I got my new knee installed. Started riding again last week 10 weeks after the knee installation. VERY pleased to be back riding and working my way up to touring on it this Fall!



Interesting; you find the OEM Enfield 650 suspension great and I find it awful (hard).  The answer lies in the rider's weight, apparently.  You weigh 250# and I'm 133# this morning.
I need to give serious consideration to the Big Mac diet.

Ralph 
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #66 on: July 30, 2021, 05:45:48 AM »
Interesting; you find the OEM Enfield 650 suspension great and I find it awful (hard).  The answer lies in the rider's weight, apparently.  You weigh 250# and I'm 133# this morning.
I need to give serious consideration to the Big Mac diet.

Ralph
I test rode an Enfield Int several months ago and found the suspension as you did ................. very stiff over our not so good roads.  To be fair, I find many bikes to be sprung too stiff for my 160 pounds (dry wt.)  I guess I prefer bikes that many would find too lightly sprung.
Example, I found my 2008 1200 Sport especially compliant, after minimal time spent tweaking the stock suspension.  Conversely, I could never get this compliance out of my 2012 Griso 8vSE.  Main reason the Sport was ridden 4x as many miles as the Griso over same time period.

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Offline Muzz

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #67 on: July 30, 2021, 06:05:28 AM »

For a lightweight, inexpensive Guzzi touring bike, this:





Wondered why it took so long.  I have had mine for close to 18 years now and it does everything I want it to.  Tours just great.
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Offline ScepticalScotty

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #68 on: July 30, 2021, 06:12:48 AM »
My Breva750 is a great smaller touring bike, and this is my second one - which I plan on having for a few years until I buy a V7 850 Stone and rig it out the same way - small screen + HB racks for my HB bags + centrestand, or......maybe the new road going V85 based thing will come along and I will go for that (and ride it until I cark it!). For reference I'm 5 foot 3.

Reading the conversation its apparent theres a huge difference between European/UK touring and touring in the US. The twisty roads start 3 miles from my house and they are excellent. Some motorway is a necessary evil, not the done thing when I tour. From Dunquerque to Mandello I think 5% of the miles were on motorways; a  bit near Valenciennes, a bit between Strassbourg and Friegberg (Autobahn) and an accidental bit in Switzerland that we had no pass/carnet for and got on by mistake!! Luckily not fined!!!!
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #69 on: July 30, 2021, 06:47:48 AM »
Good opinions.  The Versos 650 is a great bike, and I'm pretty sure a Royal Enfield 650 would be near the top of my list of new street bikes if I was buying.

As always it's a personal thang.  What a smaller touring bike really depends on one's point of reference.  Kinda like what is skinny or fat.
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #70 on: July 30, 2021, 07:11:28 AM »
Just don't plan on riding on any freeways... :laugh: :grin: :wink: :thumb: :boozing: :cool: :bow: :smiley:



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Offline ScepticalScotty

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #71 on: July 30, 2021, 10:18:11 AM »
Freeways/motorways(UK)  are probably childs play compared to the Bahn. Lane discipline is the key. Tooling along at an indicated 100mph, Jeff on the Norge and me on the Breva 750, we passed a fair few cars and trucks doing a steady 80 to 90. The MOMENT you pass them and its safe to do so, you have to pull back into the "slow" lane because you can bet there's a Focus RS or a Porsche or Audi or Merc doing between 120 and 170 wanting to come past. And the amazing thing (compared to the UK) is THEY then move to the far right lane if there is nothing in front of them. It all works amazingly well.
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Offline Vagrant

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #72 on: July 30, 2021, 11:41:31 AM »



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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #73 on: July 30, 2021, 01:26:18 PM »
With an aging demographics of motorcycle riders, Is there a market for a smaller sized touring bike with a fairing? Does every touring bike have to be over 1000cc and 600 pounds? Remember back when Honda marketed the 650 cc twin engine Silver Wing? Some riders on here are considering much smaller bikes to tour on in place of a Norge or Big block Guzzi. Many of us are realizing we can get by with a much smaller bike for touring.

They’ve gone smaller with adventure bikes. Is there a market for smaller sized touring bikes with a fairing or is that market segment too small? Or have the adventure bikes taking on that role?
Closest thing would be the 2022 Moto Guzzi V7 with the 850 engine and a frame mounted fairing and matching hard bags. For some reason I can't find a picture of one on the internet.

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #74 on: July 30, 2021, 06:33:24 PM »
Just don't plan on riding on any freeways... :laugh: :grin: :wink: :thumb: :boozing: :cool: :bow: :smiley:





Are you saying the Royal Enfield 650 doesn't have the horsepower to run on the freeway?  I seem to remember you buoying one recently.  Is this from personal experience?  What do you think the max comfortable touring speed would be?

In my imagination, freeway in AZ means WFO!  Am I close?
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Offline stubbie

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #75 on: July 30, 2021, 09:25:16 PM »
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Offline sidecarnutz

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #76 on: July 31, 2021, 03:21:21 PM »
Interesting; you find the OEM Enfield 650 suspension great and I find it awful (hard).  The answer lies in the rider's weight, apparently.  You weigh 250# and I'm 133# this morning.
I need to give serious consideration to the Big Mac diet.

Ralph

LOL! You'll need a 52" chest and thick legs too. I come from a long line of sturdy mine and mill workers! Just ride it two up!
yeah, I might be addicted to brake fluid. But I can stop any time I want.

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #77 on: August 01, 2021, 07:05:50 AM »
I would also like to see a real “TOURING” midsize motorcycle offered by all the major companies. When I say “touring” I’m saying  one that the buyer does not have to start replacing substandard equipment from the get go, to have a good tourer. When one has to do that, they have not purchased a true “touring” motorcycle.
Huzo is proving, as we speak, that any motorcycle can be equipped and used as a touring bike.

Some of the problem is too many variables. I prefer symmetrical hard bags with no exhaust cut out at the sacrifice of sticking out further. The next feller might like bags that are tucked in as far as possible and the third guy may prefer soft panniers. Grips, handlebars, handle bar rise and pull back, pegs, windscreen, seats and on and on are different combos for each person. The best a manufacturer can do is give a blank slate and let you build to suit from there.

As I've aged and "toured" more my wants in a bike have evolved too. Before it was looks and performance now it wind management, a comfy seat and good fuel range. I guess I changed from form over function to function over form.

I really do not what a "smaller" touring bike as dimensionally I have not gotten any smaller.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2021, 07:10:05 AM by Perazzimx14 »
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #78 on: August 01, 2021, 07:16:39 AM »
if you want full wind protection,i think it is difficult to get all you want in a touring bike below a certain size and weight.  the best one i had was a 2004 r1150rt.  the specs put it at 630 lbs ready to ride.  it had a 60 inch wheelbase which meant a passenger could ride in reasonable comfort and a real full coverage fairing. it was a little topheavy.  previously, i had an 1100rs that weighed 50 lbs less but the coverage was not in the same league as the rt.  the original r100rt may have come in a little under 600 lbs, but look what it didn't have.  no abs, skinny bike tires, far less stout construction.
i just don't think you can get what you want for under 600lbs. 
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #79 on: August 01, 2021, 07:35:14 AM »
Along with any of the modern V7 variants from Guzzi, I always thought the 2020 Triumph Bonneville Black would be a cool bike for a small, capable, reliable touring mount... :thumb: :bow: :boozing: :cool: :wink: :smiley:





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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #80 on: August 01, 2021, 08:04:10 AM »
JJ, haven't done any touring on my 2016 Bonnie 1200 yet, but I wouldn't hesitate to do so.  The bike isn't a lightweight, but is fairly low while still having good seat to peg distance. 

At this time, the bike is equipped with a set of Givi pannier mounts (well-made .... sturdy) and a light weight set of Givi E21 Monokey bags.  I have a Cortech bag with built in bungees that easily attaches behind the rider on the passenger section of the saddle for additional capacity.  Since the majority of my 'camping' has been in mom and pop motels the past several years, no rear rack installed for tent, sleeping bag, etc.  But Givi makes a rack that'll work with these pannier mounts.

The T120 gets good mileage, close to 50mpg, which translates to somewhere between 170 - 190 miles per tank.  Roughly 80hp with a ton of torque down low in the rpm range.

I would hate to have to change the rear tire while on a trip.  Stock mufflers are unfortunately in the way of rear axle removal.  Single sided swing arms and lug nut mounted wheels have spoiled me.  Wire wheels on the Bonnie aren't tubeless.

Couple of pics.........





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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #81 on: August 01, 2021, 08:29:13 AM »
after reading some of these replies and taking a ride yesterday on it, I think I'll stick with the MG spec 542# 2002 California Stone, yes a little heavier than that with lights and bags, etc.
Even though most of my touring these days is behind a one-ton truck pulling a 5th-wheel, I wouldn't hesitate to ride that bike cross country.
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Offline jcctx

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #82 on: August 01, 2021, 10:20:34 AM »
Bit late to this party, but will relate an encounter at Sturgis about 2001~ camped next to a young man on his way back from Alaska. He was riding a 250 Honda (the small cruiser) on his way home to the midwest (forget the state). Said he had had no problems other than a worn out rear tire and the small gas tank (about 150 miles IMS). Said he could maintain about 60 MPH on the freeway if forced to use them. He had a full camping set up and only had duffle bags for storage and a softbag of some kind on the luggage rack. I am sure that bike qualified as a "touring bike"111

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #83 on: August 01, 2021, 10:37:00 AM »
Bit late to this party, but will relate an encounter at Sturgis about 2001~ camped next to a young man on his way back from Alaska. He was riding a 250 Honda (the small cruiser) on his way home to the midwest (forget the state). Said he had had no problems other than a worn out rear tire and the small gas tank (about 150 miles IMS). Said he could maintain about 60 MPH on the freeway if forced to use them. He had a full camping set up and only had duffle bags for storage and a softbag of some kind on the luggage rack. I am sure that bike qualified as a "touring bike"111

Everywhere is within walking distance if you have the time.

Being able to maintain 60 is about 30 MPH shy of what is currently needed on most highways/.
« Last Edit: August 01, 2021, 10:39:38 AM by Perazzimx14 »
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Offline kingoffleece

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #84 on: August 01, 2021, 10:45:15 AM »
I'd be really happy if Guzzi expands the V85 range to include a more road going bike.  Don't need a full fairing like my old Norge, and I don't need two up capacity.  Time will tell.
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Offline guzzisteve

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #85 on: August 01, 2021, 11:09:35 AM »
If I can't hold up my EV, LM3, V700, I'll just run the sidecar rig full time. Cal2/SCF sidecar. Not going to SB at all NOR buying a new bike.
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #86 on: August 01, 2021, 11:54:03 AM »
Hi All,                                                                        8-1-21

My first "tourer" was a 2007 HD Sportster 1200 (white) with windshield, side bags and tail rack.  It weighed a little over 550 pounds and I rode it around Lake Superior, through Maine, Mass and New Hampshire.  It also made it to Virginia, the Carolinas and points west. It was a great bike, reliable, more than enough power, stable and comfortable for 3-5 hours at a time, heated seat and grips and there were dealerships all over the place. It had a single disc on the front so it was limited in the twisties, but adequate. 

Be well, stay well,
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #87 on: August 01, 2021, 11:59:36 AM »
if you want full wind protection,i think it is difficult to get all you want in a touring bike below a certain size and weight.  the best one i had was a 2004 r1150rt.  the specs put it at 630 lbs ready to ride.  it had a 60 inch wheelbase which meant a passenger could ride in reasonable comfort and a real full coverage fairing. it was a little topheavy.  previously, i had an 1100rs that weighed 50 lbs less but the coverage was not in the same league as the rt.  the original r100rt may have come in a little under 600 lbs, but look what it didn't have.  no abs, skinny bike tires, far less stout construction.
i just don't think you can get what you want for under 600lbs.
1983 Honda GL650 Silverwing Interstate is 529 lbs wet.
2010 Honda NT700VA ABS is 571 lbs wet.

Both were equipped with shaft drive, integrated hard bags. and frame mounted fairing.

Both also were equipped with 5 speed transmissions. Would be nice to see a dct or at least a 6 speed transmission. Current choices from Honda offer either chain drive or else a 1200 that weighs 667 lbs wet.

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #88 on: August 01, 2021, 12:04:24 PM »


1983 Honda GL650 Silverwing Interstate is 529 lbs wet.
2010 Honda NT700VA ABS is 571 lbs wet.

Both were equipped with shaft drive, integrated hard bags. and frame mounted fairing.

Both also were equipped with 5 speed transmissions. Would be nice to see a dct or at least a 6 speed transmission. Current choices from Honda offer either chain drive or else a 1200 that weighs 667 lbs wet.

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #89 on: August 01, 2021, 12:19:15 PM »
I'd be really happy if Guzzi expands the V85 range to include a more road going bike.  Don't need a full fairing like my old Norge, and I don't need two up capacity.  Time will tell.

I have been hoping for something like this myself as I have said previously. Something lighter than my 1400 but a little more substantial than my V7lll.
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