Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 04:52:33 PM

Title: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 04:52:33 PM
Hello, I'm a beginner rider and quite a large Individual. It's for this reason that a sub-300cc first motorcycle isn't an option. I'm attempting to find a balance between a lighter weight bike with a conservative cylinder capacity and a bike that's big enough to adequately and safely support me.

I've done extensive research and when compared on a spreadsheet with other makes/models with similar specifications, I found that the V7 III Stone might best check the boxes, with its 461 lbs curb weight, 744cc engine, 463 lbs weight capacity and upright seating position.

I wish to ask the forum if it might be too much bike for a beginner though? I admit that I'm feeling sorta intimidated. Thank you.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: malik on August 25, 2020, 05:32:32 PM
For a beginner, I'd be happier recommending an Enfield single - the 300 & the 500 are similar weights, the riding position is comfortable and the footpegs are a short step to the ground (important when learning), the handing is exceptionally light, and they are by no means intimidating. They are easy to pick up when they go over (you will drop it, it's normal, even after you've got the hang of things), economical to run, fairly cheap to buy, I've a maye of around 120kg (fluctuating), although an experienced rider, really enjoys knocking around on his 300, albeit a second bike in the garage. They are just so easy to ride. Whatever bike you go on to after that, you'll always have a soft spot for the long stroke single.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: stonelover on August 25, 2020, 05:50:27 PM
I, like Malik, love the thumpers.  That said I think the V7 would be a good starter and keeper. Not so much oomph to get you into trouble, but enough to get you out if the situation arises.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Dave Swanson on August 25, 2020, 06:19:46 PM
I think the Stone is a great beginner bike that you can grow into and not tire of.   Many years ago my first bike was a Honda CB750.   I was just careful with the throttle at first (first week!).  Hey I was 18. 
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 06:23:14 PM
For a beginner, I'd be happier recommending an Enfield single - the 300 & the 500 are similar weights, the riding position is comfortable and the footpegs are a short step to the ground (important when learning), the handing is exceptionally light, and they are by no means intimidating. They are easy to pick up when they go over (you will drop it, it's normal, even after you've got the hang of things), economical to run, fairly cheap to buy, I've a maye of around 120kg (fluctuating), although an experienced rider, really enjoys knocking around on his 300, albeit a second bike in the garage. They are just so easy to ride. Whatever bike you go on to after that, you'll always have a soft spot for the long stroke single.

The Interceptor 650 has a reasonable 473 lbs curb weight, 648cc parallel twin engine and 402 lbs weight capacity.

Royal Enfield quality has a history of being atrocious though. We love them in the U.S., because they're vintage bikes that have recently been reintroduced here, but read and watch online reviews from Indians, where they've been consistently built and sold for many decades, and you'll find overwhelmingly negative comments.

The only advantage that an Interceptor 650 has over a V7 III Stone is price point, but that might be a wash when maintenance and repairs are considered - not to mention the loss of riding time because of it.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: SportsterDoc on August 25, 2020, 06:24:53 PM
My comments, circa Feb 2017, are still valid for V7II:

1. Love the low end torque...and I am already accustomed to H-D Sportsters.
2. Love the 5.8 gallon fuel tank
3. Love the light weight (436#)
4. Love accessibility for checking spark plugs
5. Love  the black powder coated alloy wheels (does not show grime and I really appreciate tubeless tires)
6. Love key access to seat removal (two bolts on Bonneville and one bolt on Sportsters)
7. Love the seat height...not too low...not to high
8. Love the storage under the seat for a small tool bag, spare fuses, spare spark plugs, 6x9 zip lock bag of schematics, etc.
9. Love readability of the gauges...although the numbers could be a tad bigger for 70 year old eyes
10. Love the ground clearance and lean angle capabilities
11. Love the shaft drive
12. Air filter (AP8104924) is inexpensive at $8 - $9
13. Spark plugs (NGK CPR8EB-9) can be ordered from O'Reilly's for $4.49 each
14. Yuasa YTX14-BS battery equivalent is stocked at my local O'Reillys (ETX14), a factory filled AGM for $102.99
15. The 3 relays (headlight on after startup, start and injectors) are the same part number (AP8224462) and are only about $7
16. Appreciate easy access to air filter, fuses and battery, although 3 relays are under the fuel tank
17. Most sensors (and injectors) are easy access (right head temp, oil pressure switch, engine RPM, etc), but some are not (neutral switch, TPS, coils)
18. Seat has been comfortable for up 6 hour days, thus far; whereas both Sportsters and Bonneville seat required upgrades for more than 50 miles.

Negative was fueling issues, which I understand V7III resolved.

How good is the local MG dealer?

Not happy with the one in Las Vegas.   
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bobic69 on August 25, 2020, 06:28:45 PM
Having owned a V7, I'd say it's a perfect beginner's bike. Relatively low and light with not too much grunt but enough to keep you happy when you're more experienced.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 06:39:58 PM
My comments, circa Feb 2017, are still valid for V7II:

1. Love the low end torque...and I am already accustomed to H-D Sportsters.
2. Love the 5.8 gallon fuel tank
3. Love the light weight (436#)
4. Love accessibility for checking spark plugs
5. Love  the black powder coated alloy wheels (does not show grime and I really appreciate tubeless tires)
6. Love key access to seat removal (two bolts on Bonneville and one bolt on Sportsters)
7. Love the seat height...not too low...not to high
8. Love the storage under the seat for a small tool bag, spare fuses, spare spark plugs, 6x9 zip lock bag of schematics, etc.
9. Love readability of the gauges...although the numbers could be a tad bigger for 70 year old eyes
10. Love the ground clearance and lean angle capabilities
11. Love the shaft drive
12. Air filter (AP8104924) is inexpensive at $8 - $9
13. Spark plugs (NGK CPR8EB-9) can be ordered from O'Reilly's for $4.49 each
14. Yuasa YTX14-BS battery equivalent is stocked at my local O'Reillys (ETX14), a factory filled AGM for $102.99
15. The 3 relays (headlight on after startup, start and injectors) are the same part number (AP8224462) and are only about $7
16. Appreciate easy access to air filter, fuses and battery, although 3 relays are under the fuel tank
17. Most sensors (and injectors) are easy access (right head temp, oil pressure switch, engine RPM, etc), but some are not (neutral switch, TPS, coils)
18. Seat has been comfortable for up 6 hour days, thus far; whereas both Sportsters and Bonneville seat required upgrades for more than 50 miles.

Negative was fueling issues, which I understand V7III resolved.

How good is the local MG dealer?

Not happy with the one in Las Vegas.

The only issue in your post is the question, because there's no Moto Guzzi dealer in the state of Oregon. I would need to purchase the bike from a California dealer and have it shipped. Do these bikes require special mechanics? If so, that kills the option.   :sad:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: john fish on August 25, 2020, 07:30:47 PM
I learned on a BMW R100 a long time ago.  It's roughly equivalent to a V7 in weight and size and power.  It's a fine size to learn on.  My first question is: have you sat on one?   Comfort is hugely important.  If it's not comfortable, don't buy it.  If it's comfortable, you'll be fine.

I'd call around about the mechanics.  Ask here, obviously, if anyone is available in your area.  Don't fall for the old "Guzzis are easy to work on.  Do the maintenance yourself."  The fact is: Guzzis are easy to work on but if you don't want to do it, don't do it.  There are lot's of Asian machines out there in the same rough size and weight class and they probably have dealers in your area.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 07:56:40 PM
I learned on a BMW R100 a long time ago.  It's roughly equivalent to a V7 in weight and size and power.  It's a fine size to learn on.  My first question is: have you sat on one?   Comfort is hugely important.  If it's not comfortable, don't buy it.  If it's comfortable, you'll be fine.

I'd call around about the mechanics.  Ask here, obviously, if anyone is available in your area.  Don't fall for the old "Guzzis are easy to work on.  Do the maintenance yourself."  The fact is: Guzzis are easy to work on but if you don't want to do it, don't do it.  There are lot's of Asian machines out there in the same rough size and weight class and they probably have dealers in your area.

Being that there are no dealers here, I'll search for someone selling a used one, so that I can learn how it feels to sit on one.

Unfortunately, most Asian standard bikes have a modern (futuristic) appearance. The few classically styled ones, such as the Kawasaki W800, don't equal the the V7's specifications.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: LongRanger on August 25, 2020, 08:45:51 PM
Hey Doc, great to hear from you again, albeit on the “other side.”

My V7C had a very sensitive rear brake and was prone to locking. Not sure if this was resolved on later generations, but that would be my only caveat in recommending a V7 for a new rider. Otherwise, it’s a very mild and agile bike, but it’ll move out when you need to.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kiwi_Roy on August 25, 2020, 08:56:07 PM
Having owned a V7, I'd say it's a perfect beginner's bike. Relatively low and light with not too much grunt but enough to keep you happy when you're more experienced.

Hey, I represent that LOL
My V7III is my first and last new bike, I love the great range and light weight, I have 17,000 km on the clock in my first year of ownership.
I wouldn't hesitate to ride this across the country, plenty fast and lots of power, I can still remember when a 750 was a BIG bike
I'm coming down from an 1100 Griso.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 09:42:29 PM
For a beginner, I'd be happier recommending an Enfield single - the 300 & the 500 are similar weights, the riding position is comfortable and the footpegs are a short step to the ground (important when learning), the handing is exceptionally light, and they are by no means intimidating. They are easy to pick up when they go over (you will drop it, it's normal, even after you've got the hang of things), economical to run, fairly cheap to buy, I've a maye of around 120kg (fluctuating), although an experienced rider, really enjoys knocking around on his 300, albeit a second bike in the garage. They are just so easy to ride. Whatever bike you go on to after that, you'll always have a soft spot for the long stroke single.

As a follow up, I've learned that Royal Enfield offers a 3 year warranty with unlimited mileage and roadside assistance. It seems they're attempting to win consumer confidence.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: trippah on August 25, 2020, 09:53:27 PM
another great thumper is the Suzuki Savage (S-60) which is easy to ride, wont go too fast and is a bit heavier making it stable for a heavier rider.  Otherwise the RE Bullet would be a good choice..as well as the V7 I suspect.  Get proper training,,too many people not paying attention on the road these days.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: john fish on August 25, 2020, 09:53:46 PM

Unfortunately, most Asian standard bikes have a modern (futuristic) appearance. The few classically styled ones, such as the Kawasaki W800, don't equal the the V7's specifications.

Truthyness there.  Aesthetically, some of those Asian bikes are, um, unfortunate looking.  I hope someone is close and will let you try one.  Here's a site to check ergos:

https://cycle-ergo.com/
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 09:56:26 PM
another great thumper is the Suzuki Savage (S-60) which is easy to ride, wont go too fast and is a bit heavier making it stable for a heavier rider.  Otherwise the RE Bullet would be a good choice..as well as the V7 I suspect.  Get proper training,,too many people not paying attention on the road these days.

I suspect it was safer to ride in the "old days", when idiots weren't behind the wheel of a car while staring at a cellphone.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 25, 2020, 09:57:35 PM
Truthyness there.  Aesthetically, some of those Asian bikes are, um, unfortunate looking.  I hope someone is close and will let you try one.  Here's a site to check ergos:

https://cycle-ergo.com/

Great site. Thanks!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: s1120 on August 26, 2020, 06:13:01 AM
If your a large person, I can see a V7 being a great first, and longer bike. It has good power so you will grow into it, but it is not peaky, and hard hitting like a lot of the asian bikes. Big enough that you fit, but not so big that it over powers you. Standard platform makes it easy to handle, and balance. I think its a good choice. Other then the lack of dealers that was brought up...   
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: usedtobefast on August 26, 2020, 10:16:19 AM
Ok, I'll be the odd person here and recommend a Suzuki SV-650, 2017 or newer. 

Reasons for a SV-650: Way more dealers, better suspension and brakes, better resale value if you decide you don't like riding or decide to move to a bigger/faster bike in the future, nothing quirky or odd about it, ridiculously reliable, does everything well, has no real issues, can usually fine a decent clean used one, can also find great discounts on new ones.

If you are mechanically inclined, like you replace your car/truck alternator, a Guzzi is very easy to take care of.  But ... all sorts of quirky things.  Like a sticker on the bike and the service manual lists different valve clearance specs.  The service manual, on the same page, list two different ways on checking the oil level (one place says screw in the dipstick, 1/3 page lower it says not to) ... also says to drive it 10 miles before checking the oil level vs. the Suzuki's sight glass (so 3 seconds to do a check).  Oil quantity ... put in the amount listed in the service manual and that is too much.  Transmission oil level listed as too much (probably because there is some residual left in there when changing?).  1/2 plastic & 1/2 metal fuel filter in tank.  Get the clutch cable adjustment wrong and you kill your throwout bearing.  Suspension is very basic.  And more.

So if you like machinery and paying attention to it and caring for it, a Moto Guzzi can be a wonderful thing. 

But if you just want to add gas, press start button, and go, the SV-650 has zero quirks.

Also, you might want to check out the V-Strom 650.  It sits a bit taller, has more seat/peg/ground room.  But is is like 70lbs heavier and around $1000 more expensive.


Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: slowmover on August 26, 2020, 11:37:35 AM
I’m with Mr. Fish. Some bikes just make my eyes hurt.Get something beautiful.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: OldMojo on August 26, 2020, 01:02:54 PM
I’m with Mr. Fish. Some bikes just make my eyes hurt.Get something beautiful.

This.

If you're not tempted to keep glancing back at it as you walk away from the parking lot, you have the wrong bike.

Don't know if I would recommend a bike with cafe ergos as a first bike. Comfort is a large component of confidence.

I would think that a Triumph Speedmaster from a few years back might be a good starter bike for a bigger fella. Never having ridden one, I'll rely on others to confirm or refute this.

Can't say that I would recommend a new bike for a beginner. Get something cheap enough that you can pay cash for, used enough that you can drop without remorse, but new enough that you can easily get parts when you do bend something.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: TimmyTheHog on August 26, 2020, 01:58:32 PM
Although V7 wasn't my first motorcycle, it is the first one I had to do a lot of things with.

It is light, large fuel tank, friendly seat height, nimble thru town, minimal maintenance (did had some gremlins), super comfy on the highway.

Also it is one of the few nowadays actually still LOOKS like a motorcycle and not a spaceship.

Only sold it for a more dirt-orientated tourer and tbh, lack of dealer support.

Without repeating much of what other said, yes, it is a great beginner bike, and would had been my long term bike if weren't because i like dirt more now :P
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 26, 2020, 04:46:53 PM
Ok, I'll be the odd person here and recommend a Suzuki SV-650, 2017 or newer. 

Reasons for a SV-650: Way more dealers, better suspension and brakes, better resale value if you decide you don't like riding or decide to move to a bigger/faster bike in the future, nothing quirky or odd about it, ridiculously reliable, does everything well, has no real issues, can usually fine a decent clean used one, can also find great discounts on new ones.

If you are mechanically inclined, like you replace your car/truck alternator, a Guzzi is very easy to take care of.  But ... all sorts of quirky things.  Like a sticker on the bike and the service manual lists different valve clearance specs.  The service manual, on the same page, list two different ways on checking the oil level (one place says screw in the dipstick, 1/3 page lower it says not to) ... also says to drive it 10 miles before checking the oil level vs. the Suzuki's sight glass (so 3 seconds to do a check).  Oil quantity ... put in the amount listed in the service manual and that is too much.  Transmission oil level listed as too much (probably because there is some residual left in there when changing?).  1/2 plastic & 1/2 metal fuel filter in tank.  Get the clutch cable adjustment wrong and you kill your throwout bearing.  Suspension is very basic.  And more.

So if you like machinery and paying attention to it and caring for it, a Moto Guzzi can be a wonderful thing. 

But if you just want to add gas, press start button, and go, the SV-650 has zero quirks.

Also, you might want to check out the V-Strom 650.  It sits a bit taller, has more seat/peg/ground room.  But is is like 70lbs heavier and around $1000 more expensive.

I genuinely appreciate your advice, but the bikes you're suggesting aren't anywhere near the type that interest me. I seek something with a classic style.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: SportsterDoc on August 26, 2020, 06:12:15 PM
No special mechanics involved.
Changing fluid on engine,  transmission and final drive is not complicated.
Valve checking or ajustment is very, very easy access.

Local dealership sales, parts and service brought no complaints. It was the owner with whom I had words...as I did not appreciate him moving my bike so that he could park his Jaguar in the space where I was parked. He was apologetic at the time, but later his true personality showed through... probably embarrassed him in front of his employees.

in 2012 I bought a Triumph in Simi Valley California while I lived in Las Vegas and there was no dealership at that time in southern Nevada. It was never an issue. The size of the rear tire was not common so I bought a spare and kept it in the garage.

These days it's very simple to order parts online.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: SportsterDoc on August 26, 2020, 06:30:55 PM
Hey Doc, great to hear from you again, albeit on the “other side.”

My V7C had a very sensitive rear brake and was prone to locking. Not sure if this was resolved on later generations, but that would be my only caveat in recommending a V7 for a new rider. Otherwise, it’s a very mild and agile bike, but it’ll move out when you need to.

Well stated.
Although the V7II and III are now anti-lock brakes.
"See" you back on the CB 1100 forum.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on August 26, 2020, 08:35:08 PM
Wild1_OR -- I understood you say you are a beginner without a motorcycle.  If I understood you correctly, you have the wrong starting point.  Here is the correct starting point: http://team-oregon.org/endorsement/eintermediate/

Because you are a quite a large individual with all that implies, for your own safety you must continue your training with http://team-oregon.org/advanced/

As a minimum, I recommend the Riders Skills Practice and the Precision Maneuvering courses.

When I took my Mustang open-tracking (you have some nice courses in OR) my instructors told me the best investment was not in my car but my track time.  They were right and I was always the last off the course.

After you've completed your courses you will not only be a safer (to you and others) rider but you will be closer to making a decision on your ride.

Best wishes.  Send pictures.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kiwi_Roy on August 26, 2020, 08:50:37 PM
Why is it whenever anyone asks for advice on a beginner bike everyone tries to steer them to anything else but a Guzzi.
A V7 or Breva small block is a perfect beginners bike, great brakes, reliable inexpensive and something you can keep
Plus which it comes with this forum, that alone is a good reason to recommend it.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: SmithSwede on August 26, 2020, 11:24:35 PM
I think a V7 small block is about the perfect “beginner bike.”   

Mild enough to learn on.  But so capable that you may never “outgrow” it.   

Heck, even if you think you outgrew it, you may find yourself downsizing and returning to the same recipe 10 years later. 
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Muzz on August 27, 2020, 03:02:54 AM
I think a V7 small block is about the perfect “beginner bike.”   

Mild enough to learn on.  But so capable that you may never “outgrow” it.   

Heck, even if you think you outgrew it, you may find yourself downsizing and returning to the same recipe 10 years later.

Prescott here has summed it up perfectly.

I still have my Breva from 16 years ago, these were the first generation of the one you are considering.  One thing I do like about it is that it doesn't have a power band as such, just gets a bit busier at about 5000 rpm.  In other words, the smooth even power delivery is far less likely to get you in to trouble than a bike that turns in to a wailing banshee when you least expect it.  Having said that, they are a very capable bike that will tour just as easily as it will tootle around town.

You mention servicing.  The Guzzi engine is a very basic design and is very easy to service and work on generally.  Most here on WildGuzzi do their own servicing, and I have lost count of the number of new riders who learnt to mechanic on their Guzzi simply because the dearships tend to be a bit sparse.  Plenty of assistance is available here from some very knowledgeable people.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: SteveRivet on August 27, 2020, 08:02:31 AM
Hello, I'm a beginner rider and quite a large Individual. It's for this reason that a sub-300cc first motorcycle isn't an option. I'm attempting to find a balance between a lighter weight bike with a conservative cylinder capacity and a bike that's big enough to adequately and safely support me.

I've done extensive research and when compared on a spreadsheet with other makes/models with similar specifications, I found that the V7 III Stone might best check the boxes, with its 461 lbs curb weight, 744cc engine, 463 lbs weight capacity and upright seating position.

I wish to ask the forum if it might be too much bike for a beginner though? I admit that I'm feeling sorta intimidated. Thank you.

As a former MSF Instructor, I think a V7 would be perfect, especially if you're a big guy.  Power delivery is smooth and won't overwhelm, and unlike a smaller bike will have enough power to help a big guy get out of the way if needed.  Ergonomics are neutral - which is a good thing - and maint is easy, especially with no chain to deal with.  Decent aftermarket to tailor to your needs.  Wholeheartedly recommend.

-Steve
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: alanp on August 27, 2020, 09:59:21 AM
Just a few more comments re what others have posted;

Rear brake locking up on a V7C;  maybe, but not an issue on a V7II or III, which are the models you want.  The C is about 10 years old now.  Newer bikes have ABS.
Poor fueling; not an issue on the III, but maybe the II.  However, a Beetle map is desirable for either bike and completely solves all fueling issues.  Installing the maps is easy, and as with most things you may need to do on a V7, there is a wealth of information available on here and from the great members.
 
I think this is the best motorcycle forum in existence for getting help with your bike.  I have had Suzuki's, Yamahas, Triumphs, and BMWs and have never found the quality or rapidity of help solving problems that you can get on this site.  So while I understand the concern over a lack of dealer support, I think that is largely overcome by the fact that these ARE about the easiest modern bikes to service and maintain and you have this site to back you up.  My V7II has 15,000 miles and I have never needed a dealer for anything but tire changes so far.  Another good thing IMHO is that if you aren't particularly mechanically inclined (like me), The V7's are about the best modern bikes you can have.  I have learned so much from owning a V7 and other older similar Guzzis, because when I have needed to fix something it is usually very approachable and even I, with the help of this site, can figure it out. 
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: SportsterDoc on August 27, 2020, 10:31:25 AM
V7, V7II, V7III are classic naked basic M/C.
No tupperware...just a few annoying stickers to remove.


(https://i.ibb.co/hXts7Jh/1-Dart-saddle-16-Mar-2017.jpg) (https://ibb.co/hXts7Jh)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Tkelly on August 28, 2020, 03:13:41 PM
My wife is selling her 2013 v7 special in yellow and black.We are in S W  Wisconsin.Bike has everything fixed for comfort and performance.Call Deb if interested 608 574 7880.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bulldog9 on August 28, 2020, 03:15:54 PM
IMHO, a sub $2000 beater you won't care when you drop is best for a 'first bike', though as others have said, the V7 is a fantastic beginners bike you can grow into.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Guzzi Gal on August 28, 2020, 04:10:48 PM
Wild1_OR, you've come to the right place!!!

A V7 III is absolutely a good beginners bike!  For my first motorcycle, I gifted myself a 2017 V7 III Aniversario for my 50th birthday, sight unseen.  I sat on a Special and a Stone before making my decision to buy but I'd never ridden one.  I did a ton of research and decided to purchase one from Moto International in Washington State (now closed) and have 'er shipped.  My thinking was that "Ani" would be my one and done forever bike.  I've not regretted that decision.   

My previous experience was limited to an hour learning to ride my high school BFs Honda on an old runway back in the mid-80s and tooling around on my aunts 60s Lambretta scooter.  I didn't really get around to properly learning until after a 35-year hiatus when my husband surprised me with a matching set of little Honda Metropolitans for our 30th anniversary.  We signed up for the MSF course bought all the ATGATT and the rest is history.

My ergo's are as follows:

5'5"
135 lbs
31" inseam
Old lady strength (none)

I can pretty much put my bare feet flat, and if I wear a boot with a 1" heel, all is well.  Weight is something to consider if you're on the smaller side, as once they start to tip, there's no stopping them if they outweigh you by several hundred pounds.  That said, If I can pick mine, you should be able to pick up yours.
(https://i.ibb.co/GvGh2V2/IMG-3235.jpg) (https://ibb.co/GvGh2V2)
   
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 28, 2020, 08:37:30 PM
Wild1_OR -- I understood you say you are a beginner without a motorcycle.  If I understood you correctly, you have the wrong starting point.  Here is the correct starting point: http://team-oregon.org/endorsement/eintermediate/

Because you are a quite a large individual with all that implies, for your own safety you must continue your training with http://team-oregon.org/advanced/

As a minimum, I recommend the Riders Skills Practice and the Precision Maneuvering courses.

When I took my Mustang open-tracking (you have some nice courses in OR) my instructors told me the best investment was not in my car but my track time.  They were right and I was always the last off the course.

After you've completed your courses you will not only be a safer (to you and others) rider but you will be closer to making a decision on your ride.

Best wishes.  Send pictures.

Yes, I already checked them out and will be taking the beginner course. It's booked through October, but I'm not in a rush.  :thumb:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: keener on August 28, 2020, 10:14:38 PM
All of the V7 bikes are beginner bikes ...go for it and you may end up just keeping it. :cheesy:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: antmanbee on August 29, 2020, 07:47:26 AM
Wild1,

I see that you asked a similar question on the Suzuki Savage forum.
My perspective from owning both an S40 and a 750 Breva (pretty much the same as a V7 first gen but with different bodywork)
is that they are both pretty good bikes to begin on that you can still enjoy and be satisfied with after your learning curve.
I would tend to lean towards the 750 Guzzi cosidering that you are a big guy.
You probably could find a good Breva 750 or an S40 for around $2k.
The S40 is probably cheaper to own long term as there are a lot of them around and used parts are plentiful.
Both the Guzzi and the S40 are pretty durable and trouble free.
The S40 and the V7 have considerably different ergonomics. I prefer the Guzzi ergonomics because I feel bore balanced with my feet under me (not forward)
and a slight lean forward to the bars.
Both are a lot of fun.
Whenever I ride either the S40 or the Breva I say to myself, I would be happy and satisfied with this if it was my only bike.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 29, 2020, 12:45:56 PM
Wild1,

I see that you asked a similar question on the Suzuki Savage forum.
My perspective from owning both an S40 and a 750 Breva (pretty much the same as a V7 first gen but with different bodywork)
is that they are both pretty good bikes to begin on that you can still enjoy and be satisfied with after your learning curve.
I would tend to lean towards the 750 Guzzi cosidering that you are a big guy.
You probably could find a good Breva 750 or an S40 for around $2k.
The S40 is probably cheaper to own long term as there are a lot of them around and used parts are plentiful.
Both the Guzzi and the S40 are pretty durable and trouble free.
The S40 and the V7 have considerably different ergonomics. I prefer the Guzzi ergonomics because I feel bore balanced with my feet under me (not forward)
and a slight lean forward to the bars.
Both are a lot of fun.
Whenever I ride either the S40 or the Breva I say to myself, I would be happy and satisfied with this if it was my only bike.

Yes, I want a classically styled motorcycle, which to me meant a cruiser. Therefore, I initially had my heart set on either an S40 or Rebel 500, as a beginner bike. Through this journey, I read that cruisers may not be ideal for beginners, due to the raked forks, forward pegs and relaxed seating positions, which may make them challenging to control in abrupt situations.
While that didn't disqualify them, I then discovered retro standard bikes, such as the Yamaha SR400, Kawasaki W800 and Royal Enfield Interceptor 650. My perception of Triumph and Moto Guzzi, was always that they're expensive bikes with larger engines - basically, the European equivalents of Harley-Davidson.
Then, I stumbled upon the V7 III, which changed that perception. I believe it's a beautifully crafted Italian retro standard bike that won't break the bank. All of the bikes I've mentioned here were on my list at some point and two, maybe three of them, are still on it.
I've learned a lot these past two months about makes, models, types and motorcycles in general. It's a great experience and each day brings me closer to choosing and then finding the one.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kev m on August 29, 2020, 01:27:01 PM
Yes, I want a classically styled motorcycle, which to me meant a cruiser. Therefore, I initially had my heart set on either an S40 or Rebel 500, as a beginner bike. Through this journey, I read that cruisers may not be ideal for beginners, due to the raked forks, forward pegs and relaxed seating positions, which may make them challenging to control in abrupt situations.


Though more or less true in comparison to other designs someone wholly oversold you on the significance, especially when it comes to the bikes you mentioned. I doubt the average rider would even know the difference nevermind the beginner.

Look I whole-heartedly think a V7 could be a great bike for a beginner. I wouldn't look twice at an S40, but that's taste. I'd sooner take a Rebel of those two. That said there's nothing about handling and capability that should matter between the three to a beginner.

If I were to say anything I would also suggest you consider a used 883 Sporty. Cheap to buy and maintain, simple, forgiving and can take a beating and carry a big guy.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Moparnut72 on August 29, 2020, 01:48:59 PM
I had to lookup to see what an S40 is. Nope, you will outgrow that thing in a heartbeat. My choices would a Royal Enfield 650, 883 Sportster and a V7. I would eliminate the Enfield due to chain drive. That leaves the Sporty and the Guzzi. Both of these would make excellent first bikes that could be kept and used for a lifetime. I just got a V7 to augment my big Guzzi Audace for around town and short jaunts in the twisties. At some point it will become my main ride as I get too old and feeble to handle the Audace. It will do just fine for touring as well. The Sporty is another good choice. Bullet proof, belt drive which can be changed without tearing half of the bike apart. In my opinion the best bike Harley builds and unfortunately is on the critical list. The one negative is that the Sporty weighs roughly 100 lbs more than the V7. I would choose the V7 but I am kinda biased although I had a Sporty for a couple of years and liked it too.
kk
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: stonelover on August 29, 2020, 02:14:20 PM
I chose my 2016 Stone II over the S40 because I didn't want forward pegs. Very satisfied.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 29, 2020, 02:18:38 PM
Though more or less true in comparison to other designs someone wholly oversold you on the significance, especially when it comes to the bikes you mentioned. I doubt the average rider would even know the difference nevermind the beginner.

Look I whole-heartedly think a V7 could be a great bike for a beginner. I wouldn't look twice at an S40, but that's taste. I'd sooner take a Rebel of those two. That said there's nothing about handling and capability that should matter between the three to a beginner.

If I were to say anything I would also suggest you consider a used 883 Sporty. Cheap to buy and maintain, simple, forgiving and can take a beating and carry a big guy.

Your information is helpful. I wish to keep the wet weight of the bike under 500 lbs. The only HD that comes close to that weight is the Street 500 and it's 65 lbs heavier than the V7 III.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kev m on August 29, 2020, 02:26:48 PM
Your information is helpful. I wish to keep the wet weight of the bike under 500 lbs. The only HD that comes close to that weight is the Street 500 and it's 65 lbs heavier than the V7 III.

Your bike, your call.

That said weight is a funny thing.

Back when I had an EVO RK in the garage next to a Oilhead BMW (RS) the 700#  King felt lighter than the over 100# actually lighter RS.

Similarly our 07 XL1200Lr at nearly 600# felt lighter than our low-500s# Guzzi Breva 1100.

In both cases the heavier but lower center of gravity bikes hid the weight when compared to taller but lighter bikes.

Hell my athletic/strong, but diminutive wife had more trouble with her R65 Airhead then her first Harley 883L for that same reason.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 29, 2020, 03:24:31 PM
Poor fueling; not an issue on the III, but maybe the II.  However, a Beetle map is desirable for either bike and completely solves all fueling issues.  Installing the maps is easy, and as with most things you may need to do on a V7, there is a wealth of information available on here and from the great members.

I was reading through threads, saw references to a map and it reminded me of your suggestion. I don't want to sidetrack this thread, but will you share a brief summary of a Beetle map?
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Moparnut72 on August 29, 2020, 03:35:43 PM
For a V7lll you won't need a Beetle map. Mine fuels perfectly through the whole range. My Audace not so much. I had to make modifications.
kk
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Muzz on August 29, 2020, 04:38:25 PM
For a V7lll you won't need a Beetle map. Mine fuels perfectly through the whole range. My Audace not so much. I had to make modifications.
kk

Same for the Breva.  I also gather you can't do anything much with the Breva map anyway. (Not that it needs it; it's about spot on anyway)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: malik on August 29, 2020, 06:55:47 PM
For a V7lll you won't need a Beetle map. Mine fuels perfectly through the whole range. My Audace not so much. I had to make modifications.
kk

Briefly, a map is the instructions to the computer in the ECU controlling the air, fuel & spark in response to the various inputs. If a map is well written from the factory (like the Breva & the V7 Classic), then there is no issue, and can mostly be ignored. The single throttle body V7's & the V7 II were given a new ECU which was not quite so robust, hence the interest in after market maps. Some other guzzi models did not tolerate changes of mufflers well either, as well as other issues, and some clever people found out what was inside the ECU's instructions and made it freely available to the world. The small dealer base & the tools & training available (or lack of same) from Guzzi may have had something to do with the popularity of aftermarket tools as well.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kev m on August 29, 2020, 07:11:28 PM
Briefly, a map is the instructions to the computer in the ECU controlling the air, fuel & spark in response to the various inputs. If a map is well written from the factory (like the Breva & the V7 Classic), then there is no issue, and can mostly be ignored. The single throttle body V7's & the V7 II were given a new ECU which was not quite so robust, hence the interest in after market maps. Some other guzzi models did not tolerate changes of mufflers well either, as well as other issues, and some clever people found out what was inside the ECU's instructions and made it freely available to the world. The small dealer base & the tools & training available (or lack of same) from Guzzi may have had something to do with the popularity of aftermarket tools as well.

Point of order, it's not the "robustness" of the latter maps that's the issue it's the complexity combined with the unintended consequences of meeting emissions standards at certain points and the attempts to balance that with optimal performance.

I tend to retain stock mapping on my bikes even if I know there are potentially some RCHs of performance to gain from abandoning them and shutting off the O2 sensors.

Is there A NEED for a new map, NO.

ARE there benefits to it, sure.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 29, 2020, 07:12:50 PM
Briefly, a map is the instructions to the computer in the ECU controlling the air, fuel & spark in response to the various inputs. If a map is well written from the factory (like the Breva & the V7 Classic), then there is no issue, and can mostly be ignored. The single throttle body V7's & the V7 II were given a new ECU which was not quite so robust, hence the interest in after market maps. Some other guzzi models did not tolerate changes of mufflers well either, as well as other issues, and some clever people found out what was inside the ECU's instructions and made it freely available to the world. The small dealer base & the tools & training available (or lack of same) from Guzzi may have had something to do with the popularity of aftermarket tools as well.
Point of order, it's not the "robustness" of the latter maps that's the issue it's the complexity combined with the unintended consequences of meeting emissions standards at certain points and the attempts to balance that with optimal performance.

I tend to retain stock mapping on my bikes even if I know there are potentially some RCHs of performance to gain from abandoning them and shutting off the O2 sensors.

Is there A NEED for a new map, NO.

ARE there benefits to it, sure.

Thanks for the informative summary.  :thumb:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: bad Chad on August 29, 2020, 07:21:54 PM
My wife is selling her 2013 v7 special in yellow and black.We are in S W  Wisconsin.Bike has everything fixed for comfort and performance.Call Deb if interested 608 574 7880.

I can vouch for this bike and owner.   Immaculate, and cared for like your moms life depended on it!  It looks fantastic!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: GeorgiaGuzzi on August 29, 2020, 08:02:10 PM
To the OP, as someone who is both tall AND fat, let me assure you that you will look silly on a S40. I love the bikes, they’re awesome, and there’s a tasty cafe conversion. However, I’m modestly 6’1” and a solid 300 lbs. When I’m skinny I’m around 275. Anyways, cruiser style bikes with a narrow silhouette (like s40, 883, rebel) tend to highlight girth, and if your taller you’re cramped on them. Standards like you have mentioned generally have a taller seat height which lessens the effect of “its a gorilla on a tricycle”! Just my opinion fwiw. Check the Royal Enfield Himalayan in addition to the V7.

Oh and this forum is among the best anywhere. If you get a V7 you WILL have plenty of online help!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on August 29, 2020, 08:06:35 PM
To the OP, as someone who is both tall AND fat, let me assure you that you will look silly on a S40. I love the bikes, they’re awesome, and there’s a tasty cafe conversion. However, I’m modestly 6’1” and a solid 300 lbs. When I’m skinny I’m around 275. Anyways, cruiser style bikes with a narrow silhouette (like s40, 883, rebel) tend to highlight girth, and if your taller you’re cramped on them. Standards like you have mentioned generally have a taller seat height which lessens the effect of “its a gorilla on a tricycle”! Just my opinion fwiw. Check the Royal Enfield Himalayan in addition to the V7.

Oh and this forum is among the best anywhere. If you get a V7 you WILL have plenty of online help!

This is awesome advice! It was a concern that I hadn't voiced, because I was sorta self-conscious about it.  :embarrassed:  Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kev m on August 29, 2020, 08:23:30 PM
This is awesome advice! It was a concern that I hadn't voiced, because I was sorta self-conscious about it.  :embarrassed:  Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

Meh, I mean I'm "only" 5'10" and uh 225-240 depending on uh lunch.

But I look MORE like a monkey humping a football on my V7s than I did on our Sportsters.

Not that I would let that stop me from loving and riding our V7s.

I haven't figured out how to link and post photos from my phone or I'd at least post one on the V7.

Trust me when I say my last Sportster was bigger.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on August 29, 2020, 08:29:32 PM
Kev m -- you know I'm admirer of your Photoshop work.  But you've ruined all that because I can't unsee your image of a monkey humping a football. :blank:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: GeorgiaGuzzi on August 29, 2020, 09:30:15 PM
Meh, I mean I'm "only" 5'10" and uh 225-240 depending on uh lunch.

But I look MORE like a monkey humping a football on my V7s than I did on our Sportsters.

Not that I would let that stop me from loving and riding our V7s.

I haven't figured out how to link and post photos from my phone or I'd at least post one on the V7.

Trust me when I say my last Sportster was bigger.

Maybe something like an xr sporty. However, most 883’s have a narrow, low silhouette. Kinda like a 48. And when I’m on a sporty I look kinda silly. I’ve never rode a V7, there’s a reason I got my Quota and also am a fan of stelvio’s and Norges.

However, why would you want to saddle a new rider with the hassle of having to learn to put up with all the Harley bro’s telling him he needs to get a “real” Harley? Or every time he goes to the dealer they try to talk him into a big twin? Or the whole “lifestyle” image that goes with Harley ownership? Tbh, I wouldn’t recommend a Harley to a new rider because most Harley riders aren’t riders. They’re weekend posers who want to ride 15 miles to their local bar and talk about how loud pipes save lives. Now you and I know that Harley makes some good bikes, and the sporty, even an 883, set up correctly, is great even for someone my size. Sportsters don’t get their proper respect and a Sporty rider will have to mentally give the middle finger to most other Harley riders. that’s something a new rider has to learn thru experience imho.  But that is just my opinion, so it’s not worth much cept to me! 😎
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kev m on August 29, 2020, 10:24:39 PM
Ok well how you "look' on a bike? That's important? Meh. There's a reason my wife closes her eyes when we have sex.

Posers who want you to ride "something else" are all the same be it a Harley big twin or something from JAPanInc. or BMW or, gasp, Guzzi.

Although I've taken some delight in the form of the bikes I've chosen it's never really been important if others shared that delight. I mean shit I can't please everyone (I have trouble enough pleasing aforementioned wife and kids), so really when I choose a bike it's all about selfish old me.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Muzz on August 31, 2020, 04:25:37 AM

But I look MORE like a monkey humping a football on my V7s than I did on our Sportsters.

I think that is politely called "information overload" Kev!  :gotpics: :grin:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: john fish on August 31, 2020, 06:13:43 AM
This is awesome advice! It was a concern that I hadn't voiced, because I was sorta self-conscious about it.  :embarrassed: 

That's understandable, human, and normal.  You're just one of the few people honest enough to admit it. 

You've filtered through an enormous number of bikes and found a reasonable choice.  Good work. 
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Blaufeld66 on September 01, 2020, 08:48:29 AM
I tend to retain stock mapping on my bikes even if I know there are potentially some RCHs of performance to gain from abandoning them and shutting off the O2 sensors.

In the USA, are there any periodical revisions to a vehicle?
Here, you must do the first after 5 years of construction, then every 2 years.
If there is anything modified (as emissions, tire sizes, signals, exhausts and light system) that is not within original specs, you are passable of a fine if stopped and, more importantly, insurance doesn' cover you or damages done by you.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: egschade on September 01, 2020, 10:45:04 AM
In the USA, are there any periodical revisions to a vehicle?
Here, you must do the first after 5 years of construction, then every 2 years.
If there is anything modified (as emissions, tire sizes, signals, exhausts and light system) that is not within original specs, you are passable of a fine if stopped and, more importantly, insurance doesn' cover you or damages done by you.

In the US it varies by state. In New Jersey, motorcycle inspections were discontinued (even though our registration rates were tripled). About the only worry is being pulled over for overly loud exhaust or something visibly wrong like lights out or sketchy customization.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kev m on September 01, 2020, 02:43:14 PM
In the USA, are there any periodical revisions to a vehicle?
Here, you must do the first after 5 years of construction, then every 2 years.
If there is anything modified (as emissions, tire sizes, signals, exhausts and light system) that is not within original specs, you are passable of a fine if stopped and, more importantly, insurance doesn' cover you or damages done by you.

In the US, annual emissions testing varies by state, many/most don't test bikes.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 09, 2020, 09:05:26 PM
Wild1_OR, you've come to the right place!!!

A V7 III is absolutely a good beginners bike!  For my first motorcycle, I gifted myself a 2017 V7 III Aniversario for my 50th birthday, sight unseen.  I sat on a Special and a Stone before making my decision to buy but I'd never ridden one.  I did a ton of research and decided to purchase one from Moto International in Washington State (now closed) and have 'er shipped.  My thinking was that "Ani" would be my one and done forever bike.  I've not regretted that decision.   

My previous experience was limited to an hour learning to ride my high school BFs Honda on an old runway back in the mid-80s and tooling around on my aunts 60s Lambretta scooter.  I didn't really get around to properly learning until after a 35-year hiatus when my husband surprised me with a matching set of little Honda Metropolitans for our 30th anniversary.  We signed up for the MSF course bought all the ATGATT and the rest is history.

My ergo's are as follows:

5'5"
135 lbs
31" inseam
Old lady strength (none)

I can pretty much put my bare feet flat, and if I wear a boot with a 1" heel, all is well.  Weight is something to consider if you're on the smaller side, as once they start to tip, there's no stopping them if they outweigh you by several hundred pounds.  That said, If I can pick mine, you should be able to pick up yours.
(https://i.ibb.co/GvGh2V2/IMG-3235.jpg) (https://ibb.co/GvGh2V2)
   

I had to bite my tongue when I initially read your post, because our purchasing experiences were eerily similar and I didn't want to jinx the deal.  :smiley:

There's no Moto Guzzi dealership in Oregon, so I couldn't even sit on one. I also had done a lot of research, so I inquired at GP Motorcycles in San Diego, CA about purchasing a new motorcycle. It was an excellent price with shipping included, but I felt frustrated with the destination and preparation fees that all dealerships charge. Then I noticed a 2018 V7 III Stone in Azzurro Elettrico with only 2,003 miles on their site. I would not only avoid the additional fees, but save even more on the price. I learned that someone had purchased the bike from them, but then traded for a V9 Bobber. I decided it would be my forever bike and went ahead with the purchase.

The bike has the rear fender eliminator kit and looks amazingly sexy! I'm waiting for it to arrive and I'll be taking the beginner course next month.

I wish to share that in addition to the great price and low shipping cost (they have a contract with a shipping company), GP Motorcycles was extremely supportive and patient with the transaction - they're even including the rear fender, in case I choose to return it to stock. There was absolutely no pressure throughout the process. I also wish to thank everyone on the forum who has provided their valuable advice. Anyway, a couple of pictures are attached.

(https://i.ibb.co/5jBxK1m/2018-Moto-Guzzi-V7-III-Stone-Azzurro-Elettrico-1.jpg) (https://ibb.co/5jBxK1m)


(https://i.ibb.co/B6xnPdB/2018-Moto-Guzzi-V7-III-Stone-Azzurro-Elettrico-2.jpg) (https://ibb.co/B6xnPdB)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Muzz on September 09, 2020, 10:27:07 PM
Enjoy your new ride when it arrives.

Looks great, and I am sure you will love it. :thumb:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 09, 2020, 10:38:34 PM
Wild1_OR  -- I'll be at GPM tomorrow for 900 mile service on my V7 III if you want more pictures, etc of your excellent choice.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 09, 2020, 11:04:49 PM
Wild1_OR  -- I'll be at GPM tomorrow for 900 mile service on my V7 III if you want more pictures, etc of your excellent choice.

Yes!!! Thank you!!!

Say hello to Rafael too!  :thumb:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: greer on September 10, 2020, 05:01:46 AM
Oh boy, that blue is nice!

Sarah
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: GeorgiaGuzzi on September 10, 2020, 09:17:00 AM
Beautiful bike!!! Enjoy it!  :thumb:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Kev m on September 10, 2020, 09:42:36 AM
Oh boy, that blue is nice!

Sarah

^^^^^^^^^

SO MUCH THIS

SO MUCH



Enjoy that gorgeous bike!

Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 10, 2020, 05:49:43 PM
Back from V7 III's 900 mile service.  GPM's labor was $110/hour and service took 3 hours.  I removed the Stucchi engine guards beforehand.  I supplied engine, gearbox and final drive lubricants.  I was onsite 6 hours.  Took some pictures for Wild1_OR.  They tried, not very hard, to sell me a V85.  They had a V9.  And a full range of new Ducatis, Aprillas, KTMs, and Husqvarnas plus one Ural sidecar.  Nice range of used including a Triumph Thruxton R.  Be still my heart and keep my hand away from my wallet.  After seeing this wonderful inventory I knew the V7 III was the perfect urban assault vehicle I needed.

When I got home I discovered what I thought was Odometer display mode was actually Trip mode because GPM switched to Odometer mode for in/out miles and gear position was no longer display.  Before today I never pushed the Mode button even out of curiosity.  Since gear position is not displayed in Odometer mode, I'll go back to running in Trip mode as it came from Cadre.

My excitement this afternoon will be setting the tachometer alerts to 6,000 low and 7,000 high and putting the engine guards back on.

But this is Wild1_OR's thread not mine.

Rafael moved the V7 III so I could examine it and take some pictures.  The V7 III is in Almost New condition.  No wear on footpeg rubber or other locations.  Tires look about the same as mine, ie, no big lean angles or center-only wear.  Minor wear on what seems to be faint stress marks on the seat and some scratches on steering head from too much stuff on PO's ignition key ring.  All emissions equipment is in place and apparently untouched.  Restoring the rear fender and lights will take a day of work because many pieces need to be unscrewed and rescrewed.  I didn't take the seat off to see how the PO tapped into the wiring.  GPM is including the fender with the motorcycle but I didn't ask to see it.  The V7 is ready to go: GPM is waiting for shipper pickup.

I forgot to ask Rafael when it was last serviced.

Before you put the fender back on take a look at Kev m's Photoshop magic and tell me you don't want some of that: https://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=96990.msg1533793#msg1533793

I'm looking for a Rosso Rovente painter (drat forgot to ask GPM, I guess I'll call while they remember me).

Pictures will be in next post.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: TimmyTheHog on September 10, 2020, 06:02:56 PM
Back from V7 III's 900 mile service.  GPM's labor was $110/hour and service took 3 hours. 

<snip>

Hold up...3 hours?!?!?!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 10, 2020, 08:07:08 PM
Yeah Service Manual page 44 says 100 minutes for 900 mile, 110 minutes for 6,200 mile and 120 minutes for 12,400 mile services.  Even factoring in Italian optimism, designer underestimates, and San Diego cost-of-living (20% above US average), 360 minutes kinda pushes on my support-your-MG-dealership boundary.  On the other hand, they are a very good dealership supporting a wide range of riding styles with European motorcycles on the floor and accessories in stock rather than "We'll order it for you."  I'll stick with them until I can't afford it.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 10, 2020, 08:26:28 PM
Back from V7 III's 900 mile service.  GPM's labor was $110/hour and service took 3 hours.  I removed the Stucchi engine guards beforehand.  I supplied engine, gearbox and final drive lubricants.  I was onsite 6 hours.  Took some pictures for Wild1_OR.  They tried, not very hard, to sell me a V85.  They had a V9.  And a full range of new Ducatis, Aprillas, KTMs, and Husqvarnas plus one Ural sidecar.  Nice range of used including a Triumph Thruxton R.  Be still my heart and keep my hand away from my wallet.  After seeing this wonderful inventory I knew the V7 III was the perfect urban assault vehicle I needed.

When I got home I discovered what I thought was Odometer display mode was actually Trip mode because GPM switched to Odometer mode for in/out miles and gear position was no longer display.  Before today I never pushed the Mode button even out of curiosity.  Since gear position is not displayed in Odometer mode, I'll go back to running in Trip mode as it came from Cadre.

My excitement this afternoon will be setting the tachometer alerts to 6,000 low and 7,000 high and putting the engine guards back on.

But this is Wild1_OR's thread not mine.

Rafael moved the V7 III so I could examine it and take some pictures.  The V7 III is in Almost New condition.  No wear on footpeg rubber or other locations.  Tires look about the same as mine, ie, no big lean angles or center-only wear.  Minor wear on what seems to be faint stress marks on the seat and some scratches on steering head from too much stuff on PO's ignition key ring.  All emissions equipment is in place and apparently untouched.  Restoring the rear fender and lights will take a day of work because many pieces need to be unscrewed and rescrewed.  I didn't take the seat off to see how the PO tapped into the wiring.  GPM is including the fender with the motorcycle but I didn't ask to see it.  The V7 is ready to go: GPM is waiting for shipper pickup.

I forgot to ask Rafael when it was last serviced.

Before you put the fender back on take a look at Kev m's Photoshop magic and tell me you don't want some of that: https://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=96990.msg1533793#msg1533793

I'm looking for a Rosso Rovente painter (drat forgot to ask GPM, I guess I'll call while they remember me).

Pictures will be in next post.

I appreciate your post - a lot. It didn't occur to me to ask when it was last serviced. My hope is that it was serviced before being resold but I'll call them tomorrow. I should've also inquired if the tool kit is included. You mentioned faint stress marks on the seat and some scratches on steering head. It that upon close inspection or is it clearly visible when the bike is approached?

Kev M's wonderful array of Photoshop options makes for a tough decision. I think that I would either leave it as-is, without the rear fender, or opt for the 'full monty' shown in the last picture.

The wait will be the most challenging part of the process.  :popcorn:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: greer on September 11, 2020, 05:13:24 AM
Oh Lordy, that "All Blue" Kev M drummed up is it for me.  I feel for you on the wait, Wild1.  In the meantime, the bits and pieces for the rear fender don't look too numerous:

https://cadrecycle.com/v7-iii_stone_750_2017/

Just in case you want to swap it back to stock.

Sarah
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 11, 2020, 10:15:40 AM
Oh Lordy, that "All Blue" Kev M drummed up is it for me.  I feel for you on the wait, Wild1.  In the meantime, the bits and pieces for the rear fender don't look too numerous:

https://cadrecycle.com/v7-iii_stone_750_2017/

Just in case you want to swap it back to stock.

Sarah

Kev M was kind enough to Photoshop a profile view without the fender. I'm really on the fence about which I like most. I feel that with the fender it has a more classic appearance and without the fender it has a racer inspired appearance.

(https://i.ibb.co/Wgsh836/2018-V7-III-Stone-Azzurro-Elettrico.jpg) (https://ibb.co/Wgsh836)


(https://i.ibb.co/JChxYNT/2018-V7-III-Stone-Azzurro-Elettrico-No-Rear.jpg) (https://ibb.co/JChxYNT)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Socalrob on September 11, 2020, 11:07:14 AM
If you are on the wet side of Oregon you may want the full rear fender.  Dry side, aesthetics can drive the choice.

After owning various bikes I ended up with a V7iii Annivisario.  Big gas tank, shaft drive, ABS, torquey engine.  I like that I can wring it through the gears, each to redline in the first 3 or 4, hit 5th, and I am only doing 85 or so and not going to jail.  Yet it will also keep up on fast LA freeways and can cruise at 90mph all day if you feel the need.

The engine fueling is spot on and it is an easy bike to ride smooth.  The power is satisfying yet not likely to run you up the rear of the car in front of you as long as you pay attention.  The handling is smooth too, no surprises other than accidentally dragging the outside edge of my boot in some corners while in the mountains.

Economics would be the only downside as a first bike.  If you are a place in life where saving a couple of thousand bucks on a first bike is critical, then I see arguments for getting a more common, cheaper bike as a first ride. 
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 11, 2020, 11:08:13 AM
Yeah that Kev m is a magician with Photoshop although his verbal imagery is ... disturbing. :laugh:

I'll start with high resolution pictures of items of interest.  BTW I don't know why my camera wasn't focusing as well as it should.  I'll have to look into that.  Let me know if you want me to go back for more pictures -- GPM is only three miles away and I think they're still hoping to sell me a V85 (but that Thruxton R is so tempting).

(https://i.ibb.co/J2NHG9H/Brake-Tail-Turn-Lights.jpg) (https://ibb.co/J2NHG9H)


(https://i.ibb.co/VvqmMZj/Dashboard.jpg) (https://ibb.co/VvqmMZj)


(https://i.ibb.co/74sSfzD/Seat.jpg) (https://ibb.co/74sSfzD)

These pictures of a fender GPM is selling give you some idea what's involved in installing it https://www.ebay.com/itm/Moto-Guzzi-V7-III-Stone-Racer-2017-19-Stock-OE-Rear-Fender-with-Taillight/184356489566?fits=Model%3AV7+III%7CMake%3AMoto+Guzzi&hash=item2aec80c95e:g:w6oAAOSw2TdfBOZH

The dashboard scratches aren't that noticeable.  Many people install a faux-graphite shield.  Others like me keep non-motorcycle keys in their pockets.

I rubbed the marks on the seat but no change.  Tire Black will probably hide them but if they are a concern for you and GPM allows it, we can swap stock seats.  I was looking at Cadre's catalog while my credit card was in the other room and ended up buying this extra Alcantara seat I'm now afraid to use.  But it was on sale!  I'll figure something out.

(https://i.ibb.co/wYVRLf7/2S000921.jpg) (https://ibb.co/wYVRLf7)


I called the painter yesterday.  Stone paint matching is going to be tricky -- might take an hour or eight hours.  Apparently the computer vision thing doesn't do that well for this purpose.  Rough estimate is $500.  So for several reasons I'm thinking of going glossy like this.

(https://i.ibb.co/hsD7zFV/Gloss-Red.jpg) (https://ibb.co/hsD7zFV)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 11, 2020, 11:43:50 AM
Evaporative canister (I don't know why ibb rotated it) and secondary air:

(https://i.ibb.co/1Gqyw6w/Evap-Canister.jpg) (https://ibb.co/1Gqyw6w)


(https://i.ibb.co/qYRXgvR/Secondary-Air.jpg) (https://ibb.co/qYRXgvR)

Footpeg and rear tire:

(https://i.ibb.co/fvb9zPf/Footpeg.jpg) (https://ibb.co/fvb9zPf)


(https://i.ibb.co/y84Y3wh/Rear-Tire.jpg) (https://ibb.co/y84Y3wh)

And a profile:

(https://i.ibb.co/v1TWmhN/P1030245.jpg) (https://ibb.co/v1TWmhN)

That's all I have.  Let me know if you want more.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 11, 2020, 12:18:50 PM
Yeah that Kev m is a magician with Photoshop although his verbal imagery is ... disturbing. :laugh:

I'll start with high resolution pictures of items of interest.  BTW I don't know why my camera wasn't focusing as well as it should.  I'll have to look into that.  Let me know if you want me to go back for more pictures -- GPM is only three miles away and I think they're still hoping to sell me a V85 (but that Thruxton R is so tempting).

These pictures of a fender GPM is selling give you some idea what's involved in installing it https://www.ebay.com/itm/Moto-Guzzi-V7-III-Stone-Racer-2017-19-Stock-OE-Rear-Fender-with-Taillight/184356489566?fits=Model%3AV7+III%7CMake%3AMoto+Guzzi&hash=item2aec80c95e:g:w6oAAOSw2TdfBOZH

The dashboard scratches aren't that noticeable.  Many people install a faux-graphite shield.  Others like me keep non-motorcycle keys in their pockets.

I rubbed the marks on the seat but no change.  Tire Black will probably hide them but if they are a concern for you and GPM allows it, we can swap stock seats.  I was looking at Cadre's catalog while my credit card was in the other room and ended up buying this extra Alcantara seat I'm now afraid to use.  But it was on sale!  I'll figure something out.

I called the painter yesterday.  Stone paint matching is going to be tricky -- might take an hour or eight hours.  Apparently the computer vision thing doesn't do that well for this purpose.  Rough estimate is $500.  So for several reasons I'm thinking of going glossy like this.

The Alcantara two-tone café style seat is sharp! The combination of glossy Rosso Rovente and the new seat will make your bike even more of a head turner.

I sent a private message to you regarding the seat.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: egschade on September 11, 2020, 12:29:13 PM
I'm intending to trim my fender rather than remove it. Hasn't been a priority as most of it is hidden by my panniers.


(https://i.ibb.co/c6zNHcQ/fender-cut.png) (https://ibb.co/c6zNHcQ)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 11, 2020, 12:56:35 PM
I'm intending to trim my fender rather than remove it. Hasn't been a priority as most of it is hidden by my panniers.


(https://i.ibb.co/c6zNHcQ/fender-cut.png) (https://ibb.co/c6zNHcQ)


Yeah, that gives the rear end a whole different appearance. Sort of a balance between having the full fender and none.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Daleroso on September 11, 2020, 02:12:33 PM
Hey there, no offense intended but I've gotta ask, when you say big do you mean tall & muscular or rotund? The difference will affect the ergonomics & comfort. That said the V7III is a fine beginner bike generally speaking.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wildroamer on September 11, 2020, 02:54:32 PM
I vote keep the fender. Beauty, either way!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 11, 2020, 03:47:20 PM
Evaporative canister (I don't know why ibb rotated it) and secondary air:

(https://i.ibb.co/1Gqyw6w/Evap-Canister.jpg) (https://ibb.co/1Gqyw6w)


(https://i.ibb.co/qYRXgvR/Secondary-Air.jpg) (https://ibb.co/qYRXgvR)


What is IBB? Is the canister being rotated an issue?
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 11, 2020, 05:35:30 PM
ibb (imgbb.com) is the website where Bert host the pictures.

It looks like the EVAP has been modified, so that the gas overflow does not go into the canister.
You can read more about that by doing a search or go here (which you are already a member) https://www.guzzitech.com/forums/threads/evap-removal-from-v7iii.17879/

The secondary air supply (SAS) appears to be stock; not modified. This should be fine and you can consider blocking them later if you want to install aftermarket exhaust mufflers.

I thought the canister on the bike had been rotated.  :laugh:

I just read the thread and it seems to be an interesting and simple modification with optimum results.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Griso8V on September 11, 2020, 06:27:07 PM
Wow that is a really nice bike!  Looks great and you will really enjoy it! 
You mentioned that you will be taking the MSF course; if at all possible, if they are available use their bikes.  From what I remember from when I took the course the bikes they have are pretty ratty but usable.  A few people actually dropped the bikes so just in case use the bikes that belong to the MSF if at all possible. 
Enjoy the Guzzi
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 11, 2020, 09:14:25 PM
Yes the picture not the canister was rotated.  The canister is in the proper position with regard to hoses and orientation.  Orientation is important for proper functioning.

Wild1_OR -- your evaporative canister installation is original and functional from a visual perspective.  It matches mine exactly as well as pages 234-236 of the service manual.  Here's the routing per the emissions label on the fender.

(https://i.ibb.co/VNgFTwR/Emissions-Label.jpg) (https://ibb.co/VNgFTwR)

Ya gotta know what to look for but the breather valve is in there.

(https://i.ibb.co/1m0fcwK/P1030257.jpg) (https://ibb.co/1m0fcwK)

WRT emissions modifications, don't unless you have fueling problems.  MG did a great job tuning the V7 III so stick with it.  But if you just gotta fool around, research GuzziDiag and buy the Lonelec adapter.  BTW good investment just to understand your ECU better.

WRT modifications, Rafael said you would be getting stronger shock springs.  I urge you continue to pursue that suspension upgrade path, both front and rear.  If you are careful with your research, you should find comfort for about $1,000.  LED lighting should come next, for both visibility and illumination reasons.  Heated grips (I like Koso) and vest (I'm an Aerostich fan).  Grip Puppies and Helmet Hook.  For the V7's classic looks I'm not a windscreen fan.  I wear earplugs and take the occasional Ibuprofen.  Wind noise up to 70mph isn't an issue except when other cars are in front of me and then it's noticeable down to 30mph.

I've mentioned my V7 will be my UAV.  Therefore I have the Givi tail rack with a Givi E300N2 top case.  It holds my C19 PPE while riding and my Bell DLX full face helmet and gloves when parked.

And replace the battery every 3 years.  Otherwise you'll be here whining about weird engine and electrical problems.  BORING.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 11, 2020, 09:21:32 PM
Wow that is a really nice bike!  Looks great and you will really enjoy it! 
You mentioned that you will be taking the MSF course; if at all possible, if they are available use their bikes.  From what I remember from when I took the course the bikes they have are pretty ratty but usable.  A few people actually dropped the bikes so just in case use the bikes that belong to the MSF if at all possible. 
Enjoy the Guzzi

It's really good advice.  :smiley:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 11, 2020, 09:34:45 PM
Yes the picture not the canister was rotated.  The canister is in the proper position with regard to hoses and orientation.  Orientation is important for proper functioning.

Wild1_OR -- your evaporative canister installation is original and functional from a visual perspective.  It matches mine exactly as well as pages 234-236 of the service manual.  Here's the routing per the emissions label on the fender.

(https://i.ibb.co/VNgFTwR/Emissions-Label.jpg) (https://ibb.co/VNgFTwR)

Ya gotta know what to look for but the breather valve is in there.

(https://i.ibb.co/1m0fcwK/P1030257.jpg) (https://ibb.co/1m0fcwK)

WRT emissions modifications, don't unless you have fueling problems.  MG did a great job tuning the V7 III so stick with it.  But if you just gotta fool around, research GuzziDiag and buy the Lonelec adapter.  BTW good investment just to understand your ECU better.

WRT modifications, Rafael said you would be getting stronger shock springs.  I urge you continue to pursue that suspension upgrade path, both front and rear.  If you are careful with your research, you should find comfort for about $1,000.  LED lighting should come next, for both visibility and illumination reasons.  Heated grips (I like Koso) and vest (I'm an Aerostich fan).  Grip Puppies and Helmet Hook.  For the V7's classic looks I'm not a windscreen fan.  I wear earplugs and take the occasional Ibuprofen.  Wind noise up to 70mph isn't an issue except when other cars are in front of me and then it's noticeable down to 30mph.

I've mentioned my V7 will be my UAV.  Therefore I have the Givi tail rack with a Givi E300N2 top case.  It holds my C19 PPE while riding and my Bell DLX full face helmet and gloves when parked.

And replace the battery every 3 years.  Otherwise you'll be here whining about weird engine and electrical problems.  BORING.

I don't intend to immediately make mechanical modifications and less than a handful of subtle appearance changes will be made. GPM set the suspension for the highest load capacity. Rafael suggested that I ride it that way for a while, then decide if it should be upgraded. LED lighting is a great suggestion, but it won't be ridden in rain or snow, so heated accessories may not be necessary.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: subin on September 12, 2020, 09:16:44 AM
...Wild1_OR -- your evaporative canister installation is original and functional from a visual perspective...

Bert is correct, I looked at the picture again and saw that it is from the other end of the EVAP can, so I thought that the hoses were removed :embarrassed:
I have retracted my earlier reply.

The V7 III's engine runs lean/hot to pass emission (like most of street motorcycles in the US). I prefer a cooler running engine.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 12, 2020, 09:56:53 AM
subin -- excellent point on engine temperature.  When I ride sea level to 6K in moderate temperatures, I don't feel any fueling changes.  When I go back to 2K, the engine seems to run a bit rougher although throttle response is the same.  Also does that in 100 degree city traffic.  And when I return to sea level in that heat, I've noticed more roughness going up a steep hill.  Everything back to normal the next morning.

This was before 900 miles where I kept the engine speeds low.  Now with the first service done, I'll be running higher engine speeds.  The Norge was happy there and I expect the V7 will be too.

If I encounter bothersome lean-running or overheating then I'll install a Bettlemap (I think there's one for the stock mufflers, etc).  If the secondary air has to come off then it will.

I am bothered by the one-way valve in the evaporative circuit.  The RE has the same apparently failure-prone thing.  I prefer an ECU-controlled valve.  I'm researching how something ECU-independent can be accomplished via a timer relay.  Maybe tied to engine vacuum or Neutral gear position.  Thoughts?
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 13, 2020, 02:44:38 AM
I'll share a brief story. When I was in my late teens, I was dating a girl that I met at the department store at which we worked. I had an automatic pickup truck and she had a blue metallic manual Fiat X1/9. The Fiat was better suited for dates, so we would take her car, but I didn't know how to drive a manual and it was awkward for both of us. One night, before leaving work for a date, she taught me how to drive stick in the near empty parking lot. Henceforth, I would drive when we went on dates and everything was right with the world.

The small Italian machine was an absolute blast and still the most fun vehicle I've driven. So here I am roughly 30 years later, about to learn on an Italian machine again, that's matte blue to boot. It certainly has brought back some fond memories. The car pictured is identical to the one that I enjoyed those many years ago.

(https://i.ibb.co/rsZvGw1/Fiat-X19.jpg) (https://ibb.co/rsZvGw1)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: subin on September 13, 2020, 08:14:04 AM
... I had an automatic pickup truck and she had a blue metallic manual Fiat X1/9...

My first car was a 1979 X1/9 that I bought in around 1988  :azn:
I have had one Harley and several different Japanese bikes after that, but some how ended with two Italian motorcycles now...
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 13, 2020, 12:57:29 PM
My first car was a 1979 X1/9 that I bought in around 1988  :azn:

Wasn't it a blast to drive?! 75 hp, 2100 lbs and the targa top removed felt fast.  :afro:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Muzz on September 14, 2020, 06:23:35 AM
Wasn't it a blast to drive?! 75 hp, 2100 lbs and the targa top removed felt fast.  :afro:

Wild1, is that photo of you on your avatar an old G9 Matchy of Ajay?
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: s1120 on September 14, 2020, 06:29:36 AM
Wasn't it a blast to drive?! 75 hp, 2100 lbs and the targa top removed felt fast.  :afro:

They were!  My step brother had one. Just a cool little gocart for the street!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: subin on September 14, 2020, 08:58:04 AM
Wasn't it a blast to drive?! 75 hp, 2100 lbs and the targa top removed felt fast.  :afro:

Yep, my first car, did not know about checking tire tread depth and rotate the tires. I wore out a set of brand new Dunlap tires in 6 months :evil: :evil:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 14, 2020, 05:05:33 PM
Wild1, is that photo of you on your avatar an old G9 Matchy of Ajay?

It's Marlon Brando wearing a Perfecto-style jacket and riding a 1950 Triumph Thunderbird 6T in the film The Wild One.

(https://i.ibb.co/vvywmxB/MB.jpg) (https://ibb.co/vvywmxB)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 14, 2020, 05:25:40 PM
W1 -- I didn't know what your answer would be but I knew it would be good.  And it was! :laugh:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 14, 2020, 05:51:03 PM
W1 -- I didn't know what your answer would be but I knew it would be good.  And it was! :laugh:

I watched the film years ago, before I became seriously interested in riding a motorcycle, then recently watched it again and it's one of my favorite films now.

Frankly, I don't understand the meaning of G9 Matchy of Ajay. 🤷
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 14, 2020, 10:06:50 PM
Matchless G80 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Matchless_G80

AJS https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AJS

I had one of each for a while.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Muzz on September 14, 2020, 10:40:22 PM
That ain't no T Bird.

!950-53 Matchless 500 with the flying "M" upside down on the tank.

You can see the "M" logo on the engine.  I don't think the ones we got out here had that particular one cast in the timing cover quite like that.

They used to break their cranks with monotonous regularity after they climbed up in the mileage.  The oil feed to the big ends came through a very narrow middle bearing on the crank.  The bearing wore....guess the rest! :evil:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 14, 2020, 10:58:48 PM
That ain't no T Bird.

!950-53 Matchless 500 with the flying "M" upside down on the tank.

You can see the "M" logo on the engine.  I don't think the ones we got out here had that particular one cast in the timing cover quite like that.

They used to break their cranks with monotonous regularity after they climbed up in the mileage.  The oil feed to the big ends came through a very narrow middle bearing on the crank.  The bearing wore....guess the rest! :evil:

After recently watching the film again, I searched online and every reference that I found states it's a Triumph. This is one of many articles:

https://ceearedee.com/automotive/triumph-thunderbird-brandos-bike/

Quote: In the book Triumph Motorcycles In America, you can see a letter from Triumph’s importers complaining to the producers as to the use of their machine in this film about “rowdy motorcycle gangs”.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on September 14, 2020, 11:18:53 PM
I'm with Muzz.  That's a Matchless G9 engine.

According to https://motorbikewriter.com/matchless-back-drawing-board/ Brando rode his own Triumph for the 1953 film.

(https://i.ibb.co/jRp3rPC/Marlon-Brandon-Triumph.jpg) (https://ibb.co/jRp3rPC)

 Brando apparently had a Matchless 600cc scrambler when an actor in New York.  But that picture with the upside-down M was not his motorcycle but rather belonged to stunt rider "Wally" Albright https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wally_Albright (credited in Wild One as cyclist).

Dang Muzz that was amazing!
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 14, 2020, 11:25:20 PM
I'm with Muzz.  That's a Matchless G9 engine.

According to https://motorbikewriter.com/matchless-back-drawing-board/ Brando rode his own Triumph for the 1953 film.

 Brando apparently had a Matchless 600cc scrambler when an actor in New York.  But that picture with the upside-down M was not his motorcycle but rather belonged to stunt rider "Wally" Albright https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wally_Albright (credited in Wild One as cyclist).

Dang Muzz that was amazing!

I understand now! I thought the picture was from the film.  :blank:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: greer on September 17, 2020, 06:07:27 AM
Any ETA on that bike Wild1?  I'd be near to the point of hiring a buddy with a truck.

Sarah
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 17, 2020, 08:30:57 AM
Any ETA on that bike Wild1?  I'd be near to the point of hiring a buddy with a truck.

Sarah

I'm getting to that point... fast! I was informed yesterday that it's been picked up from the dealership and it's currently in Las Vegas, awaiting a driver to Oregon with 30 bikes. It'll arrive by October 13th.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 27, 2020, 05:16:05 AM
I had ordered the NZI Rolling United helmet, but it's backordered from the factory with no ETA. Therefore, I decided to purchase the Scorpion Belfast helmet in Matte Blue Metallic instead. I found an excellent price and it's a better helmet, as it has a hand-laid fiberglass shell and hand-stitched Nappa leather.

(https://i.ibb.co/7z08zLW/Scorpion-Belfast-MBM.jpg) (https://ibb.co/7z08zLW)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: greer on September 27, 2020, 05:23:17 AM
You may have told us already, but how are you set on gloves, jacket and boots?

Sarah
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 27, 2020, 03:16:13 PM
You may have told us already, but how are you set on gloves, jacket and boots?

Sarah

All three are at the top of my Black Friday shopping list.  :smiley:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: greer on September 28, 2020, 05:04:48 AM
Good!  If you don't mind used gear, you might post a Want to Buy here on Swap Meet and on the Advrider.com Flea Market.  We've bought most of our gear this way over the years.  Check out the big V7 thread on Advrider, too:

https://advrider.com/f/threads/anybody-have-a-moto-guzzi-v7.835438/

Sarah
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 28, 2020, 02:14:24 PM
Good!  If you don't mind used gear, you might post a Want to Buy here on Swap Meet and on the Advrider.com Flea Market.  We've bought most of our gear this way over the years.  Check out the big V7 thread on Advrider, too:

https://advrider.com/f/threads/anybody-have-a-moto-guzzi-v7.835438/

Sarah

I appreciate the suggestion and I'll check them out. 👍
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: GeorgiaGuzzi on September 28, 2020, 03:11:59 PM
Gloves fit pretty standard. Boots as you know vary between manufacturers. Jackets, for some reason, almost always run at least 1-2 sizes SMALLER than advertised. I’m in an Olympia jacket that is 3x and it fits me Tight. I usually wear 2x in jackets and shirts, 3x in heavy winter coats that have to go over layers. Just so you have a frame of reference. So swing by a local bike shop and try on some jackets. Don’t be fooled into thinking you’ve suddenly ballooned, it’s the cut of the jackets. They do need to be relatively form fitting so in the event of an accident they stay in place. If you must purchase online, read the reviews! Helpful souls usually post how the sizing runs.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 28, 2020, 03:46:58 PM
Gloves fit pretty standard. Boots as you know vary between manufacturers. Jackets, for some reason, almost always run at least 1-2 sizes SMALLER than advertised. I’m in an Olympia jacket that is 3x and it fits me Tight. I usually wear 2x in jackets and shirts, 3x in heavy winter coats that have to go over layers. Just so you have a frame of reference. So swing by a local bike shop and try on some jackets. Don’t be fooled into thinking you’ve suddenly ballooned, it’s the cut of the jackets. They do need to be relatively form fitting so in the event of an accident they stay in place. If you must purchase online, read the reviews! Helpful souls usually post how the sizing runs.

I'm digging this jacket, as it's a cross between the classic and cafe styles:

http://milwaukeeleather.com/product/mens-utility-pocket-mc-jacket-2/

 :cool:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: GeorgiaGuzzi on September 29, 2020, 09:31:52 AM
I'm digging this jacket, as it's a cross between the classic and cafe styles:

http://milwaukeeleather.com/product/mens-utility-pocket-mc-jacket-2/

 :cool:

That’s a nice jacket! It’s got a zip-out liner so it’ll be good for chilly weather. You can’t really go wrong with leather except in the dog days of summer. At least here in GA when it’s 95 with 500% humidity! Lol. I have a leather jacket I wear in the cooler months.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 29, 2020, 10:06:30 AM
That’s a nice jacket! It’s got a zip-out liner so it’ll be good for chilly weather. You can’t really go wrong with leather except in the dog days of summer. At least here in GA when it’s 95 with 500% humidity! Lol. I have a leather jacket I wear in the cooler months.

With what you mentioned, I'm a little worried that it might be a snug fit, but it would be all the more reason to stick to a diet until the Spring riding season.  :undecided:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: john fish on September 29, 2020, 10:47:03 AM
With what you mentioned, I'm a little worried that it might be a snug fit, but it would be all the more reason to stick to a diet until the Spring riding season.  :undecided:

Hey, this is a family forum.  No foul language, please.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 29, 2020, 11:05:27 AM
Hey, this is a family forum.  No foul language, please.

(https://i.ibb.co/6ggMfFx/ROFL.jpg) (https://ibb.co/6ggMfFx)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on September 30, 2020, 04:58:21 PM
What happened to the rest of the posts?  ¯\_(ツ)_/¯
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 08, 2020, 10:15:02 PM
It's heeere!

(https://i.ibb.co/XzGcNNH/Polt.gif) (https://ibb.co/XzGcNNH)

My motorcycle arrived today! My first impression is that it's slightly smaller and lower than I thought - which is a good thing. I was aware of the wide seat, but it's significantly wider than I expected. I'm 5'11" and because of the seat width, I can barely get my feet flat on the ground. I gotta mention the wonderful side-to-side vibration on startup. :grin:

Is the key in the picture below OEM? I assumed it would say Motto Guzzi.

(https://i.ibb.co/DQd2VTr/20201008-143602.jpg) (https://ibb.co/DQd2VTr)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Tom H on October 08, 2020, 11:00:08 PM
YEAH!!!! :thumb: Enjoy!!

Tom
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on October 08, 2020, 11:35:38 PM
Quote
Is the key in the picture below OEM?
No. https://www.ilco.us/ilco-en
Quote
I assumed it would say Motto Guzzi.
They do.

(https://i.ibb.co/zX3Rt3h/Ignition-Key.jpg) (https://ibb.co/zX3Rt3h)

My 2012 Norge purchased used in 2018 came with two original keys.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 08, 2020, 11:47:12 PM
No. https://www.ilco.us/ilco-enThey do.

(https://i.ibb.co/zX3Rt3h/Ignition-Key.jpg) (https://ibb.co/zX3Rt3h)

My 2012 Norge purchased used in 2018 came with two original keys.

The bike came with only the one key. I've been researching it and I believe it's the V7 III spare, but I'm not certain. What did you receive with your V7 III?
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on October 08, 2020, 11:54:48 PM
Yeah I'm annoyed with myself because I didn't ask to see the keys when I inspected the V7 for you.

How did the seat cover look to you?  False alarm on my part?

Since you are new to motorcycling I expect you will soon develop arm and leg positions that are comfortable for you.  Ride at least 500 miles before changing the seat construction.  For instance, I found MG's firm, flat "1.5 size" seat more comfortable than the soft stock seat because I wasn't squeezed into a "bucket" behind the fuel tank.

RTFM.  At least twice.

Your jaw will probably be sore for a few weeks from grinning so much.  It'll go away in a few decades. :smiley:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on October 09, 2020, 12:10:06 AM
Two as pictured.  I'm going to send one to Keys4UrRide.com to make two spares.  They were able to duplicate the Norge transponder key for just $50 plus shipping.  Fast and good quality.

AF1 has OEM style keys https://www.af1racing.com/OEM-Moto-Guzzi-Key-Blank-GU32735510

My spares won't be OEM style.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 09, 2020, 12:15:46 AM
Yeah I'm annoyed with myself because I didn't ask to see the keys when I inspected the V7 for you.

How did the seat cover look to you?  False alarm on my part?

Since you are new to motorcycling I expect you will soon develop arm and leg positions that are comfortable for you.  Ride at least 500 miles before changing the seat construction.  For instance, I found MG's firm, flat "1.5 size" seat more comfortable than the soft stock seat because I wasn't squeezed into a "bucket" behind the fuel tank.

RTFM.  At least twice.

Your jaw will probably be sore for a few weeks from grinning so much.  It'll go away in a few decades. :smiley:

It's not a big deal, so don't fret over it. I'll call the dealership to inquire if they forgot to send it and if they don't have it, I'll purchase one online. It's odd that they sent a third party key. I wonder what happened with the two originals.

The seat isn't too bad. I was tired today, but I'm taking it to a leather shop that assured me it'll look like new and they'll put some protective stuff on the leather, for quite a reasonable price.

Is there a more narrow seat option for the V7 III? That's what I would really like to change.

Yeah, I can honestly say that I can't remember when I was last this excited about a new toy!  :bike-037:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 09, 2020, 12:19:34 AM
Two as pictured.  I'm going to send one to Keys4UrRide.com to make two spares.  They were able to duplicate the Norge transponder key for just $50 plus shipping.  Fast and good quality.

AF1 has OEM style keys https://www.af1racing.com/OEM-Moto-Guzzi-Key-Blank-GU32735510

My spares won't be OEM style.

It's for the V7 II. Is the V7 III the same part number?
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on October 09, 2020, 12:23:17 AM
Surprisingly affordable https://cadrecycle.com/product/oem-moto-guzzi-brown-beige-saddle-2s000921/

BMW https://www.af1racing.com/OEM-Moto-Guzzi-15-Ribbed-Seat-2S000265
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on October 09, 2020, 12:26:12 AM
Oops.  Here's the correct key blank and it's $40 cheaper https://www.af1racing.com/OEM-Moto-Guzzi-Key-Blank-2B003994

I'm pretty sure AF1 cuts keys.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 09, 2020, 12:41:00 AM
Oops.  Here's the correct key blank and it's $40 cheaper https://www.af1racing.com/OEM-Moto-Guzzi-Key-Blank-2B003994

I'm pretty sure AF1 cuts keys.

I like this key more. :grin: Being that I only have one key, I don't want to send it. I'll order it and have a local shop cut it.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 09, 2020, 01:04:53 AM
Surprisingly affordable https://cadrecycle.com/product/oem-moto-guzzi-brown-beige-saddle-2s000921/

BMW https://www.af1racing.com/OEM-Moto-Guzzi-15-Ribbed-Seat-2S000265

Seat 2S000921 is the same one that you bought for your bike, right? How much narrower is it than the OEM seat?
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: greer on October 09, 2020, 05:13:40 AM
You want to narrow the bike, so your legs to have a straight shot to the ground?  Ask the upholster to remove the seat cover while you're there, then the two of you look to see how much foam can be shaved away from the sides of the seat pan, and possibly some of the pan itself.  You can can take a look yourself if you don't mind using a flat screwdriver to pry loose the staples.  Those puffy plastic side plates also in crease your leg spraddle.  Here's my bike after trimming the seat and swapping to thinner metal side plates:


(https://i.ibb.co/LY4bMtr/DSCN6255.jpg) (https://ibb.co/LY4bMtr)


And here's a thread all about "seat straddle":

 https://wildguzzi.com/forum/index.php?topic=107099.msg1696828#msg1696828

Sarah
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: s1120 on October 09, 2020, 06:50:41 AM
As a new rider I would run the stock seat for a bit. Once you get some miles on it you will be better informed as to what, if anything you want to change on it.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: egschade on October 09, 2020, 09:02:00 AM
What footwear do you use when riding? My riding boots have a thick sole and heel which means I'm flat footed despite my 30" inseam. If I'm wearing sneakers (not for riding, just pushing the bike around) my heel doesn't touch the ground.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: subin on October 09, 2020, 09:12:13 AM
The V7 III should come with 2 keys. These do not have chip, I think, so the key blank is not as expensive.
I am also 30" inseam and wearing TCX casual riding boots with no heels, on a stock V7 III Stone night pack, I can comfortably land the balls of my feet on the ground.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: GeorgiaGuzzi on October 09, 2020, 11:40:15 AM
Congratulations on receiving your bike!  :thumb:

What others have said, give major changes a couple of weeks of riding. With a new bike I’m always tentative at first, extra tense, etc. as I get used to it I find I loosen up much more as I ride it, which changes ergos.

Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: malik on October 09, 2020, 05:01:21 PM

Is there a more narrow seat option for the V7 III? That's what I would really like to change.


The solo seat is narrower. I find it more comfotable. There is available an even more comfortable version of the solo seat - without the ribs on the sides, and with more plush cushioning. I think this was standard on the early V7 III Racer, and it is shown in the Guzzi Accesories catalogue. The sole seats work for me - 5'11 & a 33" inside leg - both feet flat on the ground & bent knees, on both the V7C & the V7S - the III should not be significantly different.

BTW, That key in the photo looks like it's cut from the standard ILCO key blank.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 09, 2020, 05:38:16 PM
The dealership is calling the original owner to inquire what happened with the OEM keys. Worse case scenario, they'll mail an OEM blank and I'll take it to be cut.

As suggested, I'll wait to determine how the seat feels after riding about 500 miles. If it still feels too wide, I'll replace it with a narrower Moto Guzzi seat.

Everyone has shared great advice.  :thumb:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 23, 2020, 09:01:36 AM
I need to get a VIN check done to register the motorcycle, since it came from California to Oregon. I searched online, but can't find where the VIN is located. Will someone please enlighten me? 🤷

Update: Is the VIN the same as the chassis number?

(https://i.ibb.co/37ss4Cs/MG-VIN.jpg) (https://ibb.co/37ss4Cs)
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Bert Remington on October 23, 2020, 09:59:28 AM
The VIN should be somewhere in your purchase paperwork and should match the number at the pictured location.  As I recall the engine number is down by the engine oil fill opening and they will also want to take pictures of the emissions stickers under the seat.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 23, 2020, 10:13:32 AM
The VIN should be somewhere in your purchase paperwork and should match the number at the pictured location.  As I recall the engine number is down by the engine oil fill opening and they will also want to take pictures of the emissions stickers under the seat.

Thank you!  :thumb:
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: subin on October 23, 2020, 11:38:30 AM
I need to get a VIN check done to register the motorcycle, since it came from California to Oregon. I searched online, but can't find where the VIN is located. Will someone please enlighten me? 🤷

Update: Is the VIN the same as the chassis number?

(https://i.ibb.co/37ss4Cs/MG-VIN.jpg) (https://ibb.co/37ss4Cs)


Yes on mine. If you look behind the head light, there is a metal plate with VIN number, but that number is hard to read. Next to the plate is the frame number as indicated in your picture from the manual. On mine, the VIN is the same as the frame number.
Title: Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
Post by: Wild1_OR on October 23, 2020, 12:31:28 PM
Yes on mine. If you look behind the head light, there is a metal plate with VIN number, but that number is hard to read. Next to the plate is the frame number as indicated in your picture from the manual. On mine, the VIN is the same as the frame number.

Perfect. Gracias!