Author Topic: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?  (Read 7264 times)

Offline Wild1_OR

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V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« on: August 25, 2020, 04:52:33 PM »
Hello, I'm a beginner rider and quite a large Individual. It's for this reason that a sub-300cc first motorcycle isn't an option. I'm attempting to find a balance between a lighter weight bike with a conservative cylinder capacity and a bike that's big enough to adequately and safely support me.

I've done extensive research and when compared on a spreadsheet with other makes/models with similar specifications, I found that the V7 III Stone might best check the boxes, with its 461 lbs curb weight, 744cc engine, 463 lbs weight capacity and upright seating position.

I wish to ask the forum if it might be too much bike for a beginner though? I admit that I'm feeling sorta intimidated. Thank you.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 04:54:32 PM by Wild1_OR »
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Offline malik

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #1 on: August 25, 2020, 05:32:32 PM »
For a beginner, I'd be happier recommending an Enfield single - the 300 & the 500 are similar weights, the riding position is comfortable and the footpegs are a short step to the ground (important when learning), the handing is exceptionally light, and they are by no means intimidating. They are easy to pick up when they go over (you will drop it, it's normal, even after you've got the hang of things), economical to run, fairly cheap to buy, I've a maye of around 120kg (fluctuating), although an experienced rider, really enjoys knocking around on his 300, albeit a second bike in the garage. They are just so easy to ride. Whatever bike you go on to after that, you'll always have a soft spot for the long stroke single.
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Offline stonelover

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2020, 05:50:27 PM »
I, like Malik, love the thumpers.  That said I think the V7 would be a good starter and keeper. Not so much oomph to get you into trouble, but enough to get you out if the situation arises.

Offline Dave Swanson

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2020, 06:19:46 PM »
I think the Stone is a great beginner bike that you can grow into and not tire of.   Many years ago my first bike was a Honda CB750.   I was just careful with the throttle at first (first week!).  Hey I was 18. 
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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2020, 06:19:46 PM »

Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2020, 06:23:14 PM »
For a beginner, I'd be happier recommending an Enfield single - the 300 & the 500 are similar weights, the riding position is comfortable and the footpegs are a short step to the ground (important when learning), the handing is exceptionally light, and they are by no means intimidating. They are easy to pick up when they go over (you will drop it, it's normal, even after you've got the hang of things), economical to run, fairly cheap to buy, I've a maye of around 120kg (fluctuating), although an experienced rider, really enjoys knocking around on his 300, albeit a second bike in the garage. They are just so easy to ride. Whatever bike you go on to after that, you'll always have a soft spot for the long stroke single.

The Interceptor 650 has a reasonable 473 lbs curb weight, 648cc parallel twin engine and 402 lbs weight capacity.

Royal Enfield quality has a history of being atrocious though. We love them in the U.S., because they're vintage bikes that have recently been reintroduced here, but read and watch online reviews from Indians, where they've been consistently built and sold for many decades, and you'll find overwhelmingly negative comments.

The only advantage that an Interceptor 650 has over a V7 III Stone is price point, but that might be a wash when maintenance and repairs are considered - not to mention the loss of riding time because of it.
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Offline SportsterDoc

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2020, 06:24:53 PM »
My comments, circa Feb 2017, are still valid for V7II:

1. Love the low end torque...and I am already accustomed to H-D Sportsters.
2. Love the 5.8 gallon fuel tank
3. Love the light weight (436#)
4. Love accessibility for checking spark plugs
5. Love  the black powder coated alloy wheels (does not show grime and I really appreciate tubeless tires)
6. Love key access to seat removal (two bolts on Bonneville and one bolt on Sportsters)
7. Love the seat height...not too low...not to high
8. Love the storage under the seat for a small tool bag, spare fuses, spare spark plugs, 6x9 zip lock bag of schematics, etc.
9. Love readability of the gauges...although the numbers could be a tad bigger for 70 year old eyes
10. Love the ground clearance and lean angle capabilities
11. Love the shaft drive
12. Air filter (AP8104924) is inexpensive at $8 - $9
13. Spark plugs (NGK CPR8EB-9) can be ordered from O'Reilly's for $4.49 each
14. Yuasa YTX14-BS battery equivalent is stocked at my local O'Reillys (ETX14), a factory filled AGM for $102.99
15. The 3 relays (headlight on after startup, start and injectors) are the same part number (AP8224462) and are only about $7
16. Appreciate easy access to air filter, fuses and battery, although 3 relays are under the fuel tank
17. Most sensors (and injectors) are easy access (right head temp, oil pressure switch, engine RPM, etc), but some are not (neutral switch, TPS, coils)
18. Seat has been comfortable for up 6 hour days, thus far; whereas both Sportsters and Bonneville seat required upgrades for more than 50 miles.

Negative was fueling issues, which I understand V7III resolved.

How good is the local MG dealer?

Not happy with the one in Las Vegas.   
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Offline Bobic69

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #6 on: August 25, 2020, 06:28:45 PM »
Having owned a V7, I'd say it's a perfect beginner's bike. Relatively low and light with not too much grunt but enough to keep you happy when you're more experienced.
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #7 on: August 25, 2020, 06:39:58 PM »
My comments, circa Feb 2017, are still valid for V7II:

1. Love the low end torque...and I am already accustomed to H-D Sportsters.
2. Love the 5.8 gallon fuel tank
3. Love the light weight (436#)
4. Love accessibility for checking spark plugs
5. Love  the black powder coated alloy wheels (does not show grime and I really appreciate tubeless tires)
6. Love key access to seat removal (two bolts on Bonneville and one bolt on Sportsters)
7. Love the seat height...not too low...not to high
8. Love the storage under the seat for a small tool bag, spare fuses, spare spark plugs, 6x9 zip lock bag of schematics, etc.
9. Love readability of the gauges...although the numbers could be a tad bigger for 70 year old eyes
10. Love the ground clearance and lean angle capabilities
11. Love the shaft drive
12. Air filter (AP8104924) is inexpensive at $8 - $9
13. Spark plugs (NGK CPR8EB-9) can be ordered from O'Reilly's for $4.49 each
14. Yuasa YTX14-BS battery equivalent is stocked at my local O'Reillys (ETX14), a factory filled AGM for $102.99
15. The 3 relays (headlight on after startup, start and injectors) are the same part number (AP8224462) and are only about $7
16. Appreciate easy access to air filter, fuses and battery, although 3 relays are under the fuel tank
17. Most sensors (and injectors) are easy access (right head temp, oil pressure switch, engine RPM, etc), but some are not (neutral switch, TPS, coils)
18. Seat has been comfortable for up 6 hour days, thus far; whereas both Sportsters and Bonneville seat required upgrades for more than 50 miles.

Negative was fueling issues, which I understand V7III resolved.

How good is the local MG dealer?

Not happy with the one in Las Vegas.

The only issue in your post is the question, because there's no Moto Guzzi dealer in the state of Oregon. I would need to purchase the bike from a California dealer and have it shipped. Do these bikes require special mechanics? If so, that kills the option.   :sad:
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 06:56:52 PM by Wild1_OR »
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Offline john fish

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2020, 07:30:47 PM »
I learned on a BMW R100 a long time ago.  It's roughly equivalent to a V7 in weight and size and power.  It's a fine size to learn on.  My first question is: have you sat on one?   Comfort is hugely important.  If it's not comfortable, don't buy it.  If it's comfortable, you'll be fine.

I'd call around about the mechanics.  Ask here, obviously, if anyone is available in your area.  Don't fall for the old "Guzzis are easy to work on.  Do the maintenance yourself."  The fact is: Guzzis are easy to work on but if you don't want to do it, don't do it.  There are lot's of Asian machines out there in the same rough size and weight class and they probably have dealers in your area.
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2020, 07:56:40 PM »
I learned on a BMW R100 a long time ago.  It's roughly equivalent to a V7 in weight and size and power.  It's a fine size to learn on.  My first question is: have you sat on one?   Comfort is hugely important.  If it's not comfortable, don't buy it.  If it's comfortable, you'll be fine.

I'd call around about the mechanics.  Ask here, obviously, if anyone is available in your area.  Don't fall for the old "Guzzis are easy to work on.  Do the maintenance yourself."  The fact is: Guzzis are easy to work on but if you don't want to do it, don't do it.  There are lot's of Asian machines out there in the same rough size and weight class and they probably have dealers in your area.

Being that there are no dealers here, I'll search for someone selling a used one, so that I can learn how it feels to sit on one.

Unfortunately, most Asian standard bikes have a modern (futuristic) appearance. The few classically styled ones, such as the Kawasaki W800, don't equal the the V7's specifications.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 07:57:28 PM by Wild1_OR »
2018 V7 III Stone Azzurro Elettrico

Online LongRanger

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #10 on: August 25, 2020, 08:45:51 PM »
Hey Doc, great to hear from you again, albeit on the “other side.”

My V7C had a very sensitive rear brake and was prone to locking. Not sure if this was resolved on later generations, but that would be my only caveat in recommending a V7 for a new rider. Otherwise, it’s a very mild and agile bike, but it’ll move out when you need to.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2020, 08:46:59 PM by LongRanger »
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Online Kiwi_Roy

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #11 on: August 25, 2020, 08:56:07 PM »
Having owned a V7, I'd say it's a perfect beginner's bike. Relatively low and light with not too much grunt but enough to keep you happy when you're more experienced.

Hey, I represent that LOL
My V7III is my first and last new bike, I love the great range and light weight, I have 17,000 km on the clock in my first year of ownership.
I wouldn't hesitate to ride this across the country, plenty fast and lots of power, I can still remember when a 750 was a BIG bike
I'm coming down from an 1100 Griso.
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #12 on: August 25, 2020, 09:42:29 PM »
For a beginner, I'd be happier recommending an Enfield single - the 300 & the 500 are similar weights, the riding position is comfortable and the footpegs are a short step to the ground (important when learning), the handing is exceptionally light, and they are by no means intimidating. They are easy to pick up when they go over (you will drop it, it's normal, even after you've got the hang of things), economical to run, fairly cheap to buy, I've a maye of around 120kg (fluctuating), although an experienced rider, really enjoys knocking around on his 300, albeit a second bike in the garage. They are just so easy to ride. Whatever bike you go on to after that, you'll always have a soft spot for the long stroke single.

As a follow up, I've learned that Royal Enfield offers a 3 year warranty with unlimited mileage and roadside assistance. It seems they're attempting to win consumer confidence.
2018 V7 III Stone Azzurro Elettrico

Offline trippah

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #13 on: August 25, 2020, 09:53:27 PM »
another great thumper is the Suzuki Savage (S-60) which is easy to ride, wont go too fast and is a bit heavier making it stable for a heavier rider.  Otherwise the RE Bullet would be a good choice..as well as the V7 I suspect.  Get proper training,,too many people not paying attention on the road these days.

Offline john fish

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #14 on: August 25, 2020, 09:53:46 PM »

Unfortunately, most Asian standard bikes have a modern (futuristic) appearance. The few classically styled ones, such as the Kawasaki W800, don't equal the the V7's specifications.

Truthyness there.  Aesthetically, some of those Asian bikes are, um, unfortunate looking.  I hope someone is close and will let you try one.  Here's a site to check ergos:

https://cycle-ergo.com/
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #15 on: August 25, 2020, 09:56:26 PM »
another great thumper is the Suzuki Savage (S-60) which is easy to ride, wont go too fast and is a bit heavier making it stable for a heavier rider.  Otherwise the RE Bullet would be a good choice..as well as the V7 I suspect.  Get proper training,,too many people not paying attention on the road these days.

I suspect it was safer to ride in the "old days", when idiots weren't behind the wheel of a car while staring at a cellphone.
2018 V7 III Stone Azzurro Elettrico

Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #16 on: August 25, 2020, 09:57:35 PM »
Truthyness there.  Aesthetically, some of those Asian bikes are, um, unfortunate looking.  I hope someone is close and will let you try one.  Here's a site to check ergos:

https://cycle-ergo.com/

Great site. Thanks!
2018 V7 III Stone Azzurro Elettrico

Offline s1120

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #17 on: August 26, 2020, 06:13:01 AM »
If your a large person, I can see a V7 being a great first, and longer bike. It has good power so you will grow into it, but it is not peaky, and hard hitting like a lot of the asian bikes. Big enough that you fit, but not so big that it over powers you. Standard platform makes it easy to handle, and balance. I think its a good choice. Other then the lack of dealers that was brought up...   
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Offline usedtobefast

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #18 on: August 26, 2020, 10:16:19 AM »
Ok, I'll be the odd person here and recommend a Suzuki SV-650, 2017 or newer. 

Reasons for a SV-650: Way more dealers, better suspension and brakes, better resale value if you decide you don't like riding or decide to move to a bigger/faster bike in the future, nothing quirky or odd about it, ridiculously reliable, does everything well, has no real issues, can usually fine a decent clean used one, can also find great discounts on new ones.

If you are mechanically inclined, like you replace your car/truck alternator, a Guzzi is very easy to take care of.  But ... all sorts of quirky things.  Like a sticker on the bike and the service manual lists different valve clearance specs.  The service manual, on the same page, list two different ways on checking the oil level (one place says screw in the dipstick, 1/3 page lower it says not to) ... also says to drive it 10 miles before checking the oil level vs. the Suzuki's sight glass (so 3 seconds to do a check).  Oil quantity ... put in the amount listed in the service manual and that is too much.  Transmission oil level listed as too much (probably because there is some residual left in there when changing?).  1/2 plastic & 1/2 metal fuel filter in tank.  Get the clutch cable adjustment wrong and you kill your throwout bearing.  Suspension is very basic.  And more.

So if you like machinery and paying attention to it and caring for it, a Moto Guzzi can be a wonderful thing. 

But if you just want to add gas, press start button, and go, the SV-650 has zero quirks.

Also, you might want to check out the V-Strom 650.  It sits a bit taller, has more seat/peg/ground room.  But is is like 70lbs heavier and around $1000 more expensive.


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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #19 on: August 26, 2020, 11:37:35 AM »
I’m with Mr. Fish. Some bikes just make my eyes hurt.Get something beautiful.

Offline OldMojo

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #20 on: August 26, 2020, 01:02:54 PM »
I’m with Mr. Fish. Some bikes just make my eyes hurt.Get something beautiful.

This.

If you're not tempted to keep glancing back at it as you walk away from the parking lot, you have the wrong bike.

Don't know if I would recommend a bike with cafe ergos as a first bike. Comfort is a large component of confidence.

I would think that a Triumph Speedmaster from a few years back might be a good starter bike for a bigger fella. Never having ridden one, I'll rely on others to confirm or refute this.

Can't say that I would recommend a new bike for a beginner. Get something cheap enough that you can pay cash for, used enough that you can drop without remorse, but new enough that you can easily get parts when you do bend something.
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Offline TimmyTheHog

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #21 on: August 26, 2020, 01:58:32 PM »
Although V7 wasn't my first motorcycle, it is the first one I had to do a lot of things with.

It is light, large fuel tank, friendly seat height, nimble thru town, minimal maintenance (did had some gremlins), super comfy on the highway.

Also it is one of the few nowadays actually still LOOKS like a motorcycle and not a spaceship.

Only sold it for a more dirt-orientated tourer and tbh, lack of dealer support.

Without repeating much of what other said, yes, it is a great beginner bike, and would had been my long term bike if weren't because i like dirt more now :P
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #22 on: August 26, 2020, 04:46:53 PM »
Ok, I'll be the odd person here and recommend a Suzuki SV-650, 2017 or newer. 

Reasons for a SV-650: Way more dealers, better suspension and brakes, better resale value if you decide you don't like riding or decide to move to a bigger/faster bike in the future, nothing quirky or odd about it, ridiculously reliable, does everything well, has no real issues, can usually fine a decent clean used one, can also find great discounts on new ones.

If you are mechanically inclined, like you replace your car/truck alternator, a Guzzi is very easy to take care of.  But ... all sorts of quirky things.  Like a sticker on the bike and the service manual lists different valve clearance specs.  The service manual, on the same page, list two different ways on checking the oil level (one place says screw in the dipstick, 1/3 page lower it says not to) ... also says to drive it 10 miles before checking the oil level vs. the Suzuki's sight glass (so 3 seconds to do a check).  Oil quantity ... put in the amount listed in the service manual and that is too much.  Transmission oil level listed as too much (probably because there is some residual left in there when changing?).  1/2 plastic & 1/2 metal fuel filter in tank.  Get the clutch cable adjustment wrong and you kill your throwout bearing.  Suspension is very basic.  And more.

So if you like machinery and paying attention to it and caring for it, a Moto Guzzi can be a wonderful thing. 

But if you just want to add gas, press start button, and go, the SV-650 has zero quirks.

Also, you might want to check out the V-Strom 650.  It sits a bit taller, has more seat/peg/ground room.  But is is like 70lbs heavier and around $1000 more expensive.

I genuinely appreciate your advice, but the bikes you're suggesting aren't anywhere near the type that interest me. I seek something with a classic style.
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Offline SportsterDoc

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #23 on: August 26, 2020, 06:12:15 PM »
No special mechanics involved.
Changing fluid on engine,  transmission and final drive is not complicated.
Valve checking or ajustment is very, very easy access.

Local dealership sales, parts and service brought no complaints. It was the owner with whom I had words...as I did not appreciate him moving my bike so that he could park his Jaguar in the space where I was parked. He was apologetic at the time, but later his true personality showed through... probably embarrassed him in front of his employees.

in 2012 I bought a Triumph in Simi Valley California while I lived in Las Vegas and there was no dealership at that time in southern Nevada. It was never an issue. The size of the rear tire was not common so I bought a spare and kept it in the garage.

These days it's very simple to order parts online.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2020, 06:13:15 PM by SportsterDoc »
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Offline SportsterDoc

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #24 on: August 26, 2020, 06:30:55 PM »
Hey Doc, great to hear from you again, albeit on the “other side.”

My V7C had a very sensitive rear brake and was prone to locking. Not sure if this was resolved on later generations, but that would be my only caveat in recommending a V7 for a new rider. Otherwise, it’s a very mild and agile bike, but it’ll move out when you need to.

Well stated.
Although the V7II and III are now anti-lock brakes.
"See" you back on the CB 1100 forum.
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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #25 on: August 26, 2020, 08:35:08 PM »
Wild1_OR -- I understood you say you are a beginner without a motorcycle.  If I understood you correctly, you have the wrong starting point.  Here is the correct starting point: http://team-oregon.org/endorsement/eintermediate/

Because you are a quite a large individual with all that implies, for your own safety you must continue your training with http://team-oregon.org/advanced/

As a minimum, I recommend the Riders Skills Practice and the Precision Maneuvering courses.

When I took my Mustang open-tracking (you have some nice courses in OR) my instructors told me the best investment was not in my car but my track time.  They were right and I was always the last off the course.

After you've completed your courses you will not only be a safer (to you and others) rider but you will be closer to making a decision on your ride.

Best wishes.  Send pictures.

Online Kiwi_Roy

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #26 on: August 26, 2020, 08:50:37 PM »
Why is it whenever anyone asks for advice on a beginner bike everyone tries to steer them to anything else but a Guzzi.
A V7 or Breva small block is a perfect beginners bike, great brakes, reliable inexpensive and something you can keep
Plus which it comes with this forum, that alone is a good reason to recommend it.
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Offline SmithSwede

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #27 on: August 26, 2020, 11:24:35 PM »
I think a V7 small block is about the perfect “beginner bike.”   

Mild enough to learn on.  But so capable that you may never “outgrow” it.   

Heck, even if you think you outgrew it, you may find yourself downsizing and returning to the same recipe 10 years later. 
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Online Muzz

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2020, 03:02:54 AM »
I think a V7 small block is about the perfect “beginner bike.”   

Mild enough to learn on.  But so capable that you may never “outgrow” it.   

Heck, even if you think you outgrew it, you may find yourself downsizing and returning to the same recipe 10 years later.

Prescott here has summed it up perfectly.

I still have my Breva from 16 years ago, these were the first generation of the one you are considering.  One thing I do like about it is that it doesn't have a power band as such, just gets a bit busier at about 5000 rpm.  In other words, the smooth even power delivery is far less likely to get you in to trouble than a bike that turns in to a wailing banshee when you least expect it.  Having said that, they are a very capable bike that will tour just as easily as it will tootle around town.

You mention servicing.  The Guzzi engine is a very basic design and is very easy to service and work on generally.  Most here on WildGuzzi do their own servicing, and I have lost count of the number of new riders who learnt to mechanic on their Guzzi simply because the dearships tend to be a bit sparse.  Plenty of assistance is available here from some very knowledgeable people.
Muzz. Cristchurch, New Zealand
03 Breva

Life is just a bowl of Allbran
Ya wake up in the morning and it's there

Offline SteveRivet

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2020, 08:02:31 AM »
Hello, I'm a beginner rider and quite a large Individual. It's for this reason that a sub-300cc first motorcycle isn't an option. I'm attempting to find a balance between a lighter weight bike with a conservative cylinder capacity and a bike that's big enough to adequately and safely support me.

I've done extensive research and when compared on a spreadsheet with other makes/models with similar specifications, I found that the V7 III Stone might best check the boxes, with its 461 lbs curb weight, 744cc engine, 463 lbs weight capacity and upright seating position.

I wish to ask the forum if it might be too much bike for a beginner though? I admit that I'm feeling sorta intimidated. Thank you.

As a former MSF Instructor, I think a V7 would be perfect, especially if you're a big guy.  Power delivery is smooth and won't overwhelm, and unlike a smaller bike will have enough power to help a big guy get out of the way if needed.  Ergonomics are neutral - which is a good thing - and maint is easy, especially with no chain to deal with.  Decent aftermarket to tailor to your needs.  Wholeheartedly recommend.

-Steve
2014 R1200GS

Previously:  1999 Bassa, 1972 Eldorado, 1986 Lemans IV, 2008 1200 Sport, 2011 Stelvio


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