Author Topic: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?  (Read 7281 times)

Offline alanp

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2020, 09:59:21 AM »
Just a few more comments re what others have posted;

Rear brake locking up on a V7C;  maybe, but not an issue on a V7II or III, which are the models you want.  The C is about 10 years old now.  Newer bikes have ABS.
Poor fueling; not an issue on the III, but maybe the II.  However, a Beetle map is desirable for either bike and completely solves all fueling issues.  Installing the maps is easy, and as with most things you may need to do on a V7, there is a wealth of information available on here and from the great members.
 
I think this is the best motorcycle forum in existence for getting help with your bike.  I have had Suzuki's, Yamahas, Triumphs, and BMWs and have never found the quality or rapidity of help solving problems that you can get on this site.  So while I understand the concern over a lack of dealer support, I think that is largely overcome by the fact that these ARE about the easiest modern bikes to service and maintain and you have this site to back you up.  My V7II has 15,000 miles and I have never needed a dealer for anything but tire changes so far.  Another good thing IMHO is that if you aren't particularly mechanically inclined (like me), The V7's are about the best modern bikes you can have.  I have learned so much from owning a V7 and other older similar Guzzis, because when I have needed to fix something it is usually very approachable and even I, with the help of this site, can figure it out. 
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Offline SportsterDoc

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #31 on: August 27, 2020, 10:31:25 AM »
V7, V7II, V7III are classic naked basic M/C.
No tupperware...just a few annoying stickers to remove.



« Last Edit: August 27, 2020, 10:32:57 AM by SportsterDoc »
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Offline Tkelly

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #32 on: August 28, 2020, 03:13:41 PM »
My wife is selling her 2013 v7 special in yellow and black.We are in S W  Wisconsin.Bike has everything fixed for comfort and performance.Call Deb if interested 608 574 7880.

Offline Bulldog9

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2020, 03:15:54 PM »
IMHO, a sub $2000 beater you won't care when you drop is best for a 'first bike', though as others have said, the V7 is a fantastic beginners bike you can grow into.
« Last Edit: August 28, 2020, 03:18:04 PM by Bulldog9 »
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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #33 on: August 28, 2020, 03:15:54 PM »

Offline Guzzi Gal

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #34 on: August 28, 2020, 04:10:48 PM »
Wild1_OR, you've come to the right place!!!

A V7 III is absolutely a good beginners bike!  For my first motorcycle, I gifted myself a 2017 V7 III Aniversario for my 50th birthday, sight unseen.  I sat on a Special and a Stone before making my decision to buy but I'd never ridden one.  I did a ton of research and decided to purchase one from Moto International in Washington State (now closed) and have 'er shipped.  My thinking was that "Ani" would be my one and done forever bike.  I've not regretted that decision.   

My previous experience was limited to an hour learning to ride my high school BFs Honda on an old runway back in the mid-80s and tooling around on my aunts 60s Lambretta scooter.  I didn't really get around to properly learning until after a 35-year hiatus when my husband surprised me with a matching set of little Honda Metropolitans for our 30th anniversary.  We signed up for the MSF course bought all the ATGATT and the rest is history.

My ergo's are as follows:

5'5"
135 lbs
31" inseam
Old lady strength (none)

I can pretty much put my bare feet flat, and if I wear a boot with a 1" heel, all is well.  Weight is something to consider if you're on the smaller side, as once they start to tip, there's no stopping them if they outweigh you by several hundred pounds.  That said, If I can pick mine, you should be able to pick up yours.

   
:bow: Thanks for enabling my MG obsession! :bow:
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #35 on: August 28, 2020, 08:37:30 PM »
Wild1_OR -- I understood you say you are a beginner without a motorcycle.  If I understood you correctly, you have the wrong starting point.  Here is the correct starting point: http://team-oregon.org/endorsement/eintermediate/

Because you are a quite a large individual with all that implies, for your own safety you must continue your training with http://team-oregon.org/advanced/

As a minimum, I recommend the Riders Skills Practice and the Precision Maneuvering courses.

When I took my Mustang open-tracking (you have some nice courses in OR) my instructors told me the best investment was not in my car but my track time.  They were right and I was always the last off the course.

After you've completed your courses you will not only be a safer (to you and others) rider but you will be closer to making a decision on your ride.

Best wishes.  Send pictures.

Yes, I already checked them out and will be taking the beginner course. It's booked through October, but I'm not in a rush.  :thumb:
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Offline keener

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #36 on: August 28, 2020, 10:14:38 PM »
All of the V7 bikes are beginner bikes ...go for it and you may end up just keeping it. :cheesy:
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Offline antmanbee

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #37 on: August 29, 2020, 07:47:26 AM »
Wild1,

I see that you asked a similar question on the Suzuki Savage forum.
My perspective from owning both an S40 and a 750 Breva (pretty much the same as a V7 first gen but with different bodywork)
is that they are both pretty good bikes to begin on that you can still enjoy and be satisfied with after your learning curve.
I would tend to lean towards the 750 Guzzi cosidering that you are a big guy.
You probably could find a good Breva 750 or an S40 for around $2k.
The S40 is probably cheaper to own long term as there are a lot of them around and used parts are plentiful.
Both the Guzzi and the S40 are pretty durable and trouble free.
The S40 and the V7 have considerably different ergonomics. I prefer the Guzzi ergonomics because I feel bore balanced with my feet under me (not forward)
and a slight lean forward to the bars.
Both are a lot of fun.
Whenever I ride either the S40 or the Breva I say to myself, I would be happy and satisfied with this if it was my only bike.

Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #38 on: August 29, 2020, 12:45:56 PM »
Wild1,

I see that you asked a similar question on the Suzuki Savage forum.
My perspective from owning both an S40 and a 750 Breva (pretty much the same as a V7 first gen but with different bodywork)
is that they are both pretty good bikes to begin on that you can still enjoy and be satisfied with after your learning curve.
I would tend to lean towards the 750 Guzzi cosidering that you are a big guy.
You probably could find a good Breva 750 or an S40 for around $2k.
The S40 is probably cheaper to own long term as there are a lot of them around and used parts are plentiful.
Both the Guzzi and the S40 are pretty durable and trouble free.
The S40 and the V7 have considerably different ergonomics. I prefer the Guzzi ergonomics because I feel bore balanced with my feet under me (not forward)
and a slight lean forward to the bars.
Both are a lot of fun.
Whenever I ride either the S40 or the Breva I say to myself, I would be happy and satisfied with this if it was my only bike.

Yes, I want a classically styled motorcycle, which to me meant a cruiser. Therefore, I initially had my heart set on either an S40 or Rebel 500, as a beginner bike. Through this journey, I read that cruisers may not be ideal for beginners, due to the raked forks, forward pegs and relaxed seating positions, which may make them challenging to control in abrupt situations.
While that didn't disqualify them, I then discovered retro standard bikes, such as the Yamaha SR400, Kawasaki W800 and Royal Enfield Interceptor 650. My perception of Triumph and Moto Guzzi, was always that they're expensive bikes with larger engines - basically, the European equivalents of Harley-Davidson.
Then, I stumbled upon the V7 III, which changed that perception. I believe it's a beautifully crafted Italian retro standard bike that won't break the bank. All of the bikes I've mentioned here were on my list at some point and two, maybe three of them, are still on it.
I've learned a lot these past two months about makes, models, types and motorcycles in general. It's a great experience and each day brings me closer to choosing and then finding the one.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2020, 12:49:08 PM by Wild1_OR »
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Online Kev m

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #39 on: August 29, 2020, 01:27:01 PM »
Yes, I want a classically styled motorcycle, which to me meant a cruiser. Therefore, I initially had my heart set on either an S40 or Rebel 500, as a beginner bike. Through this journey, I read that cruisers may not be ideal for beginners, due to the raked forks, forward pegs and relaxed seating positions, which may make them challenging to control in abrupt situations.


Though more or less true in comparison to other designs someone wholly oversold you on the significance, especially when it comes to the bikes you mentioned. I doubt the average rider would even know the difference nevermind the beginner.

Look I whole-heartedly think a V7 could be a great bike for a beginner. I wouldn't look twice at an S40, but that's taste. I'd sooner take a Rebel of those two. That said there's nothing about handling and capability that should matter between the three to a beginner.

If I were to say anything I would also suggest you consider a used 883 Sporty. Cheap to buy and maintain, simple, forgiving and can take a beating and carry a big guy.
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Offline Moparnut72

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #40 on: August 29, 2020, 01:48:59 PM »
I had to lookup to see what an S40 is. Nope, you will outgrow that thing in a heartbeat. My choices would a Royal Enfield 650, 883 Sportster and a V7. I would eliminate the Enfield due to chain drive. That leaves the Sporty and the Guzzi. Both of these would make excellent first bikes that could be kept and used for a lifetime. I just got a V7 to augment my big Guzzi Audace for around town and short jaunts in the twisties. At some point it will become my main ride as I get too old and feeble to handle the Audace. It will do just fine for touring as well. The Sporty is another good choice. Bullet proof, belt drive which can be changed without tearing half of the bike apart. In my opinion the best bike Harley builds and unfortunately is on the critical list. The one negative is that the Sporty weighs roughly 100 lbs more than the V7. I would choose the V7 but I am kinda biased although I had a Sporty for a couple of years and liked it too.
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Offline stonelover

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #41 on: August 29, 2020, 02:14:20 PM »
I chose my 2016 Stone II over the S40 because I didn't want forward pegs. Very satisfied.

Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #42 on: August 29, 2020, 02:18:38 PM »
Though more or less true in comparison to other designs someone wholly oversold you on the significance, especially when it comes to the bikes you mentioned. I doubt the average rider would even know the difference nevermind the beginner.

Look I whole-heartedly think a V7 could be a great bike for a beginner. I wouldn't look twice at an S40, but that's taste. I'd sooner take a Rebel of those two. That said there's nothing about handling and capability that should matter between the three to a beginner.

If I were to say anything I would also suggest you consider a used 883 Sporty. Cheap to buy and maintain, simple, forgiving and can take a beating and carry a big guy.

Your information is helpful. I wish to keep the wet weight of the bike under 500 lbs. The only HD that comes close to that weight is the Street 500 and it's 65 lbs heavier than the V7 III.
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Online Kev m

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #43 on: August 29, 2020, 02:26:48 PM »
Your information is helpful. I wish to keep the wet weight of the bike under 500 lbs. The only HD that comes close to that weight is the Street 500 and it's 65 lbs heavier than the V7 III.

Your bike, your call.

That said weight is a funny thing.

Back when I had an EVO RK in the garage next to a Oilhead BMW (RS) the 700#  King felt lighter than the over 100# actually lighter RS.

Similarly our 07 XL1200Lr at nearly 600# felt lighter than our low-500s# Guzzi Breva 1100.

In both cases the heavier but lower center of gravity bikes hid the weight when compared to taller but lighter bikes.

Hell my athletic/strong, but diminutive wife had more trouble with her R65 Airhead then her first Harley 883L for that same reason.
« Last Edit: August 29, 2020, 02:28:15 PM by Kev m »
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #44 on: August 29, 2020, 03:24:31 PM »
Poor fueling; not an issue on the III, but maybe the II.  However, a Beetle map is desirable for either bike and completely solves all fueling issues.  Installing the maps is easy, and as with most things you may need to do on a V7, there is a wealth of information available on here and from the great members.

I was reading through threads, saw references to a map and it reminded me of your suggestion. I don't want to sidetrack this thread, but will you share a brief summary of a Beetle map?
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Offline Moparnut72

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #45 on: August 29, 2020, 03:35:43 PM »
For a V7lll you won't need a Beetle map. Mine fuels perfectly through the whole range. My Audace not so much. I had to make modifications.
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Offline Muzz

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #46 on: August 29, 2020, 04:38:25 PM »
For a V7lll you won't need a Beetle map. Mine fuels perfectly through the whole range. My Audace not so much. I had to make modifications.
kk

Same for the Breva.  I also gather you can't do anything much with the Breva map anyway. (Not that it needs it; it's about spot on anyway)
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Offline malik

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #47 on: August 29, 2020, 06:55:47 PM »
For a V7lll you won't need a Beetle map. Mine fuels perfectly through the whole range. My Audace not so much. I had to make modifications.
kk

Briefly, a map is the instructions to the computer in the ECU controlling the air, fuel & spark in response to the various inputs. If a map is well written from the factory (like the Breva & the V7 Classic), then there is no issue, and can mostly be ignored. The single throttle body V7's & the V7 II were given a new ECU which was not quite so robust, hence the interest in after market maps. Some other guzzi models did not tolerate changes of mufflers well either, as well as other issues, and some clever people found out what was inside the ECU's instructions and made it freely available to the world. The small dealer base & the tools & training available (or lack of same) from Guzzi may have had something to do with the popularity of aftermarket tools as well.
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Online Kev m

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #48 on: August 29, 2020, 07:11:28 PM »
Briefly, a map is the instructions to the computer in the ECU controlling the air, fuel & spark in response to the various inputs. If a map is well written from the factory (like the Breva & the V7 Classic), then there is no issue, and can mostly be ignored. The single throttle body V7's & the V7 II were given a new ECU which was not quite so robust, hence the interest in after market maps. Some other guzzi models did not tolerate changes of mufflers well either, as well as other issues, and some clever people found out what was inside the ECU's instructions and made it freely available to the world. The small dealer base & the tools & training available (or lack of same) from Guzzi may have had something to do with the popularity of aftermarket tools as well.

Point of order, it's not the "robustness" of the latter maps that's the issue it's the complexity combined with the unintended consequences of meeting emissions standards at certain points and the attempts to balance that with optimal performance.

I tend to retain stock mapping on my bikes even if I know there are potentially some RCHs of performance to gain from abandoning them and shutting off the O2 sensors.

Is there A NEED for a new map, NO.

ARE there benefits to it, sure.
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Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #49 on: August 29, 2020, 07:12:50 PM »
Briefly, a map is the instructions to the computer in the ECU controlling the air, fuel & spark in response to the various inputs. If a map is well written from the factory (like the Breva & the V7 Classic), then there is no issue, and can mostly be ignored. The single throttle body V7's & the V7 II were given a new ECU which was not quite so robust, hence the interest in after market maps. Some other guzzi models did not tolerate changes of mufflers well either, as well as other issues, and some clever people found out what was inside the ECU's instructions and made it freely available to the world. The small dealer base & the tools & training available (or lack of same) from Guzzi may have had something to do with the popularity of aftermarket tools as well.
Point of order, it's not the "robustness" of the latter maps that's the issue it's the complexity combined with the unintended consequences of meeting emissions standards at certain points and the attempts to balance that with optimal performance.

I tend to retain stock mapping on my bikes even if I know there are potentially some RCHs of performance to gain from abandoning them and shutting off the O2 sensors.

Is there A NEED for a new map, NO.

ARE there benefits to it, sure.

Thanks for the informative summary.  :thumb:
« Last Edit: August 29, 2020, 07:13:31 PM by Wild1_OR »
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Offline bad Chad

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #50 on: August 29, 2020, 07:21:54 PM »
My wife is selling her 2013 v7 special in yellow and black.We are in S W  Wisconsin.Bike has everything fixed for comfort and performance.Call Deb if interested 608 574 7880.

I can vouch for this bike and owner.   Immaculate, and cared for like your moms life depended on it!  It looks fantastic!
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Offline GeorgiaGuzzi

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #51 on: August 29, 2020, 08:02:10 PM »
To the OP, as someone who is both tall AND fat, let me assure you that you will look silly on a S40. I love the bikes, they’re awesome, and there’s a tasty cafe conversion. However, I’m modestly 6’1” and a solid 300 lbs. When I’m skinny I’m around 275. Anyways, cruiser style bikes with a narrow silhouette (like s40, 883, rebel) tend to highlight girth, and if your taller you’re cramped on them. Standards like you have mentioned generally have a taller seat height which lessens the effect of “its a gorilla on a tricycle”! Just my opinion fwiw. Check the Royal Enfield Himalayan in addition to the V7.

Oh and this forum is among the best anywhere. If you get a V7 you WILL have plenty of online help!

Offline Wild1_OR

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #52 on: August 29, 2020, 08:06:35 PM »
To the OP, as someone who is both tall AND fat, let me assure you that you will look silly on a S40. I love the bikes, they’re awesome, and there’s a tasty cafe conversion. However, I’m modestly 6’1” and a solid 300 lbs. When I’m skinny I’m around 275. Anyways, cruiser style bikes with a narrow silhouette (like s40, 883, rebel) tend to highlight girth, and if your taller you’re cramped on them. Standards like you have mentioned generally have a taller seat height which lessens the effect of “its a gorilla on a tricycle”! Just my opinion fwiw. Check the Royal Enfield Himalayan in addition to the V7.

Oh and this forum is among the best anywhere. If you get a V7 you WILL have plenty of online help!

This is awesome advice! It was a concern that I hadn't voiced, because I was sorta self-conscious about it.  :embarrassed:  Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!
« Last Edit: August 29, 2020, 08:07:48 PM by Wild1_OR »
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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #53 on: August 29, 2020, 08:23:30 PM »
This is awesome advice! It was a concern that I hadn't voiced, because I was sorta self-conscious about it.  :embarrassed:  Thank you, thank you, thank you!!!

Meh, I mean I'm "only" 5'10" and uh 225-240 depending on uh lunch.

But I look MORE like a monkey humping a football on my V7s than I did on our Sportsters.

Not that I would let that stop me from loving and riding our V7s.

I haven't figured out how to link and post photos from my phone or I'd at least post one on the V7.

Trust me when I say my last Sportster was bigger.
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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #54 on: August 29, 2020, 08:29:32 PM »
Kev m -- you know I'm admirer of your Photoshop work.  But you've ruined all that because I can't unsee your image of a monkey humping a football. :blank:

Offline GeorgiaGuzzi

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #55 on: August 29, 2020, 09:30:15 PM »
Meh, I mean I'm "only" 5'10" and uh 225-240 depending on uh lunch.

But I look MORE like a monkey humping a football on my V7s than I did on our Sportsters.

Not that I would let that stop me from loving and riding our V7s.

I haven't figured out how to link and post photos from my phone or I'd at least post one on the V7.

Trust me when I say my last Sportster was bigger.

Maybe something like an xr sporty. However, most 883’s have a narrow, low silhouette. Kinda like a 48. And when I’m on a sporty I look kinda silly. I’ve never rode a V7, there’s a reason I got my Quota and also am a fan of stelvio’s and Norges.

However, why would you want to saddle a new rider with the hassle of having to learn to put up with all the Harley bro’s telling him he needs to get a “real” Harley? Or every time he goes to the dealer they try to talk him into a big twin? Or the whole “lifestyle” image that goes with Harley ownership? Tbh, I wouldn’t recommend a Harley to a new rider because most Harley riders aren’t riders. They’re weekend posers who want to ride 15 miles to their local bar and talk about how loud pipes save lives. Now you and I know that Harley makes some good bikes, and the sporty, even an 883, set up correctly, is great even for someone my size. Sportsters don’t get their proper respect and a Sporty rider will have to mentally give the middle finger to most other Harley riders. that’s something a new rider has to learn thru experience imho.  But that is just my opinion, so it’s not worth much cept to me! 😎

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #56 on: August 29, 2020, 10:24:39 PM »
Ok well how you "look' on a bike? That's important? Meh. There's a reason my wife closes her eyes when we have sex.

Posers who want you to ride "something else" are all the same be it a Harley big twin or something from JAPanInc. or BMW or, gasp, Guzzi.

Although I've taken some delight in the form of the bikes I've chosen it's never really been important if others shared that delight. I mean shit I can't please everyone (I have trouble enough pleasing aforementioned wife and kids), so really when I choose a bike it's all about selfish old me.
« Last Edit: August 30, 2020, 07:20:06 AM by Kev m »
Current Fleet

18 Guzzi V7III Carbon Dark
16 HD FLHP
13 Guzzi V7 Stone
11 Duc M696

Offline Muzz

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  • Location: Christchurch, New Zealand
Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #57 on: August 31, 2020, 04:25:37 AM »

But I look MORE like a monkey humping a football on my V7s than I did on our Sportsters.

I think that is politely called "information overload" Kev!  :gotpics: :grin:
Muzz. Cristchurch, New Zealand
03 Breva

Life is just a bowl of Allbran
Ya wake up in the morning and it's there

Offline john fish

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Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #58 on: August 31, 2020, 06:13:43 AM »
This is awesome advice! It was a concern that I hadn't voiced, because I was sorta self-conscious about it.  :embarrassed: 

That's understandable, human, and normal.  You're just one of the few people honest enough to admit it. 

You've filtered through an enormous number of bikes and found a reasonable choice.  Good work. 
He lost the run of himself.

Offline Blaufeld66

  • Sunday Rider
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  • Posts: 159
  • Location: Grosseto, Tuscany - Italy
Re: V7 III Stone for a Beginner?
« Reply #59 on: September 01, 2020, 08:48:29 AM »
I tend to retain stock mapping on my bikes even if I know there are potentially some RCHs of performance to gain from abandoning them and shutting off the O2 sensors.

In the USA, are there any periodical revisions to a vehicle?
Here, you must do the first after 5 years of construction, then every 2 years.
If there is anything modified (as emissions, tire sizes, signals, exhausts and light system) that is not within original specs, you are passable of a fine if stopped and, more importantly, insurance doesn' cover you or damages done by you.
Sold:
1984 V65C
1985 850-T5
2001 V11 Sport Rosso Mandello Edition
2008 Stelvio 1200 4V
Own:
2003 California EV


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