Author Topic: Bacon Slicer project  (Read 79571 times)

twowings

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #330 on: February 17, 2019, 08:32:04 AM »
Simple = elegant  :thumb:

Nice work!  :bow:

Offline Furbo

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #331 on: March 02, 2019, 10:01:30 AM »
That is sweet. :thumb:

Spent 20+ yrs in N. Italy. Would see the old timers most summer weekends.  It was very common to see Del VHB square slide carbs grafted on in place of the originals btw.
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Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #332 on: March 04, 2019, 11:26:39 PM »
That is sweet. :thumb:

Spent 20+ yrs in N. Italy. Would see the old timers most summer weekends.  It was very common to see Del VHB square slide carbs grafted on in place of the originals btw.

Cool!  that's a big reason I decided to get this bike - saw a bunch of funky old Guzzis out and about when visiting Italy.  Thanks for the VHB info - it may get to that.

Latest is to replace the friction material in the parallelogram forks.  3/16" machinable Garolite sheet from McMaster-Carr.

         


1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #333 on: May 04, 2019, 12:02:19 PM »
Gift from my brother - 6V LED headlight bulb for old Guzzi!  Same as Bosch apparently.  Much brighter and an a slightly irritating green that may be more noticable to distracted drivers.


   
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #333 on: May 04, 2019, 12:02:19 PM »

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #334 on: May 04, 2019, 08:29:56 PM »
Gift from my brother - 6V LED headlight bulb for old Guzzi!  Same as Bosch apparently.  Much brighter and an a slightly irritating green that may be more noticable to distracted drivers.


   


 :thumb: Vech at Bench Mark Works is selling that bulb now. Looks like a good product for lots of older 6 volt motorcycles.
Charlie

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #335 on: May 05, 2019, 12:30:17 AM »
Got a box of parts from Italy.   :grin:    (including some coil springs for my buddy's Airone)





The fun and easy part... (normally wouldn't be buying these, but the eyes were ovaled, shoulders worn off, and chrome was polished away)


   
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #336 on: May 05, 2019, 12:32:12 AM »
:thumb: Vech at Bench Mark Works is selling that bulb now. Looks like a good product for lots of older 6 volt motorcycles.

 Good to know!  :thumb:

Bench Mark Works is a good resource for stoff that crosses over between Guzzis and BMWs.
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

canuck750

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #337 on: May 05, 2019, 10:22:59 AM »
Got a box of parts from Italy.   :grin:    (including some coil springs for my buddy's Airone)





The fun and easy part... (normally wouldn't be buying these, but the eyes were ovaled, shoulders worn off, and chrome was polished away)


   


The new dampers look fantastic. :thumb:

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #338 on: May 05, 2019, 02:23:25 PM »
The mag rewind really improved the way the bike starts and runs, but sometimes still popped out the carb as the throttle started to lift - especially cold.  This is a classic symptom of too much cut-away in the slide.  I could buy a new slide at $40 or so and guess how much cut-away was needed, OR I could grind what was needed off the bottom for free (Guzzi content  :laugh:) using the old Black and Decker valve grinder.  Take 1 mm off the bottom of the slide and it no longer pops through the carb.   :grin:





The parts order brought new points and rubbing block for the magneto, and the correct advance spring.  After a month or two of short trips the ignition timing seemed to have slipped so it was time to replace some parts.
Spring was easy:

   


Points were a little more work - but all my fault.  Marelli makes it easy (compared to Lucas face cams) - the points plate comes off and do the work on the bench.  Old points copper connector had broken and the cam follower was very badly worn - even the pivot was oval.

   


All looked good, but when I went to time it the timing was about 90 degrees advanced!  :shocked:

It didn't really make sense unless something had been assembled incorrectly to make up for wear (grasping at straws) or something had slipped.  Flywheel had been put on with an impact gun and seemed tight (timing marks are on the flywheel and primary cover), so problem must be under the timing cover, right?  No, all OK in there...

Then someone posted on the Guzzi singles facebook page about having a flywheel come off and roll down the road while riding!!!  Time to pull the flywheel...  Sure enough, it had slipped and sheared the key! The weird thing is that the flywheel seemed tight as you could use it to turn over the engine, but it would slip when the engine was making peak power in 4th gear - just like a slipping clutch. This makes sense because the flywheel is used to drive the engine sprocket that then drives the clutch gear.

Ended up buying some keystock and filing a new key, cleaning the taper surfaces, then heating the flywheel in hot water. And was more assertive with the impact gun.  Apparently, I was too busy to take good photos...


 

I did however change the oil and make a new "filter" for the sump complete with a magnet to catch debris:





Bike has been starting and running and idling much better.  Points and plug:

   
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline smdl

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #339 on: May 05, 2019, 02:45:47 PM »
 :thumb:
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Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #340 on: May 06, 2019, 09:11:53 PM »
Been accumulating the parts (cash) to replace the bad & bent Ercole truck bars on the GTV.  A new bar (100 Euro), required a new throttle (50 Euro) and new levers (120 Euro).  All prices approximate as I've tried to forget...

Decided not to buy the separate choke and advance levers for another 125 Euro each or what ever...  My stubbornness has resulted in one of my sillier shop projects - a clamp.

The levers off the old bar were usable, they just needed a clamp for the new bar.  And what is a clamp, but a square with a hole in it, cut in half and screwed together? 

Spent $5 on some bar stock at the local steel monger.  Cut it to size and chucked it in the lathe - first time using the 4 jaw chuck!

   


Drilled some holes for the pinch bolts.




It was looking a bit crude, so fired up the trusty hand mill:





Drilled and tapped some holes for mounting stud and locating pin and cleaned it up a bit more.

      


Ended up having to turn about about 0.020" off the OD of the decompressor bar end fitting.  This also required drilling a cable hole and lock screw hole in the new bar (drilling through chrome  :sad: ).  Used the lathe a 3rd time in a day to make a cool little cable stop fitting for decompressor cable - but forgot a picture.





Then had to assemble the new spiral throttle.  First, there was a LOT of fiddly fitting as the seam in the new bar didn't allow the inner spiral to turn and the milling of the slot had splayed the bar end slightly so the throttle grip wouldn't slide over.  Once that was taken care of another hole had to be drilled through the new bar for the locating screw.  A spiral throttle has 10 parts - inner & outer sleeves, cable shuttle, guide pin and bushing, cable stop, locating screw, friction spring, chrome end cap and bolt.  Is it any wonder they're not used any more?!

   



The new bars are straighter, narrower, lower and don't pull back as far so they don't drive like a truck.  They look better and the mirrors are more useful.  The bike fits me better.  This has been a very positive improvement!

   



1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

canuck750

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #341 on: May 06, 2019, 09:41:21 PM »
Your skills are very impressive  :bow: :bow: :bow:

great information as always

Online Dave Swanson

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #342 on: May 07, 2019, 02:17:40 PM »
Dream bike!!  Great job!
Dave Swanson - Northern IL
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Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #343 on: December 08, 2019, 08:11:51 PM »
Been a while since I posted - been riding and wrenching so their's more to report.

Most useful thing is probably Patrick Hayes translation of the original 1949 GTV shop manual.  I updated it with photos and diagrams and added something on magnetos and a couple pages on parallelogram forks.  The construction of Falcones and Airones is so similar to the GTV that owners of the those bikes will also find it useful.  Greg Bender is now hosing it on his site:

http://www.thisoldtractor.com/mg_manuals/workshop_manual_gtv_en.pdf





If there is one thing I could have known going into this engine it is that the aluminum is not low expansion and that the bearings must be securely staked into the cases.  Any problems with loose bearings are exacerbated by the fact that the clutch spring tries to pull the clutch bearing out of the case and pulling the clutch lever tries to pull the drive side bearing out of the case.
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #344 on: December 08, 2019, 08:43:08 PM »
In June the factory sent the info that my bike was built as a GTV Feb. 18, 1937 and that it was originally painted Amaranto - Amaranth.





Lechler is an Italian paint manufacturer in Como that still makes the color - they have a fantastic range of colors for Italian classic cars and bikes.  Jerry K and Spencer G have done tons of research to match the color.

Jerry came up with this formula for Centari acrylic enamel Gallon Mix size:
758S Drier      178.0
705A Black (HS)   242.6
701 White   307.6
723A Violet   409.4
749A  Maroon (HS)  1639.9
748A Mon Violet  3559.3

Centari was originally a DuPont product but it was sold or rebranded as Axalta which is difficult to find here.  According to an Axalta rep it is not available on the coasts due to the high VOCs so called Finishmaster, an Axalta dealer in Appleton, Wisc. 920-757-6233. Kris answered and I sent her Jerry's mixing formula and she said they can mix it in Centari acrylic enamel.  She said they'd have to match it to other brands, but there was a cross reference to PPG 51167.  Her email address is: morkleek@finishmaster.com.

51167 is the same PPG code Spencer Graves came up with by matching paint Stucchi sent him. 
It apparently crosses over to a GM stripe color:
GM79A       WASL 8663     WA8663
                   Dark Claret      Dark Garnet

Wesco Autobody has a color map book which matches the GM color as page 401 H-3.

I had two pieces (photo) that seemed to have original paint  and compared them to the PPG color map book and the purpler speedo blanking plate is close to 51167, but very slightly lighter and browner - it is closest to page 402 G-4.  The browner fork link is p405 H-3.  A request on the Guzzi single cyl. group was unanimous that the purpler color was the closer match.





1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #345 on: December 10, 2019, 10:46:25 PM »
The front brake on the GTV is absolutely horrible - it does almost nothing even after a reline and arcing the shoes, a new cable and fitting a longer brake arm.  Part of the problem is that it is only about 3/4" wide and about 7" diameter.  Turns out the brake, in fact both wheels, are from an earlier Sport 15 ca. 1930. 

The brakes are bad AND wrong. 

Eventually a guy posted two wheels for sale that were correct - a chance to get correct brakes that worked better.  Problem was they'd been sitting in a barn in New England for several decades and he wanted more than I paid for my car for each wheel!!!   

   

OK, it was a cheap car.

The brakes arrived but the front drum was kinked - it looks like someone used a pry-bar between the drum and the shoe. :shocked: 
The outer edge of the drum was bent out 0.5-1.0mm.  It was bad enough that you could see it just looking at the empty drum.  The actual low spot was only about 50mm long at the outer edge and diminished to 0mm at the back of the drum.  Unfortunately the drum is too thin to true-up on a lathe. 

A friend and I were looking at it and he noticed machining marks that suggested it was turned from steel rather than cast iron.  Steel is not as brittle as cast iron so we decided to try to straighten it by brute force. 
 :boozing:

We chucked it on a brake lathe to find the low point and mark it.




We found a large disk brake rotor with a hub just slightly smaller than the id of the drum and shimmed it closer.

Clamped the disk in a vice and hit the high point of the drum with a suitable drift and 3lb. hammer. 

Re-chuck in lathe to check and repeat hammer and drift until close.  Unfortunately I didn't take a picture of it.

We then hung the drum from the jaws of the vice (resting at the edge of the low spot) and finished the job by whacking and re-checking and repeating as needed.




The worst wobble is now about 0.005" (about 0.13mm) which is about the drum's total run-out so I will ride it and only turn it if there is a problem. 

It is great to have resourceful friends!   :thumb:
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #346 on: December 16, 2019, 11:40:09 PM »
More on the brakes...
Hubs were cut from the rims so I'll need to order spokes - 4 different lengths!

         
   
 

Sent the parts to soak in the spa.  A little Krud Kutter followed by a vinegar bath and a Ospho spritz.

            


Bad cracks in the cush drive plate:  Weld?  Braze?

   


Front tapered rollers have an 18mm ID - weird size but I found them in France...  Rear bearings are standard 6204.



1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #347 on: December 22, 2019, 01:48:50 PM »
About a month ago the gas tank started leaking next to a brazed repair at the front of the tank.  The steel had rusted next to the brass, the paint bubbled and there was a little trickle of gas.  I JBWelded a similar hole last year so the tank needs to be stripped and repaired correctly.  This would be a good time to repair the chain gaurd too because it also needs welding...

          


So the tank will need new paint...

I could spray paint it with rattle cans, but that would look bad.

And both fenders need welding too, so it would be a good time to fix them.  Then they would need paint...

And the new brakes need paint too....

And this would be the perfect time to replace the brazed up fork I've been riding on - and the replacement needs paint...

So that leaves the frame.  But the engine has to come out of the frame again because I accidentally ran it with the oil shut off. :embarrassed:  Patrick says they can run 50 miles on splash but I need to check it.  This would be the time to repaint the frame...

And it's all painted the wrong color anyway - it should be dark Amaranth.

It took me about a week to decide to tear it down. :tongue:

Somehow I've convinced myself to rebuild the brakes and build wheels for them, rebuild the fork, repair the fenders and tank, rebuild the engine, and have it painted all at the same time!   :shocked:

How does this happen? 





Man there are a lot of parts - Hope I remember how to put it together!   
« Last Edit: December 22, 2019, 01:49:38 PM by SED »
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline smdl

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #348 on: December 22, 2019, 03:29:37 PM »
You've got this, and it's gonna be great!

How does this happen?  Wrong guy to ask, for sure, as it's happened to me many times!  😑

Interesting about running the engine with the oil off.  I was thinking about just such a possibility, recently, while watching a video of a guy going through the startup sequence on a Galetto.  I'm afraid that I might do just the save thing!

Cheers,
Shaun

'74 Eldorado Police
'74 Eldorado Civilian
'75 850-T
'17 V7 III Stone
'20 V85 TT

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #349 on: December 22, 2019, 10:16:07 PM »
If someone had told me this was part of a motorcycle I wouldn't have believed them!




a "video" of the tear-down   :laugh:
https://youtu.be/GvpXYVyKEp8
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline jas67

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #350 on: December 23, 2019, 08:36:11 PM »
If someone had told me this was part of a motorcycle I wouldn't have believed them!




a "video" of the tear-down   :laugh:
https://youtu.be/GvpXYVyKEp8

Looks like something off a tractor.... oh wait, this is a  Guzzi, thus, it IS a tractor.
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Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #351 on: December 23, 2019, 11:31:33 PM »
 :grin:


1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline Rick4003

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #352 on: December 24, 2019, 07:10:35 AM »
Nice one! I did something similar to my first bike, just had to change the tires... Ended up taking the whole thing apart and got the frame painted and all kinds of other things. :grin:

Can't wait to see the new paint, and the repairs on the way there
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996 - SOLD

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #353 on: December 24, 2019, 12:22:47 PM »
 :grin:  Thanks Rick and SMDL.  I've gotten a ton of support from people on this site - and on the Guzzi singles (cylinder!) site:
https://groups.google.com/forum/?hl=en#!forum/guzzi-singles

I don't want to restore it because it will get ridden and rained on and dirty and scratched and dinged.  And repairing the gas tank for chrome is nearly impossible.  I'd really like for some magic way to put 10 year old paint on it and go ride it... 

Worst part is probably the fenders and chain guard - they are cracked and bent and poorly repaired in several places.  It will require making and welding in (by an expert) patch panels... 

Trick is to get all the old paint off.  I used to use paint stripper (aircraft remover) but since methylene chloride has been removed it doesn't work.  (good riddance - methylene chloride is a known carcinogen and neurotoxin.  It's toxic effects have killed people on the job!) 

So I made a hot tank from the bottom of an old water heater and just added a couple pounds of lye.  Most of the paint (and grease) comes off with a hose.  A wire brush for the tough stuff and then chase it with a scotchbrite and ospho to protect from rust:

           


Even found some of the original amaranth paint:




Some need welding, sandblasting, rebushing, chroming, painting and parkerizing.  What a lot of parts!





1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #354 on: December 30, 2019, 11:22:49 PM »
Don't want to scratch paint so fitting the new chain guard on the bench...




Starting on the body work by making a pattern to fit the inside of the rear fender.  Got it pretty straight but the old hinge was a weird mismatch of welded crap.

   


Edit to show the result:

          
« Last Edit: January 03, 2020, 12:49:52 AM by SED »
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #355 on: January 20, 2020, 01:46:12 PM »
More rear fender repair...

Template for making sure the cross profile is consistent:




Loose rivets, crappy repair and then loose bolts resulted in...

 


Made a doubler and decided to glue it in with JBWeld because I was pretty sure my brazing skills were not up to it. 

      


The hinged fender tail also needed repairs.  The original riveted license bracket had been welded to the fender.  When the bike was repainted the remains of the weld were hammered below the fender profile tearing the sheet metal.  The damage was puttied over and a new, incorrect bracket bolted over the top.  Decided to braze the doubler for this one after a little practice.  Don't know why I didn't take a photo - probably because it's not pretty.




The fender tail also needed a misplaced hole welded closed (which I did after practicing with a borrowed mig welder) and a new fender stay made.  It had an asymmetric stay of flat stock that warped the tail out of alignment and interfered with the chain guard. 

The trick would be turning flat stock (McMaster-Carr 2mmx20mm) into 1/6 round stock (approx) with the tools at hand.   Got some angle, found an old wrist pin (grind the ends so it doesn't dimple the steel as much) and a borrowed press. 

     


<edit - Anneal the steel before pressing.  This one cracked about 3cm.  I had thought it was just the surface, but later found it cracked all the way through.  A little tack welding fixes it.>

Results turned out pretty good.

         


Front fender is worse!


« Last Edit: January 26, 2020, 10:47:07 PM by SED »
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #356 on: January 20, 2020, 03:50:35 PM »
 :thumb: :thumb:
Charlie

canuck750

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #357 on: January 20, 2020, 08:29:56 PM »
WOW, you sir are a craftsman  :bow: :bow: :bow:

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #358 on: January 26, 2020, 12:18:44 AM »
The GTV had been high centered a couple times which dented the spring tubes against the springs.  This meant that the springs had to be driven out of the tubes with a looong drift.  An exhaust pipe expander (Harbor Freight!) and a little light tapping with a body hammer to massaged out the worst of the dents. 
Springs drop right in and out now.  :smiley:



      
 
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline SED

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Re: Bacon Slicer project
« Reply #359 on: January 26, 2020, 10:38:33 PM »
The front fender was a mess.  There was a big dent where the fender hit the sidecar lug on the frame (wrong fork spring). The riveted fork bracket had been torn from the fender and bar stock welded on to replace it.  Probably with a stick welder.  It was stress cracked and rewelded where it necks down for the fork.  There was another rewelded stress crack on one side above the rear stay which had been replaced with bar stock.  Because the fender was so distorted one side of the replacement stay was 3/4" longer than the other.  And there was a bite out of the flare at the trailing edge - how did that happen???  :shocked:  The flare itself was noticeably asymmetric.

                  


Hammered out the dent first. The fork bracket mess had to be next because its location would determine the length of the rear fender stay.  I cut off the bracket with a hacksaw, hand file and die grinder and was left with 4 rivet holes, a tear and a lot of wrinkled steel.  After getting the steel as straight as possible (for me) decided to braze in a doubler then fill the surface wrinkles with JBWeld and rivet through that using the original rivet holes. 

             


The bracket steel is 2x20mm stock from McMaster-Carr.  The trick was to get the height right so the fender didn't sag over the wheel. There's probably a smarter way to do this, but I decided to bolt the fender in the fork and install the wheel to get the contour right.  To get it up to working level I clamped it in the vice!   :boozing:   Only screw-up is that I'd mistakenly used too many flat head rivets on the rear fender so had to use domed rivets.  Rivet counters take note!  :grin:

          


With the front stay and the fork bracket I could start to make sense of the rest of the fender.  It had been pulled back violently on the left side and the cracks welded up with no regard for true radius.  It had then been splayed to fit the fender stay so, hoping that restoring the width and cross-section would also bring it back to true, I cut internal and external wood patterns to get the width approx right (pic is rear fender with cardboard pattern).  The work revealed the stress crack repair at the fork had changed the radius on the fender on the left.  The only solution was to rebend the steel where it necks down to pass through the fork.  I heated the whole area red hot and was able to get to within 1/4" of the other side. There is a pucker in the fender line at the fork, but not very visible standing beside it so will probably leave it. 

         
   

The steel had cracked when I made the rear stay so I annealed the bar stock before pressing the contour.  Then messed around with the fender radius (above) to get the stay length right so that it would not be under tension when bolted up and it was symmetric side to side and centered over the wheel.

      


With the rest of the fender anchored and (relatively) true the fender flare could be tackled.  First was to get it as symmetric as possible with wood patterns then determine the radius of the flare to make a hammer form.  The first radius was too small so made a larger one.
 


Larger radius - borrowed English (chinese) wheel to get flare, then heat with borrowed torch to get compound curve, then cut out original Mandello steel (Yikes!) and fit patch.



Welded in place with borrowed MIG welder. (there's a pattern here...  :tongue:)  Lots of grinder action and hammer and dolly to get it presentable - then check with wheel.  Finally riveted and glued (with JBWeld) the rear stay.

               


I'm happy with it because I learned a lot and it looks way better than expected.   :afro: 
« Last Edit: February 02, 2020, 12:13:47 AM by SED »
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

 

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