Author Topic: What is the future for MG?  (Read 5858 times)

Offline Vagrant

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #150 on: April 24, 2021, 09:59:12 AM »
Guzzi has always been a basically one-engine size company with maybe two slightly different body styles. They have never competed in multiple sizes like the major brands.
In the 1970's it was the 750 that got enlarged to the 850 but just Ambassador, Eldorado, then the T. They grew to the almost 1000 CC's with again maybe two styles. Now we're back down to the small block 750/850 with, that's right two basic styles.
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #151 on: April 24, 2021, 10:08:13 AM »
Guzzi has always been a basically one-engine size company with maybe two slightly different body styles. They have never competed in multiple sizes like the major brands.
In the 1970's it was the 750 that got enlarged to the 850 but just Ambassador, Eldorado, then the T. They grew to the almost 1000 CC's with again maybe two styles. Now we're back down to the small block 750/850 with, that's right two basic styles.

Not exactly true. Concurrent with the first "big block", there were 50 cc Guzzis, the 125 Stornello, 500 singles (Falcone, Nuovo Falcone) then the "small-blocks" beginning in '76 - the V50. Not to mention all of the various Benelli rebadge "Guzzis".
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Offline Bulldog9

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #152 on: April 24, 2021, 10:19:38 AM »
Here’s something strange to me at this point. Some of you guys say you’re seeing lots of younger guys on the MG, v7 etc. I guess the part of the country and countries you are in determine that as well as dealership availability. As most of you know I live in central NC and in the years Ive been a Guzzi fan and owner I’ve only seen a couple MG bikes in the wild. However I have seen several Ducati bikes ridden by older and younger riders. I think the reason for this is due to little to no exposure to the brand. The first MG I ever saw was an El Dorado, probably an early 80s. It had fishtails and sounded great. The rider was a younger guy who said it was his dads bike. I feel in love with it then and it took 20 years later to get my first on, an 04 California EV, black and chrome. Now here’s my point. The magic that I felt over that first encounter, I don’t believe will exist with this new market of the brand. And yes our opinions on this is simply that “opinions” and this is mine.

No doubt dealer presence makes a difference.

I have 3 dealers in my area, one 10 miles, one 70, one 140.
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #153 on: April 24, 2021, 10:43:42 AM »
Our perspective in North America is unique from the rest of the planet.   I think the small block was originally imported in 1984, just one year, it didn't sell well, and wasn't seen again over here for two decades.

I read in one of the Guzzi history books, that it was the small block, such as the Nevada, that kept Guzzi from "actually" going out of business.  They sold many many more SB across Europe and else where than they did BB.
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #153 on: April 24, 2021, 10:43:42 AM »

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #154 on: April 24, 2021, 11:56:55 AM »
Our perspective in North America is unique from the rest of the planet.   I think the small block was originally imported in 1984, just one year, it didn't sell well, and wasn't seen again over here for two decades.

I read in one of the Guzzi history books, that it was the small block, such as the Nevada, that kept Guzzi from "actually" going out of business.  They sold many many more SB across Europe and else where than they did BB.

Small-blocks were sold here starting in '78? on through '87 IIRC. V50, V50 II, V50 III, V50 Monza, V65C, SP and Lario.
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #155 on: April 24, 2021, 06:38:18 PM »
Indeed, you are right,  my mistake.   However, my point still stands, they sold quite poorly over here.   I’d be surprised if the entire run was even 2500 units.
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Offline straycatskip

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #156 on: April 24, 2021, 08:10:23 PM »
I think MG's niche in the marketplace is in beautifully designed, simple, easily maintained nostalgia.  If they stick to that, they will do fine.  That is until climate change driven regulations eliminate the internal combustion engine for regular transportation in 15 to 20 years.  We probably won't mind since electric vehicle technology will have advanced several generations.  MG will no longer be able to play the nostalgia card,  however, and that will be the end of that.

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #157 on: April 25, 2021, 07:19:11 AM »
Absolutely regional differences, especially in the lack of a dealership are going to make huge differences, especially in the amount of younger riders who will be less likely to try a brand if there isn't local exposure and support.

A newer rider is much less likely to travel hundreds of miles for a bike. Absolutely.

And, generally speaking, have less disposable income.

I figure a product that appeals to a younger demographic is perhaps a better long term plan. As the boomers age out, that market segment will simply shrink away. Any company has to have a product that people are willing to buy.

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Offline s1120

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #158 on: April 25, 2021, 07:25:57 AM »
Absolutely regional differences, especially in the lack of a dealership are going to make huge differences, especially in the amount of younger riders who will be less likely to try a brand if there isn't local exposure and support.

A newer rider is much less likely to travel hundreds of miles for a bike. Absolutely.

This is it right there..  Your not going to get many of the young, or new riders in a area that just doesn't have the dealer support for that brand. Im my area I have not seen a "modern" SB V7 of any generation in the wild.. nor a V85, but granted that bike is only a few years old at this point. Looking back we have not had any dealers in the area in im thinking almost 20 years, so that makes sense. A young/new rider will mostly be looking to get a bike that they see around.. buddys have, maybe having seen ride by, or stopped at the local gas station.. 

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #159 on: April 25, 2021, 07:41:21 AM »
Even I was shocked one time last year when heading for my in-laws when I noticed a V9 pull through the intersection.

Then I realized we were about 5 miles south of a newer (past 5 years) Guzzi dealer.
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Offline s1120

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #160 on: April 25, 2021, 07:55:38 AM »
Even I was shocked one time last year when heading for my in-laws when I noticed a V9 pull through the intersection.

Then I realized we were about 5 miles south of a newer (past 5 years) Guzzi dealer.

Ya, all I see in any numbers local are people passing through..  Being a small historic area, between the Hudson valley, and the Berkshires, we get a lot of bikes traveling.  Mostly any Guzzis seem to be Norges, or Stelvios.  Kind of makes the most sense for travelers.
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Offline Bulldog9

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #161 on: April 25, 2021, 08:04:32 AM »
Marketing and dealer 'presence' in the community is a big piece of the puzzle as well. My local 'Powersports' dealer that carries Yamaha, Kawasaki, Suzuki, Honda, Ducati,  Can Am, Polaris, Slingshot with all the water and ATV things is all over the place for advertising, community events, print and radio.

My first move to the DC area was 2005, and my local Guzzi dealer is 1 mile from my In laws, 8 miles to my house, and 2 miles from where I worked (Fort Myer). I drove/rode past the dealership for 2 years.....

I was here 05-07, then back in 2010-2015, and NEVER knew there was a Moto Guzzi/Aprilia dealer. I knew of the shop, but thought all they had were Scooters, because that's all they put out front. I bought my first Guzzi from MI in Seattle, which I actually knew about even though I had never lived on the West Coast. When I moved back to DC in 2018, I did a search for local MG dealers and was shocked to find one .

It is in a terrible location, but they are invisible to the local MC community, so unless you are 'looking' for a Moto Guzzi or Aprilia, you'd never know they were there. MG needs to up their AD game.
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #162 on: April 25, 2021, 08:15:35 AM »
Marketing and dealer 'presence' in the community is a big piece of the puzzle as well. My local 'Powersports' dealer that carries Yamaha, Kawasaki, Suzuki, Honda, Ducati,  Can Am, Polaris, Slingshot with all the water and ATV things is all over the place for advertising, community events, print and radio.

My first move to the DC area was 2005, and my local Guzzi dealer is 1 mile from my In laws, 8 miles to my house, and 2 miles from where I worked (Fort Myer). I drove/rode past the dealership for 2 years.....

I was here 05-07, then back in 2010-2015, and NEVER knew there was a Moto Guzzi/Aprilia dealer. I knew of the shop, but thought all they had were Scooters, because that's all they put out front. I bought my first Guzzi from MI in Seattle, which I actually knew about even though I had never lived on the West Coast. When I moved back to DC in 2018, I did a search for local MG dealers and was shocked to find one .

It is in a terrible location, but they are invisible to the local MC community, so unless you are 'looking' for a Moto Guzzi or Aprilia, you'd never know they were there. MG needs to up their AD game.
I agree that MG needs to “up their ad game” however when they only offer now very limited options they still only have a small segment of the MC population, therefore even if they had a store on every corner the brand would still be a stale company. The main reason HD has such a large segment of the riding population it due not only to its dealership locations and support but also they offer a bike that the majority of riders would and DO buy.

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #163 on: April 25, 2021, 10:03:21 AM »
I think the prognostications on Guzzi's demise are well overstated.  This is a niche company that makes niche products. They have never been a sales behemoth or had much of a footprint outside esoteric circles of enthusiasts (beside their short stint supplying bikes to CA highway patrol).   Judging from their dealer network and support, it doesnt even seem like they want to move beyond that (in the US at least).

There are plenty of companies who make their hay selling quirky/retro/niche products to those who want them, and dont really offer anything outside that to attract other buyers/demographics. 
For example, I have this espresso machine.. This company is now owned by Iily, but for a long time they were indy and made only retro espresso machines. They eventually got bought out by a big company and became just one part of their product mix (kinda like MG and piaggio)



Is it the best espresso machine on the market? Hell no. Does it have the strongest pump, the best boiler, does it pull the most consistent shots?  No. But it's passable/competitive if operated correctly, it is very basic to use, it has no worthless bells & whistles, no 'convenience features' no timers, no automatic frothing settings. Just an on/off switch and a brew switch and a toggle hi/low/ temp control. Plus is looks funky and retro and its unique.

I think Guzzi fills a similar niche, they sell a few thousand bikes a year, and at least pre-- they were making the parent company money, and were trending in an ok direction.  Not every motorcycle company can be Honda. That's just peachy for me.

As for the big blocks going away, I dont really care. The current gen has very similar engine layout, the 850 in the V85 is almost a strong as my 1100 Breva, and the bike weighs 100# less.
If people wanted more CARC bikes and 1400 cruisers, they probably would have sold instead of languishing on dealer floors.  Moto Guzzi has a strong seller in the v7 that pays homage to the company history, and the v85 and v9 are good variants off that. I dont know what ya'll expect. They arent going to continue making bikes that dont sell.



Agree on so many accounts.    :thumb:

Online Alfetta

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #164 on: April 26, 2021, 08:56:40 AM »
New Moto GuzzE.

« Last Edit: April 26, 2021, 08:59:12 AM by Alfetta »
NO, It's not pronounced "moder goosy"

Online sdcr

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #165 on: April 26, 2021, 09:11:58 AM »
You should trademark that name :grin:

New Moto GuzzE.


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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #166 on: April 26, 2021, 09:48:17 AM »
Here’s something strange to me at this point. Some of you guys say you’re seeing lots of younger guys on the MG, v7 etc. I guess the part of the country and countries you are in determine that as well as dealership availability. As most of you know I live in central NC and in the years Ive been a Guzzi fan and owner I’ve only seen a couple MG bikes in the wild. However I have seen several Ducati bikes ridden by older and younger riders. I think the reason for this is due to little to no exposure to the brand. The first MG I ever saw was an El Dorado, probably an early 80s. It had fishtails and sounded great. The rider was a younger guy who said it was his dads bike. I feel in love with it then and it took 20 years later to get my first on, an 04 California EV, black and chrome. Now here’s my point. The magic that I felt over that first encounter, I don’t believe will exist with this new market of the brand. And yes our opinions on this is simply that “opinions” and this is mine.

Almost everytime I stop either of my Guzzi's anywhere in NC: gas station, parkway overlook, restaurant, coffee shop, bike night... someone asks me about it. I will say the v65 (which has a modern V7 tank on it and looks pretty much like a cafe'd V7) gets more looks, nods, questions, and 'my uncle had one of those' than the Breva.  So some sort of brand awareness is there.  I don't think this extends to the cruiser guzzi bikes, because if you dont know bikes, they just look like a Harley or a Japanese 'Harley knock-off' from 20ft away.
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Offline Moparnut72

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #167 on: April 26, 2021, 10:08:13 AM »
I ride an Audace.  I get asked from time to time "What model of Harley is that?" I have a license plate frame that  says "Not A Harley."
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Online Dimitri_Harkov

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #168 on: April 26, 2021, 10:16:07 AM »
Almost everytime I stop either of my Guzzi's anywhere in NC: gas station, parkway overlook, restaurant, coffee shop, bike night... someone asks me about it. I will say the v65 (which has a modern V7 tank on it and looks pretty much like a cafe'd V7) gets more looks, nods, questions, and 'my uncle had one of those' than the Breva.  So some sort of brand awareness is there.  I don't think this extends to the cruiser guzzi bikes, because if you dont know bikes, they just look like a Harley or a Japanese 'Harley knock-off' from 20ft away.

I guess that's because...

1) It looks like a motorcycle. In contrast to the Breva, Griso, modern 'insects' with two wheels...
Like in: a stereotypical standard motorcycle that in ages past any average Joe could ride.
I guess your Ambo triggers a similar reaction? And...

2) It does NOT look like a Harley and by extension you are not the stereotypical evil criminal that 'usually rides those'... :)

Cheers,
D.
« Last Edit: April 26, 2021, 10:20:59 AM by Dimitri_Harkov »
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #169 on: April 26, 2021, 07:19:49 PM »
I guess that's because...

1) It looks like a motorcycle. In contrast to the Breva, Griso, modern 'insects' with two wheels...
Like in: a stereotypical standard motorcycle that in ages past any average Joe could ride.
I guess your Ambo triggers a similar reaction? And...

2) It does NOT look like a Harley and by extension you are not the stereotypical evil criminal that 'usually rides those'... :)

Cheers,
D.
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« Last Edit: April 26, 2021, 07:21:13 PM by Ncdan »

Offline Bulldog9

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #170 on: April 26, 2021, 09:10:47 PM »
Bzzzzzz
 :grin: :evil:









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Offline lucky phil

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #171 on: April 27, 2021, 02:50:21 AM »
No one can accurately predict the future...

However, I can GUARANTEE you that I will NOT be owning an "electric Moto Guzzi" in my lifetime... :rolleyes: :rolleyes: :shocked: :shocked: :huh: :huh:
Yep, same.

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Offline lucky phil

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #172 on: April 27, 2021, 02:51:45 AM »
Never can be a while JJ. There may come a day we can’t get gasoline 🤔😂👍
Then I guess I'll need to learn how to make gasoline.

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Offline lucky phil

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #173 on: April 27, 2021, 03:01:09 AM »
I think the prognostications on Guzzi's demise are well overstated.  This is a niche company that makes niche products. They have never been a sales behemoth or had much of a footprint outside esoteric circles of enthusiasts (beside their short stint supplying bikes to CA highway patrol).   Judging from their dealer network and support, it doesnt even seem like they want to move beyond that (in the US at least).

There are plenty of companies who make their hay selling quirky/retro/niche products to those who want them, and dont really offer anything outside that to attract other buyers/demographics. 
For example, I have this espresso machine.. This company is now owned by Iily, but for a long time they were indy and made only retro espresso machines. They eventually got bought out by a big company and became just one part of their product mix (kinda like MG and piaggio)



Is it the best espresso machine on the market? Hell no. Does it have the strongest pump, the best boiler, does it pull the most consistent shots?  No. But it's passable/competitive if operated correctly, it is very basic to use, it has no worthless bells & whistles, no 'convenience features' no timers, no automatic frothing settings. Just an on/off switch and a brew switch and a toggle hi/low/ temp control. Plus is looks funky and retro and its unique.

I think Guzzi fills a similar niche, they sell a few thousand bikes a year, and at least pre-- they were making the parent company money, and were trending in an ok direction.  Not every motorcycle company can be Honda. That's just peachy for me.

As for the big blocks going away, I dont really care. The current gen has very similar engine layout, the 850 in the V85 is almost a strong as my 1100 Breva, and the bike weighs 100# less.
If people wanted more CARC bikes and 1400 cruisers, they probably would have sold instead of languishing on dealer floors.  Moto Guzzi has a strong seller in the v7 that pays homage to the company history, and the v85 and v9 are good variants off that. I dont know what ya'll expect. They arent going to continue making bikes that dont sell.

Not bad but not as nice as this. Electra Nivola, Italian of course. I've owned it for 17 years after i retired my Copper and brass La Pavoni pump handle machine. Like anything Italian it requires a little "fettling" from time to time.





Ciao
« Last Edit: April 27, 2021, 03:03:47 AM by lucky phil »
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #174 on: April 27, 2021, 03:15:06 AM »
I think it's save to say that the Italians know how to manufacture very beautiful things.
The design is amazing!

Cheers,
D.
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Offline twowheeladdict

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #175 on: April 27, 2021, 04:58:47 PM »
I believe I remember being young more than some on this forum, and my experience is probably similar to young people today that everyone is saying

I don't think most guys just decide to buy a bike on a whim or because it is perceived to be cheap transportation.  I think they have admired motorcycles since the first time they saw them and dream of owning one as soon as they are able.

All of my riding friends and myself never even set foot in a motorcycle dealership until after we bought motorcycles and possibly needed some maintenance part.  We just looked in the want ads and found a bike.  None of us even considered buying new or whether there was dealer support or even a motorcycle mechanic around.  We just wanted a bike so we bought the best one we could afford.

The fact that there weren't any Italian or German or English bike dealers around us also meant that the chances of us coming across a used bike from those brands was pretty slim.  All of my bikes except one were used bikes from private sellers until the kids were all out of the house. 

I didn't buy my first non-Japanese motorcycle until I picked up the 2010 Moto Guzzi V7 Cafe Classic in 2014.  That broke me of reliable Japanese motorcycles and since then I have owned Triumph, Royal Enfield and Harley Davidson. 

I believe young people today that are interested in motorcycles buy whatever they can afford and one day aspire to own Harley, Ducati, BMW, or whatever the premier manufacturer of that genre of bikes is. 
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Offline Joliet Jim

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #176 on: April 27, 2021, 06:07:54 PM »
Well looks like the Chicago area lost it's last Guzzi dealer. Future is bleak if they can't keep dealers.
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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #177 on: April 27, 2021, 06:14:13 PM »
Well looks like the Chicago area lost it's last Guzzi dealer. Future is bleak if they can't keep dealers.
Yep JJ that’s the whole point of this topic and I totally agree with you. 👍

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #178 on: April 27, 2021, 06:33:30 PM »
Regarding the discussion on lack of dealers.  I just returned from picking my V 85 up to have a repair done on the malfunctioning cruise control.  I got to thinking about prior posts regarding the lack of dealers and how that would impact potential new buyers if you are not close to a dealer.  This is the recap of travel time I have in my MG V 85 tt purchase (my first MG by the way.  Columbus area to Cincinnati.
1. Drive down and introduce myself to the dealer and see if this is somewhere I would like to purchase a motorcycle. Cadre Cycle.  Check. :thumb:
2. Drive down and test ride the V 85 to make a decision to purchase.  Check. :thumb:
3. Drive down and purchase motorcycle.
4. Drive down for first service.
5. Drive down for cruise control repair.

2 Hours round trip = 20 hours of travel time/minimum.
 
Some salient points:
1. I am semi retired and have the available time.
2. My wife is retired and super willing to either ride along or drop me off like today so I could ride the bike home.  (My Ram ProMaster had a fail today and now is at the dealer so I had to go to plan B and have my wife drive me down.
3. I feel fortunate that Cadre is consistently reviewed as one of a handful of top MG dealers in the country and I like dealing with them.
4. I try to incorporate side trips to parks and explore other areas to hike with my wife on some of these trips to make the trip fun,  and the ride home today in 80 degree weather was just perfect.

In conclusion, it is definitely a time commitment decision to buy one of these bikes for many people who don't have a dealer close by.  If they are a younger buyer who does not probably have that much spare time, will they be inclined to buy a MG when another brand/dealer is much closer?

Online tommy2cyl

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Re: What is the future for MG?
« Reply #179 on: April 27, 2021, 06:35:36 PM »
Whoops. 4 hour round trip Columbus to Cinci.  4 X 5 trips = 20 hours.

 

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