Author Topic: A smaller sized touring bike?  (Read 3175 times)

Online LowRyter

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #30 on: July 27, 2021, 06:51:51 PM »
Beautiful!

You're a scholar and a gentleman.  Thanks.  It was the motorcycle I was always looking for.
John L 
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #31 on: July 27, 2021, 07:09:36 PM »
Road going V85:
https://www.motoguzzi.com/us_EN/models/v85-tt/v85-tt-travel-850-v-twin-4s-2021/

And someone will figure out how to lower it an inch or two, like some do for the VStroms.
Scott

It can be had with the OEM lowered seat.
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Offline stubbie

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #32 on: July 27, 2021, 08:27:42 PM »
I've been looking the last few months for a bike between 800-1100 to use as a more long distance ride. There's not much around. The Adventure bikes seem to have taken over as the touring bikes, all tall 850mm seat height, 250 plus kg's. The sport tourer all 15-18 ltr tanks 220-240kg's drop handle bars. Looked at the Suzuki GSX 750 the other day only 3kg lighter than the GSX s1000. The Yamaha 900 tracer might work for you about 210kg 320km from a tank of fuel or an Aprillia Mana Gt 850 but they are manual or auto. Seat height and bars can be changed of course. You could look for an 850 Breva from 2006-2008.
« Last Edit: July 27, 2021, 08:34:29 PM by stubbie »

Offline Shorty

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #33 on: July 27, 2021, 09:26:52 PM »
I supposed that a bike that is often used for Round The World travel would have to be considered a touring bike.

I agree with the above.  I have often thought that a Honda Rebel 300 or 500 would be a good home for a DR 650 engine, or for that matter an XL650R engine.

I think emissions regulations makes those bikes impossible.  My understanding is that the big single won't meet a lot of new emissions standards, but that all current designs are "grandfathered" in.
[/b]

That makes sense. Yeah that DR in a street frame would've make a nice competitor for the Yamaha SR series.  :wink:


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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #33 on: July 27, 2021, 09:26:52 PM »

Offline Scout63

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #34 on: July 27, 2021, 10:17:27 PM »
What would Huzo say?  Iím stuck in the 70ís so I would pick an airhead or a big or small block Guzzi.  My v50 was bought new by the previous owner.  He installed a BMW S fairing and rode across the country and back with his wife and luggage. I thought he was crazy until I got it out on the highway.   I think if I were looking for a new smaller distance bike Iíd look at a new Royal Enfield or maybe a BMW vertical twin.
Ben Zehnder
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Offline willowstreetguzziguy

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #35 on: July 27, 2021, 11:18:14 PM »
Started this thread looking for a touring bike with factory fairing and bags at a wet weight around 500 pounds, capable of hauling rider, passenger and luggage for a multi day tour. (The GL650. Weighed in around 530 lbs.) I thought 30 years of technology could produce such a bike if it was desired but maybe itís not? I realize just about any bike could have bags thrown over the back and ridden for days on end. Iím thinking of a factory set up touring bike around 500 pounds that can carry 2 people comfortably. Is it possible?
« Last Edit: July 27, 2021, 11:32:46 PM by willowstreetguzziguy »
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Offline Testarossa

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #36 on: July 28, 2021, 12:02:25 AM »
Triumph Tiger with the factory Trekker pannier option. Or BMW F800 GS with one of several factory pannier kits. Both under 500 lb. Honda has its own pannier set for the CB500x.
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Online Perazzimx14

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #37 on: July 28, 2021, 05:14:28 AM »
The "Adventure" bikes have sort of taken the market and for good reason. They are just a better mousetrap :thumb:

It's the ones who've cracked that the light shines through!

Online geoff in almonte

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2021, 06:45:58 AM »
Smaller than what?

Smaller dimensions (seat height, weight)? Or displacement/horsepower?

The new Triumphs are a good choice.  I'm not talking Rocket 3 here, but their twins.

I replaced my 750lb/70hp CalVin with a 450lb/80hp Bonneville.  Add a windscreen, panniers, and luggage rack (factory$$$$ or not) and away you go.

The smaller Adventure bikes are good as well, but IMHO they are ALL butt ugly.

G
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2021, 07:04:48 AM »
The Versys 650 tourer ticks all of the boxes and comes with a screen and panniers too.

I have never owned on but know someone who does. He was part of a European tour to Spain and France we did a few years back and had no trouble keeping up with his O/H on the back loaded up with the panniers and a top box.

It weighs in at 217kg wet (478lbs) and looks like this.



« Last Edit: July 28, 2021, 07:05:18 AM by Sye »

Offline Motormike

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2021, 09:38:52 AM »
I don't understand this topic. What's a touring bike? A bike you tour on.

While true you can tour the country on "anything" it doesn't mean most riders would.  People ride across the country on bicycles, but I wouldn't try it!  Fresh out of college, I rode a Suzuki GT380 from Kansas City to Los Angles.  In the middle of the summer. Wearing an open-face helmet.  That was dumb, but I made it, sunburn and all. Would I try that today?  Not a chance! (Unless somebody paid me a lot of money!)  These days my definition of a touring bike: it needs the following: Hard bags, Wind protection, electric cruise control, a fuel range of 200 miles, min.  But that's just me, I'm old, soft and lazy.

Offline philwarner

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #41 on: July 28, 2021, 10:03:52 AM »
BMW had the K75 in an RT, S, and standard. But ultimately discontinued.
Honda's PC800 only lasted in production for a short time - but that was an unusually styled bike.

Honda PC800s are pushing 30 years old now, but have an avid following, which I recently joined, and can be had for 2 to 3 grand in good condition.  They are known for going hundreds of thousands of miles with just oil, battery, and tire changes.  However they are not light weight at 640 pounds wet, but the CG is low and a tractable engine makes slow speed handling not difficult.  I am about 5'6" now and can still flat foot it from the stock seat.  Oh, and the trunk can hold two full face helmets or a load of ice and beer.







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Offline Motormike

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #42 on: July 28, 2021, 10:14:53 AM »
Honda PC800s are pushing 30 years old now, but have an avid following, which I recently joined, and can be had for 2 to 3 grand in good condition. 





While I never warmed up to the "appliance white" ones, I do like them in red.   Definitely a bike that was ahead of its time.

Offline Roebling3

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #43 on: July 28, 2021, 10:56:00 AM »
I've 'toured' with most any bike type imaginable. For a number of years it was Ferrying bikes for guys that wouldn't ride in the dark, it's too far, I don't have the time to ride all that way. Amazing how well that paid - most times. Curiously they were mostly bmw's.

Now that I've aged out of bikes weighing more than ~350#'s I'm back to 650's and smaller, plus 2 strokes for quick, indecent fun.

I still believe a DR650 w/correct suspension changes, gearing, wheels, tires and brakes could be excellent. There's large amount of luggage to chose from including aux. fuel, plus lighting, handle bars, electric grips, wind screens.

I've had a short stack of Moto Guzzis' for the last 25 years, but 2 SV650S's have done close to 200K miles,collectively, (many of them BBGolds), with never a whimper or flat.  Do you want to Tour or repair?   R3~

Offline philwarner

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #44 on: July 28, 2021, 11:03:44 AM »
While I never warmed up to the "appliance white" ones, I do like them in red.   Definitely a bike that was ahead of its time.

Yes, I thought I preferred the black 94 and 95 models, but this 89 came up a few miles away and at an eventual $1500 price so I tried it as my "test" PC800.  In person the Pearl Pacific White grows on you - It is like a metallic Old English white that is actually a cream color.  The 90 models had the best Candy Apple red with clear coat that Honda called Candy Glory Red. The later reds skipped the clear coat and could become more orange if they spent too much time in the sun.

Unfortunately mine had a checkered past with the original owner hitting a deer in 2009, which totaled much of the plastic and his right shoulder, and was sold in 2019 to a guy in the UP who rebuilt it with Russian aftermarket "refrigerator white" mirrors and then sold it to the fellow in Arkansas who sold it to me.   I only learned this history after the purchase because it still had the original title and had not been registered by either of the intervening owners.
1996 California 1100 carb
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Offline stratoguzzi

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #45 on: July 28, 2021, 11:13:50 AM »
A California Vintage is a smaller tourer..now a days. A 750 or 850 Moto Guzzi set up like a vintage would be a good bike for travel. At least 100 pounds lighter but with hard bags, floor boards, and windshield.
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Offline Testarossa

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #46 on: July 28, 2021, 12:23:47 PM »
Quote
These days my definition of a touring bike: it needs the following: Hard bags, Wind protection, electric cruise control, a fuel range of 200 miles, min.

This is doable, easy. Triumph Tiger is available with cruise control and bags, weighs under 500 lb and will do 200 miles on a tank. But it's tallish.

What you won't find, unless you modify something, is a bike that looks and rides like a Goldwing, with the weight of a Rebel.
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Online Dilliw

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #47 on: July 28, 2021, 12:35:59 PM »
For under 500lbs and two up a Wee Strom is very hard to beat.  Complete aftermarket support, factory tour package or customize your own, mid 50s mpg, and very low entry cost. 

No they don't tickle your sole but they are a heck of a swiss army knife.

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Offline Bill929

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #48 on: July 28, 2021, 01:23:35 PM »
This is doable, easy. Triumph Tiger is available with cruise control and bags, weighs under 500 lb and will do 200 miles on a tank. But it's tallish.

What you won't find, unless you modify something, is a bike that looks and rides like a Goldwing, with the weight of a Rebel.

The Tiger 900GT now has a low version (29.92 inch seat height).  https://www.triumphmotorcycles.com/motorcycles/adventure/tiger-900-gt/gt-low
Bill
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #49 on: July 28, 2021, 07:20:37 PM »
My smaller retro 'touring' bikes:

a. 2000 W650(in 2006, on Goshen Pass, between WV and VA)
b. 2003 Bonneville Centennial Edition - basically a T100 (in 2006 - just prior to beginning a 4000 mile plus ride)
c. The Bonneville ride













Both great little bikes.  The Triumph was probably physically 10% larger overall than the W650.  Both were nice weekend trippers.  Actually took the Triumph on a two week ride from NE Ohio to AZ, north to WY, then headed for home.  Never felt the need for another 200 # of motorcycle!
« Last Edit: July 29, 2021, 07:48:44 PM by ohiorider »
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Offline Motormike

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #50 on: July 28, 2021, 08:37:45 PM »
This is doable, easy. Triumph Tiger is available with cruise control and bags, weighs under 500 lb and will do 200 miles on a tank. But it's tallish.
I consider any of the adventure models (that offer elec. cruise control) as viable touring bikes.  As I posted back in June (Last Big Tour), my current go-to touring bike is a BMW R1200gs.  A little heavy, but has all the creature comforts.  The smaller BMW GS750gs and 850gs have all the same features minus the hp and torque. 


Offline guzziboy66

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #51 on: July 28, 2021, 08:44:08 PM »
Forgive me if this was already mentioned.  I really want to try the MV Agusta Turismo Veloce...

Sorry - can't figure how to post a picture...


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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #52 on: July 28, 2021, 09:10:27 PM »
Are people not touring on the V7 series? Didnít Beaver just ride from Texas to New Hampshire?
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Online jrt

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #53 on: July 28, 2021, 09:23:26 PM »
I had a couple of long rides on a 2004 Breva 750.  That was an awesome bike, reliable as gravity.   Unfortunately- no electronic cruise control. 
I'm  5'10'' or so, and was just a bit cramped on it, but no real complaints.   I had a good time, even in the rain.
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Offline krglorioso

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #54 on: July 28, 2021, 10:53:36 PM »
What would Huzo say?  Iím stuck in the 70ís so I would pick an airhead or a big or small block Guzzi.  My v50 was bought new by the previous owner.  He installed a BMW S fairing and rode across the country and back with his wife and luggage. I thought he was crazy until I got it out on the highway.   I think if I were looking for a new smaller distance bike Iíd look at a new Royal Enfield or maybe a BMW vertical twin.

I have a '21 Royal Enfield "Interceptor 650" and it's a very nice bike at a very low price ($6820 OTD) but the OEM suspension is terrible and the seat, well, it's a nice looking seat.  Add a pair of IKON shocks  and a Russell Day Long Saddle and you're in business.  They weigh about 473# as delivered with full tank.  I lightened mine by 30# by swapping the 37# OEM exhaust for a 9.5# TEC 2 into 1 light stainless exhaust, removing the passenger footrests, grab rail and center stand. It's a good, solid bike that comes with a 3 year, unlimited miles warranty and free 3 year roadside assistance.  I've had no trouble in 2200 miles.

For a lightweight, inexpensive Guzzi touring bike, this:



Ralph

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #55 on: July 28, 2021, 11:58:51 PM »
My V7III is a great tourer, I only have a Top Box for luggage and sling all my tenting supplies on the seat behind me.
The secret to good camping is to take less crap, something I haven't managed to do properly yet.
It would be nice to have a container that could open up to accommodate a run to the grocery store.
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Offline geodoc

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #56 on: July 29, 2021, 12:38:46 AM »
For just this reason I sold my 2001 Triumph Sprint RS (535 lb wet w/o bags) and bought a Yamaha XSR700 (410 lb. wet). Center stand is from SW Motech. Stock seat is dreadful so Corbin on the way. Other than that, much to like - nimble, yet freeway stable. OK suspension. Have not seen an aftermarket fairing other than handle bar ones. Happy to go w/o one for the time being.





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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #57 on: July 29, 2021, 07:08:40 AM »
For under 500lbs and two up a Wee Strom is very hard to beat.  Complete aftermarket support, factory tour package or customize your own, mid 50s mpg, and very low entry cost. 

No they don't tickle your sole but they are a heck of a swiss army knife.

Yep!  FWIW, I got one in '12 (DL650A), very pleased with performance, fuel economy, cost to own/operate, dependability, etc.  After using it for years as an urban commuter (work ride) and riding it from Northeast Ohio to Utah a couple of times, I feel the bike owes me nothing.  It has no problem keeping up with my GS riding buds for a lot less expense.  It will run 6K mile trips without any noticeable oil consumption from it's 2400cc oil capacity.  So, here it is 9 years old, 45k miles on it, no oil or coolant leaks, ready to be ridden anywhere today. 


Offline elvisboy77

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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #58 on: July 29, 2021, 07:13:37 AM »
V85TT fits the bill nicely.
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Re: A smaller sized touring bike?
« Reply #59 on: July 29, 2021, 09:28:42 AM »
I would also like to see a real ďTOURINGĒ midsize motorcycle offered by all the major companies. When I say ďtouringĒ Iím saying  one that the buyer does not have to start replacing substandard equipment from the get go, to have a good tourer. When one has to do that, they have not purchased a true ďtouringĒ motorcycle.
Huzo is proving, as we speak, that any motorcycle can be equipped and used as a touring bike.

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