Author Topic: 1948 Airone - restoration  (Read 10878 times)

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #150 on: July 07, 2021, 09:10:07 PM »
Lovely work Jim .

 Dave , there isn't anything wrong with your bikes .

Thanks!

The frame and body parts are with the painter, slowly moving to the front of the line. My printer has lined up a pinstripe artist to hand line the gold and black lines and the chrome plated oil tank finally returned from the plating shop. Probably will end up being a mid winter timeline before it goes back together.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Online Scout63

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #151 on: July 09, 2021, 10:31:56 PM »
I love this build thread.  Your work is fantastic.
Ben Zehnder
Orleans, MA USA
1971 BMW R75/5
1972 Norton Commando Combat Interstate
1977 BMW R100S - next up to unload
1978 Yamaha SR500
1979 Moto Guzzi V1000G5 - T3FB mild custom
1979 Moto Guzzi V1000SP - on the lift

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #152 on: September 04, 2021, 06:14:32 PM »
I got some of the frame pieces back from my painter, enough parts to get started with the reassembly. These frame realted parts are painted in single stage enamel.



The fenders, gas and oil tank, tool boxes and leg shields will be painted base clear with the hand painted pinstripes and decals applied prior to the clear coat.

I cut cork rebound dampers and used two part epoxy to glue them to the swing arm.



Lots of threads to chase and openings to be cleaned out for bolts to pass through



Center stand mounted then the spring box went on, the long bolts passing from the back of the swing arm pivot and through the frame, installed the inner and outer springs and the spring retainers and lock nuts



Then I laid the motor on its side and blocked it up and then laid the rear frame / swing arm on its side and slid the frame section over the motor mount points, passed some dowels through and stood the frame / motor up



Next I installed the front frame section, waiting on the brake pedal and spacer for the main lower bolt that passes through the lower frame and spring box tabs, this will hold it for now



Just the begining of many things to assemble

« Last Edit: September 22, 2021, 09:46:50 PM by Canuck750 »
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Groover

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #153 on: September 05, 2021, 08:26:52 AM »
Nice job as usual, as well as keeping the paint type authentic (I think, right?)
1981 Moto Guzzi V1000G5
1987 Moto Guzzi LM1000SE, a
1987 Moto Guzzi LM1000SE, b
1980 Piaggio Vespa P200E
1980 Piaggio Vespa P125X
1980 Vespa Grande Moped
1980 Vespa SI Moped
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Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #153 on: September 05, 2021, 08:26:52 AM »

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #154 on: September 05, 2021, 06:00:14 PM »
Nice job as usual, as well as keeping the paint type authentic (I think, right?)

Thanks Groover, yes re the paint, the repair manual notes the paint is an enamel of some sort, originaly the decals and painted pinstripes were applied over the enamel and no clear coat over top though the decals 'may' have had a varnish sealer??

I got the rear frame rails on today and the shock mounts, had to hone out the new shock bushings to fit over the rechromed shock mount studs, fiddley work to get a nice snug fit.





Once again the shop troll had made off with some original parts, I carefuly dissasembled, tagged and bagged every part and took plenty of photos but after emptying every parts box and bag I can not find two of the M11 X 1.25 nuts that secure the rear frame blades nor the 12mm stud and nuts that secure the top of the frame pieces together, very frustrating, no doubt they will turn up in a year or two!

I made a new stud from stainless bar and threaded the ends to take M12 X 1.5 nuts I had



Anyone have a source for these missing M11 x 1.25 nuts, I hate to place an order with Retro for two nuts!

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #155 on: September 06, 2021, 08:44:38 PM »
I emptied a bin of front fork parts today. I took many pictures during dissasembly but still scratched my head figuring out the reassembly sequence, the manual text is ok and parts diagram is quite clear but the sequence is critical.

I started with a new rubber seal kit from Retro; two rubber cup seals for the bottom of each fixed fork leg and two rubber seals for the plunger rod guide tubes.

The Guzzi fork design is quite brilliant and very robust, the forks are shared between the 250 and 500cc bacon slicer bikes with the hydraulic front end. The forks are of the upside dwon design, the lower fork tube slides up and down guided by an upper fixed bronze bush in a steel retainer body and fastened to the fixed upper tube with three machine screws, one of which is hollow and takes a grease zert. The lower section of the moving tube runs between bronze guides, one a roller and the other a concave cup, the roller is adjustable by rotating a cam shaped axle. The moving fork lower tubes are hollow and they contain a damper rod with hydraulic valve, the fork tubes are partially filled with fork oil. The damper rod runs in a hollow tube that threads into the top of the sliding lower hollow tube and is limited in movement by the upper bush.

The lower seals



The lower bronze guides, I replaced these with new sets as the olr ones had worn flat spots,



The roller and cup are secured with axles that are cenetred in the removable alloy plate, the roller has an ecentric axle, each axle is hollow and has a grease zert



A  steel plate sits on top of the eccentric axle, then a chrome cover plate followed by a chrome outer coverwasher for the eccentric and a lock screw to set the eccentric once the roller cup is set to the lower fork tube



Then the lower fork tubes are stood up and the fork damper rod inserted, the manual says to fill the tubes to 260mm from the bottom of the fork tube.



The fork tubes is inserted from below, there is a left and right lower leg, then from the top the spring bottom stop is dropped down (champher down) followed by the spring and then a hard plastic spacer





Next the upper fork bronze bush goes in, the bush needs to be pushed down with a steel bar and aligned with the holes in the fixed fork leg, then the three concave washers and screws are insatlled





Once the bush is secured the fork damper guide drops in from above and it is threaded into the top of the lower moveable fork tube. The damper guide has a four sloted face top that takes a special socket, its the same one used on a Guzzi Loop Frame front crankshaft timing gear, I cut the socket in half and welded a section of matching diameter tube to make a very deep socket to tighten the damper holder



The home made deep socket



Hold the lower leg in a soft jaw vice and tighten the damper rod holder, now the fork lower tube is secured.

I just have to clean the internal threads on the top of the fixed tubes then I can insert the short rebound springs, thread in the caps and finish with the dome nuts over the tips of the damper rods sticking out the caps.

I got one more small job done, the seat is back on



I need more parts from my painter to keep going.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2021, 09:49:53 PM by Canuck750 »
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline cliffrod

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #156 on: September 06, 2021, 09:21:06 PM »
Man, that's a red motorcycle.  I've never done anything with one of those front ends.  That's really cool to see these details.  Looks great.  Thanks, Jim.
1973 V7 Sport  "Now THAT'S a motorcycle!"-  Master Sculptor Giuliano Cecchinelli
1967 V700 Corsa Record
1964 Ducati 250
eccetera, eccetera...

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Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #157 on: September 07, 2021, 11:09:11 PM »
Another Guzzi design feature that is new to me, the steering damper

Turning the bakelite knob pulls a rod through the fork stem, at the bottom of the rod a sloted dowel carries a flat steel blade that engages two rings, one steel and the second one a hard plastic, the hard plastic ring presses up against the upper bearing cone creating friction



a nice piece of engineering, no idea of how effective the design was / is?



to clean out the fork inner cap threads  used a large tap with a 1.25 pitch,



Forks ready to go back on

« Last Edit: September 22, 2021, 09:50:39 PM by Canuck750 »
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #158 on: September 11, 2021, 10:21:50 AM »
Jim, your Airone is looking so good!  Beautiful work.

I couldn't find a source for 11mm nuts that hold the battery box into the GTV frame. Valenti shows them, but got case screws instead.  We went back and forth, but the 11mm bolts and nuts never showed up.  Eventually I reamed the holes for 12mm bolts.

McMaster Carr shows m11x1 and m11x1.5 taps, but not x1.25.
https://www.mcmaster.com/metric-taps/system-of-measurement~metric/thread-size~m11/

I might have a couple of m11x1.25 nuts, but not sure the treads are any good.
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline Frenchfrog

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #159 on: September 12, 2021, 10:07:56 AM »
Lovely work ! Those steering dampers work really well and are so simple and quick to adjust .   

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #160 on: September 12, 2021, 11:11:13 AM »
Jim, your Airone is looking so good!  Beautiful work.

I couldn't find a source for 11mm nuts that hold the battery box into the GTV frame. Valenti shows them, but got case screws instead.  We went back and forth, but the 11mm bolts and nuts never showed up.  Eventually I reamed the holes for 12mm bolts.

McMaster Carr shows m11x1 and m11x1.5 taps, but not x1.25.
https://www.mcmaster.com/metric-taps/system-of-measurement~metric/thread-size~m11/

I might have a couple of m11x1.25 nuts, but not sure the treads are any good.

Thanks Shaun, I have sent an email to Retro asking for the 11mm nuts and I ordered some 11mm taps and dies off EBay from China. Hopefully Retro can help

Thanks Frenchfrog, I am looking forward to getting the rest of the frame parts back to keep moving with the build.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2021, 05:03:51 PM by Canuck750 »
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #161 on: September 21, 2021, 05:24:08 PM »
My painter called yesterday, the rest of the single stage enamel parts are ready, picked them up this morning, lots to continue with now, should get the fenders, tanks and tool boxes done by Christmas



I got just one piece back on but it is a big one in more ways than one, the 'bacon slicer' flywheel

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline cliffrod

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #162 on: September 21, 2021, 08:07:19 PM »
Man, I want a Guzzi with red paint like that all over it....  Those parts look really good, Jim.
1973 V7 Sport  "Now THAT'S a motorcycle!"-  Master Sculptor Giuliano Cecchinelli
1967 V700 Corsa Record
1964 Ducati 250
eccetera, eccetera...

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Offline Muzz

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #163 on: September 22, 2021, 04:16:46 AM »
Since the Rebuilds and Restos has had it's own spot I confess that i do not look as often.  It is work like this Jim that brings home to me what I am missing out on.

Once again, another fabulous Canuck rebuild.

Beautiful work Jim. :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:
Muzz. Cristchurch, New Zealand
03 Breva

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Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #164 on: September 22, 2021, 05:02:15 PM »
Thanks Muzz!

I assembled the rear dampers today, new seals, rubber bushings and bushing inserts from Retro



It takes a lot of fiddling to get the seals into these recess



Honed out the inner tubes



Then stood the lower body up, inserted the inner tube and filled with 30W until oil poured out the level hole, then inserted the damping rod, pushed down the rod until oil stopped flowing out and buttoned it all up



I had the caps and mounting spindles re chromed



Got the front frame spacers, foot peg brackets and rear brake pedal installed, repro rubbers from Retro



The repro rear peg rubbers don't fit the Astorino so I reinstalled the original rubbers, the repros are far too short, original on the left





And that's it for today, have to pick up some more bearing grease to get the front steering together.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2021, 09:22:06 PM by Canuck750 »
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #165 on: September 23, 2021, 06:13:15 PM »
I picked up a tub of grease, greased up the cones and installed the 1/4" diamter ball bearings,



Then it was an easy job to hang the forks and install the handlebars

48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline twodogs

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #166 on: September 24, 2021, 07:26:50 AM »
Always amazed at what you do, great work  :boozing:
Bruce
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1977 MG Convert

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #167 on: September 24, 2021, 02:20:40 PM »
Always amazed at what you do, great work  :boozing:
Bruce

Thanks Two Dogs!

I got the headlight back on today, not much more than that, its a warm sunny day and time to go for a ride




48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #168 on: November 30, 2021, 06:18:48 PM »
I finaly got some more parts back form the painter to continue with the Airone build, front and rear wheel hubs painted.

The rest of the sheet metal parts are getting close to final prime, my painter ground out all the high temp filler I had in the rear fender for powder primer and welded in new steel sections, I was reminded, firmly, to not help him out with my POS atempts at body work in the future.  :thewife:

New beaings in the rear hub, replaced the felt grease seal, getting the rim spoked turned out to be a real pain in the butt, I have been lacing wheels this week for other projects and none gave me any trouble.



The Airone rear wheel is center aligned, no offset but of the 40 spokes ten are 4mm shorter and I had marked the location and orientation of the shorter spokes, stll upon lacing I must have placed the short spokes incorrectly as I had to strip the wheel a couple times and relace it to get it finished.



As the axle mut be installed with the hub prior to driving in the bearings I can not use a truing stand, fitting the brakes shoes was alos a bit of a pain, the brake drum pins that support the shoes were a bit bent, starightening them after paint was tedious, lots of adjustment to shoe ends and pivots before the shoes moved smoothly



The sprocket has six rubber cush discs and there are two plates, one on each side of the sprocket that compress the rubbers, Getting the rubbers to only spread to one side of the sprocket took some time to figure out, otherwise the sprocket will not clamp down true to the hub





Brake drum and sprocket bolted to hub, I set the wheel in the frame



I will use the frame to true the rim



I am not looking forward to lacing the front wheel, it has a big offset from centerof the hub.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline cliffrod

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #169 on: December 01, 2021, 09:17:19 AM »
Looks really good, Jim.   
1973 V7 Sport  "Now THAT'S a motorcycle!"-  Master Sculptor Giuliano Cecchinelli
1967 V700 Corsa Record
1964 Ducati 250
eccetera, eccetera...

http://carolinasculpturestudio.com/
Carolina Sculpture Studio Channel on YouTube-
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzSYaYdis55gE-vqifzjA6A

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #170 on: December 03, 2021, 10:15:42 PM »
Rear rim sent off with an Avon tire to be mounted, I just don't trust my ability to mount a tubed tire without pinching and nicking the tube, had to many frustrating failures to bother anymore.

Assembling the front hub, both of the tappered roller bearings were worn out, these are the same as used in loop frame bikes, races pressed in and bearings greased



The felt seals were worn out, I found new felt sheet at Home Hardware in the furniture pad section, one side has adhesive but that will work fine with the glue faced side facing out, cut new felt seals with an exacto blade



felt seal is sandwiched between a sprung washer and a cupped washer



After pressing the seal assembly against the tappered roller a snap ring retains the bearing / seal onto each side of the hub, a threaded retainer is spun in on each side, a lot like a bicycle axle



shorter spokes (two different lengths) on the brake hub side



and all equal length spokes on the other side, I used plastic drywall plugs to temporarly hold the spoke heads in position while I spun on the spoke nipples



I had recorded the offset dimensions way back when I disassembled the wheel and propped up the rim with plastic boxes and steel scrap to match the offset position of the rim to the hub



Once the nipples were equally snugged up the rim was actually close to being true



Minimal up/down and side/side adjustments were required using a dial gauge to get to +/- 10 thou



Another rim off to get a tire mounted on Saturday, I always feel a major milestone in the rebuild has been met when the bike is rolling on its tires
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #171 on: December 05, 2021, 03:06:27 PM »
It has been just over one year since I started the restoration of the Airone, progress has been intermitent, mostly due to waiting on parts from Italy and my painters schedule, it is finally resting on its own two wheels





Of the hundreds of things that have needed attention I am liklely down to the last 100 or so





I may get the tin parts painted and pin striped by late winter, fingers crossed that the stars align with my painter and his pin stripe artist.

I can get on with all the hand controls, cables, electrical, etc........ but some time this winter I have to drop the engine in my 1975 Ducati 860 GT and figure out why the rear cylinder suddenly decided to smoke this past fall, perhaps an oil ring collapsed, I had the guides, seats and oil seals replaced in the heads, we shall see.

Old bikes, a constant hobby.


48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #172 on: December 06, 2021, 06:06:50 PM »
I had a brain fart moment yesterday, I am translating the Airone Owners Manual and going through the original Italian booklet I realized I have the front wheel on backwards, so I pulled the fork tubes out and swapped them around so I can get the front brake plate on the right hand side



While I had the wheel off I felt the brake shoes are jut too tight, I made a mandrel for the lathe and using a sanding belt turned inside out trimmed off a wee bit of the new linings.



repro battery box and retaining clamps



repro choke and manual advance levers, I had the handlebars and original levers replated, repro white handlebar grips



and a repro header and muffler




« Last Edit: December 08, 2021, 08:39:20 PM by Canuck750 »
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline SED

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #173 on: December 08, 2021, 10:47:16 PM »
Jim, your work is so exacting - great job!  You really did a nice job building those wheels (and the forks and the dampers and the...) - learned lots. I like your picture of the brakes in the lathe.  I need to do that on one of the Ariels so thanks for the tip!  It really is gorgeous sitting on its wheels.  Thank you for the time to take all the detailed pictures and write the documentation.
1983 LeMans III
1981 Monza
1947 Ariel Red Hunter
1939 Ariel Red Hunter
1937 Guzzi GTV

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #174 on: December 08, 2021, 11:40:04 PM »
Thanks Shaun!

Its certainly taking longer than I had thought to get this far, my painter keeps bumping me back on the list, probably due to me telling him I am not in a rush, but he is fixing my poor metal work so I am sure the end result will be worth it. I put in one more small order to Retro for a few last bits and pieces, the throttle that slides inside the handle bar was a poor reproduction that didn't fit with a damn and I am hopping the one he can get is better.

I have my fingers crossed that the bike will start.

I am getting close to finishing a translation of the 1948 Airone owners manual, it has plenty of good information for tuning etc, once done I will ask Greg Bender to put it on his This Old Tractor Moto Guzzi web page.

I also got a new cast iron cylinder and new piston for my GTV motor from Retro, once I get the crank ground I should have a fully rebuilt motor .... now to find a rolling chassis to put it into. I am thinking of heading to Italy for the big swap meet in a year to look for a roller.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #175 on: December 09, 2021, 08:36:03 AM »
Did you see the Astore back-half chassis that was for sale on the Moto Guzzi Singles Facebook group?
Charlie

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #176 on: December 09, 2021, 10:02:28 AM »
Did you see the Astore back-half chassis that was for sale on the Moto Guzzi Singles Facebook group?

I did, thanks for posting it. I think the asking price for what’s there is far too high. I am thinking a complete rolling chassis at the big swap meet in Italy would be in the 4 -6K range, I could be completely out to lunch, just a guess.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #177 on: December 09, 2021, 06:12:09 PM »
The magneto advance lever and the choke lever are reproductions and they come with an alignment pin in addition to the mounting bolt that passes through the handlebar welded on lever perches. The original levers did not have alignment pin and when pulling the levers the base can rotate. So I have to drill 3mm holes in the handlebar perches in the correct location to secure the lever assemblies.

To get the new holes in the right location I made a paper pattern of the underside of the new lever assemblies, punched out the large mounting hole and the 3mm pin hole, then taped the paper to the underside of the lever assembly



Then I mounted the lever assembly, aligned it to where I think it should face and then lifted the tape of the lever body and taped the paper to the handlebars



Then unbolt the lever body leaving the paper pattern on the perch, punch a drill center for the new 3mm hole



The pins were too tall, I ground off about 8mm and the pin sits just above the perch by 3mm



Now place the lever body over the pin and boly it secure from underneath, a lot of messing about to drill two 3mm holes!



The disappointing part is the solder cylinder ends for the clutch and brake levers are really to small, I will probably replace them. The ends for the choke and advance levers are not correct, I can file them to sort of work but again not the best, and the cables are of a larger diameter so they realy don't slide into the lever body cut outs or through the lever openings without file work.

I did get the advance cable and clutch cable to work, the front brake cable solder end twists in the lever when I pull the brake so it has to be redone. The advance and clutch ends use the screw on barrell ends typical of bikes of this era, I had a couple different sizes in my parts box so at least I got two cables done.





The throttle and choke cables do not have ends on them for the lever and throttle, I think I will need to get custom cables made for these.
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #178 on: December 14, 2021, 12:09:30 AM »
Been working on the electrical for a couple days, some things from 1948 are brilliant, I wish they still fitted spark plug caps of this quality today, the cap has a removable bayonet type threaded spike that pierces the high tension lead when screwed in tight, on the other end a brass disc is soldered to the bare tension lead, when screwed into the magneto the disc make solid contact with a brass mate



all solderd up and fitted





Reconnecting all the wires to the amin light swithc (Aprilia) in the headlicght bucket I get intermittent shorts and illumination



replaced all the wires, even the light switch to terminal block searching for a short,



eventually found it in the worn switch, try as I might to fix it the old switch mechanism is badly worn and the 'key' which is turned 45 degrees L or R from center for park and running lights does not positivley lock and I get a short, nothing or a flicker. Some of the terminal wires have been repalced before and the sequence does not match  the wiring diagram in the manual, looks like previous owner had issues with the lighting and tried a bodge to get the ligths to stay on



looks like previous owner had taken the switch apart in the past and the tabs that secure parts of it are bent and causing the issues, I may be able to fix it a bit, the switch on the handlebar is a std. CEV that os for high / low and horn.

I hate electrical, sorting out old bodges is not fun
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Offline Canuck750

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Re: 1948 Airone - restoration
« Reply #179 on: December 14, 2021, 07:45:15 PM »
I had previously opened up the original horn, cleaned and tested it and gave it a coat of paint. On the bike and with the switch hooked up it worked (poorly) for a few minutes until the 'smoke came out'. I opened up the horn and it looks like the solenoid windings had shorted out, damn!

I removed the guts, drilled out the magnet riverts (4) and had a bare shell



and then remembered I had bought a couple 6V horns off Ebay (India) advertized as being a Vespa replacement, they cost about $15 a pop. The horn looks like it would drop right into the Magneti Marelli horn shell, and like it as meant to be the new 6V horn fits perfectly.



I cleaned off the paint from the original shell parts and made a new bracket to hold the horn insert from 16 gauge stainless sheet, some folds in the bench vise and drilled some holes



Then I powder coated semi gloss black the original shell parts and the new bracket, I used new aluminum dome head rivets to mount the new bracket to the shell using the original horn magnet mount points



I wound in some metric machine screws to fill the holes in the back of the case where original screw mounts were fitted then cut off the ends of the protruding studs

The original exterior bakelite wire terminal was reused, I connected wires from the horn insert to the bakelite base inside the horn



Two self taping screws retain the horn insert to the new bracket, then the origianl outer louvered cap was bolted back on



and from the back side it looks pretty much like a new stock Magneti Marelli horn



It took an afternoon but for under $20 I have a fully functioning 6V horn with a nice annoying sound and it looks stock, pretty happy with how this turned out



48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli 200 sprite, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106 SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500


Harper's Moto Guzzi : Go Ride , Break Parts, Call me!
Harper's Moto Guzzi. Where we still answer the phone, use the highest quality parts, and also do Transmission, rear drive, and carb rebuilds fast. Call us at 816.697.3411 and get your problems resolved.
http://www.harpermoto.com
Advertise Here
 


Harper's Moto Guzzi : Go Ride , Break Parts, Call me!
Harper's Moto Guzzi. Where we still answer the phone, use the highest quality parts, and also do Transmission, rear drive, and carb rebuilds fast. Call us at 816.697.3411 and get your problems resolved.
http://www.harpermoto.com
Advertise Here