Author Topic: V85 TT Merged Threadfest  (Read 333886 times)

Online blu guzz

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2670 on: February 26, 2023, 07:52:47 AM »
I am going to give you my experience from the practical first than the passion.
Practical:
You have listed most of the usual suspects when it comes to competition except many look at KTM as well.  But for me, one point stands out.  Other than the Suzuki and Kawi (don't know the prices, just assuming they are high value), the MG bikes are far less expensive than the euro competition you mentioned. They all also have much larger engines. Price and size wise, the Rotax derived Beemers are closer natural competitors for the V85 although still more money when bags and other accessories are needed (no cruise control) and chain drive of course.
I bought one of the very first in summer of 19.  It is a euro 4 model so a little different than what you would get and I have tubes unfortunately.  But, I just did the 24,000 mile oil change yesterday and so far, it has been Asian like in its reliability.  There is a lower right side bash plate/exhaust cover that has vibrated itself to where I have had to repair it, that's it.  Also, unlike every Beemer I owned, it doesn't need an aftermarket seat and suspension (easily $2,000 saved).  All I have put on it is the tall Calsci tall screen and hand grip extenders for cold riding.  Tires last about 9,000 miles for me which is 50% longer than any other bike I ever owned. Wheels are super easy to unmount and remount, I walk them into the dealer for tires.
From the heart:
You will never ride another bike with the unique feel of this one unless it is another Guzzi.  This is why you have to take a long test ride.  I don't know if it is a special balance because of the engine configuration or some other reason, but for me, it just feels right.  When you are slicing through turns, it is so neutral and light as to almost anticipate what your want to do next. Along with that is the seemingly perfect amount of torque as long as you are 3,000 rpm or up, 4,000 and up is downright exciting and 5,000 and up you better have your head in the game. You may catch your inner bad boy trying to come out and play.  The V is very smooth with just enough vibe to let you know you are not riding an electric bike, but not bothersome at all.  While the looks could be considered controversial, it always gets compliments and this is personal to me, I never considered this adventure style in all my years of riding because I am vain about my bikes and could not stand to be seen on any of those others (my Beemers were always faired bikes).
Summary: 
I think you would like the bike, but we are all different.  If any of you are fans of the looks of the other bikes I mentioned, no offense was intended. Let us know what you do.
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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2671 on: February 26, 2023, 08:21:09 AM »
I bought mine July 2019.  My list of desired parameters: 500 lbs curb weight, less than 1000 cc, air cooled, twin engine, shaft drive, 19 inch front wheel, easy maintenance, not too cluttered with electronics, good value for price, light steering, adventure bike with relatively long suspension travel and decent ground
clearance &  able to ride 8 hour days.   Put those down on paper and there was one choice.  After owning the V 85 the cruise control has been a game changer.  The only downside was tubed wheels which I rectified when I purchased new tubeless wheels.  My only prior Italian bike was a Ducati 900 SS and it is a joy once again to walk out into the shop and see this beauty sitting there, my only subjective comment regarding this motorcycle. 

I read somewhere on this forum at some point over the last 4 years:  Test ride a Moto Guzzi for 30 minutes and you'll never own one.  Ride one for a month and you will never own anything else.  Not sure I totally agree with that because I was pretty smitten within the first 10 minutes of my test ride which I promptly came back from and purchased the bike.  Point being that MG's have something special that takes awhile to fully appreciate.

Buy the V 85 now, and when you are deciding what may be your perfect ride,  you may very well discover after a year or less that in fact you have already found it.


Offline Dave Swanson

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2672 on: February 26, 2023, 10:13:59 AM »

Buy the V 85 now, and when you are deciding what may be your perfect ride,  you may very well discover after a year or less that in fact you have already found it.

That's a great way of stating it.  The V85 is a special bike. 
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Offline Trialsman

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2673 on: February 26, 2023, 11:01:58 AM »
I knew this concept bike would suite me if they ever built it.  I followed the progress and put a deposit on one before you were supposed to do so.  I flew from Pgh to N. Carolina and picked up one of the first ones in the country to ride home.  My background included the Honda ST1300, KTM 990, BMW K1200, RS1200GS, and F800 GSA.  All were very good bikes, but the V85 did everything really well - not perfect, but really well.  It's seating is relatively low and comfortable for longer trips.  Weight is not a feather, but feels good with the low center.  Handling is very precise and the power is very adequate as a solo rider.  I rode across Canada with it as well as rocky mountain passes in Colorado. Since then, I have given it to my son (who loves it) and bought the Centenario from Cadre in Ohio.  It is about three hundred miles away but he is an excellent dealer and, to tell the truth, the bike just doesn't need anything.  My younger son also has a Centenario. I have made some personal changes, as did Huzo, and as we all tend to do.  My new bike has been across country to ride the Top of the Rockies rally and is very much at home on the mountain roads as well as the highway.  It is my "go to" bike for everything but serious off road where I will ride the 570 Berg or my Alta.  You can wait and search for the perfect bike and you will still be waiting and searching years from now.  This bike is the most pleasant bike I have ever ridden.  As for the looks, paint and a little thought can make a world of difference.




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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2673 on: February 26, 2023, 11:01:58 AM »

Offline VStarRider

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2674 on: February 26, 2023, 01:55:23 PM »
I knew this concept bike would suite me if they ever built it.  I followed the progress and put a deposit on one before you were supposed to do so.  I flew from Pgh to N. Carolina and picked up one of the first ones in the country to ride home.  My background included the Honda ST1300, KTM 990, BMW K1200, RS1200GS, and F800 GSA.  All were very good bikes, but the V85 did everything really well - not perfect, but really well.  It's seating is relatively low and comfortable for longer trips.  Weight is not a feather, but feels good with the low center.  Handling is very precise and the power is very adequate as a solo rider.  I rode across Canada with it as well as rocky mountain passes in Colorado. Since then, I have given it to my son (who loves it) and bought the Centenario from Cadre in Ohio.  It is about three hundred miles away but he is an excellent dealer and, to tell the truth, the bike just doesn't need anything.  My younger son also has a Centenario. I have made some personal changes, as did Huzo, and as we all tend to do.  My new bike has been across country to ride the Top of the Rockies rally and is very much at home on the mountain roads as well as the highway.  It is my "go to" bike for everything but serious off road where I will ride the 570 Berg or my Alta.  You can wait and search for the perfect bike and you will still be waiting and searching years from now.  This bike is the most pleasant bike I have ever ridden.  As for the looks, paint and a little thought can make a world of difference.

Love your color, especially the seat, which is why the Centenario is my first choice.  I would want fog lights, center stand, heated grips too. 

I notice you said seating is relatively low. My Himalayan, with a Seat Concepts tall seat, is about 32.5-33", similar to V85TT.  That bike fits me very well, one of the most natural seating positions on a machine I've experienced.  I checked on cycle-ergo.com and the V85 looks good.  No Himalayan to compare it, but much better seating position than my Wing (see pics - assuming they load).





« Last Edit: February 26, 2023, 01:56:50 PM by VStarRider »

Offline Bulldog9

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2675 on: February 26, 2023, 02:02:48 PM »
I must admit that initially, the V85 did not appeal to me visually. Hence the Stornello TT.  I put in new fork Springs. 420MM rear shocks that resulted in a 1.5" static lift (3/4" seated), a custom mount for bags on both sides, crash bars, the Multimedia module and a bunc of other stuff to include a raised seat on my Stornello. It has so far been a very capable alternative.  But DAG NAB IT..... The 2023 is showing a Blue/White with red frame that is calling to me.............
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Online Huzo

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Re: V85 touring impressions
« Reply #2676 on: February 26, 2023, 02:50:40 PM »
Bumped for VStarRider
There are some good impressions here from several riders.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2023, 02:53:00 PM by Huzo »

Online Huzo

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2677 on: February 26, 2023, 02:57:20 PM »
Love your color, especially the seat, which is why the Centenario is my first choice.  I would want fog lights, center stand, heated grips too. 

I notice you said seating is relatively low. My Himalayan, with a Seat Concepts tall seat, is about 32.5-33", similar to V85TT.  That bike fits me very well, one of the most natural seating positions on a machine I've experienced.  I checked on cycle-ergo.com and the V85 looks good.  No Himalayan to compare it, but much better seating position than my Wing (see pics - assuming they load).






One of the things I did to mine that actually matter IMO, is the replacement of the unnecessarily heavy throttle pull with a much lighter one.
I have a second one if it becomes an issue.

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2678 on: February 26, 2023, 03:00:04 PM »
I never even gave a new MG a passing thought until I saw your pictures Peter.  Now I want one just like that. The red really pops.
I really do think itís the wheels that give it the spark.
One day Iíll take the motor out and have the black dry ice blasted off and redone in silver like the GS Beemers.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2023, 03:01:47 PM by Huzo »

Offline usedtobefast

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2679 on: February 26, 2023, 03:54:03 PM »
Thank you again for all of the replies.  This is helpful.

For some context, here are bikes on my short list for context with reasons why and (why not):

1. V85TT - shaft drive, mid-sized engine, cruise, cruising range, easy to maintain, lightweight, unique style, LED lighting, simple electronics, tubeless tires, 2 year warranty (dealer network, parts availability, resale value/ability to resell)
2. VStrom 1050 - decent dealer network (three in my region), simple electronics, cruise, cast wheels, lots of aftermarket support, great V-twin engine (chain drive, a little boring, hard to service)
3. Tiger 1200 GT Explorer - shaft drive, 3 year warranty, great seat height, cruise, cruising range, cast wheels, dealer in town(might be too tall, expensive, high depreciation, don't like 270 degree triple, complicated electronics)
4. Versys 1000 - unique 4 cylinder, great handling, good seating position, cheap used (chain drive, poor shifter feel, a little heavy, hard to service)
5. GS1250 - shaft drive, 3 year warranty, cruise, cruising range, tubeless tires, lots of aftermarket support (expensive to maintain, no dealer nearby, complicated electronics, not unique)

A few thoughts on your list ...
The V-Strom ... FYI, it has cornering ABS (I have one and notice zero difference between cornering ABS vs normal ABS), and the "little boring" part, have you ridden one?  It has much more power than the V85TT and I actually like it better than the R1200GS (have not tried a 1250).  I once rode the V-Strom to a BMW dealership to test drive a 1200GS, rode the GS around for ~30 minutes, not really impressed, got back on my V-Strom and really liked it much better.  A valve clearance adjustment is a big chore though, a clearance check is a decent pain as well.

OK, getting into the GS now, as you know, TONS of money.  TONS of "features" if you are in to that kind of thing.  For a gadget needing type, I guess I could see the attraction.  While I was at the dealer a guy was getting the "new bike intro" talk with a service guy, 99% of the talk was "and to pair your bluetooth to the GPS ... and to the Cardo... "  "and for android auto you can ..." ... "and to turn on the heated grips, you go into this menu, under this, and then ....", whew!   :grin:   Then you got the suspension, and auto preload setting (which, actually, is really cool if you switch how you ride (like no load, fully loaded for trip, light load with passenger, etc)), and power modes, and suspension modes, I bet you could spend an hour of each trip just making adjustments.   :laugh:

The Tiger ... isn't it a really heavy bike?  Maybe that was the previous 1200, not sure.  Just thought those were piggie. 

The Versys ... double check the first year for cruise control, they did not add that until further along in the model years.  I think they make a decent street bike, but not light, and really zero dirt road ability.

The V85TT (have done 2 test rides, never owned one) seems lighter and more nimble than my V-Strom, easier rolling in/out of a garage, etc.  The airflow on the V-Strom is much better, but as you've mentioned seems plenty of options for V85TT windshields.  Just knocking out highway miles seems much easier on the V-Strom (smoother, more reserve power, lazier and more relaxed at higher speeds).  Twisty backroads are fun on both, V85 handles a bit better, the V-Strom romps out of turns and smoother engine is more fun (to me).  I do like the idea of the shaftdrive ... some people get a chain drive bike and kind of ignore the chain on a trip, I tend to want to oil a chain at the end of each rainy day and if all dry, maybe each third day.

I was going to buy a V85TT, had a deposit on one when they first came out, but in my area in CA, the OTD price was $16,500 and I just could not do that.
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Offline DoubleThumper

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Re: V85TT Fuel Octane
« Reply #2680 on: February 26, 2023, 07:25:04 PM »
Thanks everyone for your input. It almost seems like I posted an oil thread from the range of opinions!

Tusayan, I like your philosophy, use the lowest octane that doesnít ping. It makes sense. I don't want to have to be using premium if I don't have to. Especially at today's prices.

Yes, nothing worse than buying even more expensive gasoline.

Hello sir KiowaEagle:

Did you determine which octane rating worked for you best, particularly for summer riding?

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Re: V85 touring impressions
« Reply #2681 on: February 26, 2023, 08:32:09 PM »
Since getting my V85TT I've never even thought of the Norge I sold to get it.
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Offline twowheeladdict

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Re: V85TT Fuel Octane
« Reply #2682 on: February 26, 2023, 09:33:30 PM »
It depends on where and how you ride.

I put my bikes away topped with 93 octane non ethanol fuel from the country station 1/2 mile from my house.

If on a long ride and can only get 10%, I will top the bike up with 87 octane when I am at 1/2 a tank. I figure I know have 5% octane and 90 octane fuel.

If that doesnít get me home I fill with juice st enjoy IHG to get me home of top tier 93 octane 10% ethanol.
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Offline Trialsman

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Re: V85 touring impressions
« Reply #2683 on: February 26, 2023, 10:12:37 PM »
I think about my Norge once and awhile.  It was a beautiful bike and I had a lot of adventures all over the country with it.  My thoughts tend to lean towards the many new adventures Luis will be having with it.  As for me, my second V85 points to my commitment and the bike I really love.
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Online Huzo

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Re: V85 touring impressions
« Reply #2684 on: February 26, 2023, 11:13:48 PM »
I would like to get my Norge to 300,000.
Iíll stay off the V85 a bit more to try to achieve that.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2023, 11:14:50 PM by Huzo »

Online Bpreynolds2

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Re: V85 TT Merged Threadfest
« Reply #2685 on: February 27, 2023, 07:05:07 AM »
Guess Iím likely here just trying to get folks to talk me into this, mostly.  Iím going to be buying a new bike in the next week or week and a half.  The specials Guzzi are running on the Ď22 V85TT right now are almost too good to pass up and I still think they are gorgeous machines.  This being said, 2 weeks ago I got a test ride on one locally and while I liked the bike very much and was in admiration of how far Guzzi has come even just in the years Iíve been riding (2004), there were a few niggles for me personally which I think, maybe, could be chalked up to the bike I was riding only having about 150 miles on it.  Iíve had many, many motorcycles and driven many, many thousands upon thousands of miles, had nearly every iteration of Geese since 2004, etc. so Iím an older rider but with a firm belief that what I was experiencing was real to me in the moment and on that specific bike, and more so than on most other MGs Iíve ridden.  Iíd appreciate some input.  I do maybe think all of these could be merely chalked up to it being so new with motor, gearbox, etc. still just tight.

1) Shifting was incredibly notchy.  Many false neutrals.  At least twice I had pull in the clutch at a light and roll the bike to get it to go into/out of gears.  Several times it took significant foot work to get the gear engaged and so forth.  It was a bit odd.

2) Iím about 160lbs but on the highway at 75 the engine felt busy.  Some folks are going to call BS on me for saying this but seriously, a former and much beloved Roamer felt more at ease on the highway at those speeds.  But again, the Roamer was well broken in, and the Roamer is also considerably less weight than the V85, soÖGuess Iím just saying Iím used to most Guzzis being nearly silly calm at 75, even the small blocks.

3) I was a ďlittleĒ surprised to see the bike only returning (if you believe the dash) about 42-44mpg at 75 or so.  Thatís not bad but compared to other modern bikes, especially and obviously the big bore machines, itís not so great.  Shoot, the 1290 SDR I had got around 48-50mpg on the highway at those speeds.  I would expect the mpg to drop on the V85 at higher speeds, just maybe had hoped for at 45-50 at 75 or slightly plus.  Not a big deal, just saying.

And yes, I know all of the above will/can improve as the engine and everything gets broken in but just asking for input here. 

I will also say here that in nearly every other aspect of the ride the machine greatly pleased me.  I say again, what a long way MG has come. 
« Last Edit: February 27, 2023, 07:24:00 AM by Bpreynolds2 »
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Offline KiowaEagle

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Re: V85TT Fuel Octane
« Reply #2686 on: February 27, 2023, 07:45:06 AM »
Yes, nothing worse than buying even more expensive gasoline.

Hello sir KiowaEagle:

Did you determine which octane rating worked for you best, particularly for summer riding?

DT I've been using 91 octane minimum and sometimes 93. I haven't had any knocking or pinging even with 87 but the bike does seem to run better with the higher octane so that makes it worth the money for me.
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Offline aproud1

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Re: V85 TT Merged Threadfest
« Reply #2687 on: February 27, 2023, 07:45:54 AM »

1) Shifting was incredibly notchy.  Many false neutrals.  At least twice I had pull in the clutch at a light and roll the bike to get it to go into/out of gears.  Several times it took significant foot work to get the gear engaged and so forth.  It was a bit odd.

2) I’m about 160lbs but on the highway at 75 the engine felt busy.  Some folks are going to call BS on me for saying this but seriously, a former and much beloved Roamer felt more at ease on the highway at those speeds.  But again, the Roamer was well broken in, and the Roamer is also considerably less weight than the V85, so…Guess I’m just saying I’m used to most Guzzis being nearly silly calm at 75, even the small blocks.

3) I was a “little” surprised to see the bike only returning (if you believe the dash) about 42-44mpg at 75 or so.  That’s not bad but compared to other modern bikes, especially and obviously the big bore machines, it’s not so great.  Shoot, the 1290 SDR I had got around 48-50mpg on the highway at those speeds.  I would expect the mpg to drop on the V85 at higher speeds, just maybe had hoped for at 45-50 at 75 or slightly plus.  Not a big deal, just saying.

And yes, I know all of the above will/can improve as the engine and everything gets broken in but just asking for input here. 

I will also say here that in nearly every other aspect of the ride the machine greatly pleased me.  I say again, what a long way MG has come.

Well I sure hope we can talk you into this!

Shifting improved dramatically on my V7 and to a lesser degree on my V85TT. The V85 was always a little smoother and much easier to find neutral. Also took a minute for me to adjust to the right gear angle on my V7 and I had shifting issues due to that as well.

I felt the same way about the V85 on the highway. It will happily run those speeds all day long. Once you get up to around 85 there isn't much more to give.

I put 6000 miles on my V85tt, I generally averaged 48 MPG. I'm a large dude and I usually rode with the side panniers. I could do a little better if I completely avoided the highway.

I generally enjoyed my time on the V85. Mine was a Euro 4 and had a lot of loose bits and some ECU weirdness. Sounds like the Euor5's are a little more stable. Not to mention there is a little more grunt down low. Totaled my last bike last August and the current Guzzi line up are all on my radar for when I can ride again. If that says anything?

Best of luck on your new decision.

« Last Edit: February 27, 2023, 07:46:40 AM by aproud1 »

Offline kingoffleece

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Re: V85 TT Merged Threadfest
« Reply #2688 on: February 27, 2023, 08:10:42 AM »
My 2022 V85 was almost the same with the gearbox at new.  After a few thousand K it' loosened up a lot-a LOT.
Over 70 per on the highway the indicated mpg does drop a noticeable bit-at over 80 it's in the low to mid 20's.  At 70 to 75 mid 40's or so.

I'm not sorry I have it-it's my 4th Guzzi and they've all been great.  Only one left in the fleet as we massively downsized to an impossibly small garage with house and only room for one now, or I'd still have them ALL!
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Offline Clifton

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Re: V85 TT Merged Threadfest
« Reply #2689 on: February 27, 2023, 09:00:05 AM »

...1) Shifting was incredibly notchy.  Many false neutrals.  At least twice I had pull in the clutch at a light and roll the bike to get it to go into/out of gears.  Several times it took significant foot work to get the gear engaged and so forth.  It was a bit odd.

2) Iím about 160lbs but on the highway at 75 the engine felt busy.  Some folks are going to call BS on me for saying this but seriously, a former and much beloved Roamer felt more at ease on the highway at those speeds.  But again, the Roamer was well broken in, and the Roamer is also considerably less weight than the V85, soÖGuess Iím just saying Iím used to most Guzzis being nearly silly calm at 75, even the small blocks.

3) I was a ďlittleĒ surprised to see the bike only returning (if you believe the dash) about 42-44mpg at 75 or so.  Thatís not bad but compared to other modern bikes,

It sounds almost like the clutch is out of adjustment, or you're not used to how a transmission engages gears with a dry clutch? If so you will quickly get accustomed. From neutral with clutch out pull in the clutch and immediately press lightly for 1st before the turning gears have a chance to come to a complete stop. Stopped, in neutral with clutch in, if a light pressure doesn't click in to 1st release the clutch just slightly to turn the gear as you lightly press down.

Again you'll get used to 75 mph on this bike. It's what around 5,000 rpm at that speed? Right where this little V-twin is happy and smooth.

Once broken in you should get mid 40's at 75 mph unless loaded down with panniers which should drop to 40 or low 40's.
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Re: V85 TT Merged Threadfest
« Reply #2690 on: February 27, 2023, 10:29:35 AM »
BP.

I think that particular bike must have had an issue with the shifting. Hopefully just adjustment.  I am often surprised at how some dealers let the bikes out for test rides, out of adjustment, tire pressure off.  So many things that are unforced errors that cost sales.
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Offline Clifton

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Re: V85 TT Merged Threadfest
« Reply #2691 on: February 27, 2023, 10:43:17 AM »
BP.

..... I am often surprised at how some dealers let the bikes out for test rides, out of adjustment, tire pressure off.  So many things that are unforced errors that cost sales.

A friend test rode a Honda NC700 DCT. The dealer said they normally didn't permit test rides but since the bike was a 2 year old leftover and he really wanted to sell it he let him ride it but just in the parking lot. It was important for my friend because he'd never tried a DCT. Anyway he saw them connect the battery and plug it to a tender while he got his helmet. 20 minutes later they rolled it out, started it, and showed him how the transmission worked. He said he rode it across the lot but then could hardly turn it so rode it back saying he didn't like how it was so heavy steering. Turned out the tires had no air pressure! The gauge didn't even register 5psi.
After puffing up the tires it handled like it should and he bought it.
21 V85TT
14 California Custom
21 Tenere' 700
20 XT250
14 CB1100
93 R100R

Offline VStarRider

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2692 on: February 27, 2023, 06:09:44 PM »
A few thoughts on your list ...
The V-Strom ... FYI, it has cornering ABS (I have one and notice zero difference between cornering ABS vs normal ABS), and the "little boring" part, have you ridden one?  It has much more power than the V85TT and I actually like it better than the R1200GS (have not tried a 1250).  I once rode the V-Strom to a BMW dealership to test drive a 1200GS, rode the GS around for ~30 minutes, not really impressed, got back on my V-Strom and really liked it much better.  A valve clearance adjustment is a big chore though, a clearance check is a decent pain as well.

OK, getting into the GS now, as you know, TONS of money.  TONS of "features" if you are in to that kind of thing.  For a gadget needing type, I guess I could see the attraction.  While I was at the dealer a guy was getting the "new bike intro" talk with a service guy, 99% of the talk was "and to pair your bluetooth to the GPS ... and to the Cardo... "  "and for android auto you can ..." ... "and to turn on the heated grips, you go into this menu, under this, and then ....", whew!   :grin:   Then you got the suspension, and auto preload setting (which, actually, is really cool if you switch how you ride (like no load, fully loaded for trip, light load with passenger, etc)), and power modes, and suspension modes, I bet you could spend an hour of each trip just making adjustments.   :laugh:

The Tiger ... isn't it a really heavy bike?  Maybe that was the previous 1200, not sure.  Just thought those were piggie. 

The Versys ... double check the first year for cruise control, they did not add that until further along in the model years.  I think they make a decent street bike, but not light, and really zero dirt road ability.

The V85TT (have done 2 test rides, never owned one) seems lighter and more nimble than my V-Strom, easier rolling in/out of a garage, etc.  The airflow on the V-Strom is much better, but as you've mentioned seems plenty of options for V85TT windshields.  Just knocking out highway miles seems much easier on the V-Strom (smoother, more reserve power, lazier and more relaxed at higher speeds).  Twisty backroads are fun on both, V85 handles a bit better, the V-Strom romps out of turns and smoother engine is more fun (to me).  I do like the idea of the shaftdrive ... some people get a chain drive bike and kind of ignore the chain on a trip, I tend to want to oil a chain at the end of each rainy day and if all dry, maybe each third day.

I was going to buy a V85TT, had a deposit on one when they first came out, but in my area in CA, the OTD price was $16,500 and I just could not do that.

No, I haven't, but I wish I had chosen a different term.  Maybe "generic"?  I was referring to looks, not performance, in my post. However, the 2023 models look pretty good, particularly the matte gray with red accent cast wheels.  I am glad to read your report - affirms the V's #2 place on my list.

Newer Tigers are lighter - but I don't like the engine sound.

---------------------------

I have watched at least 20 videos on the V85.  The common thread among comments is uniqueness, simplicity, good handling, easy to maintain, good but not great power, and once you have one, you will love it.

From what I have seen, I like the sound, looks, maintenance, character, features for the price.  I like character in bikes.  My REs have character.  Gold Wing?  Not so much.



Offline VStarRider

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Re: Considering a V85TT
« Reply #2693 on: February 27, 2023, 06:12:26 PM »
....I have to admit I like the support shown on this forum.  One of the worries of owning an uncommon bike is help when you need it.  Just a few days on this forum and it's apparent there is an MG community out there.  I see those suggesting sharing trip routes in the event of trouble along the way so a member can help.  I see forum members that appear to know each other well.  I like it. 

Offline VStarRider

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Re: V85 touring impressions
« Reply #2694 on: February 27, 2023, 06:37:57 PM »
Bumped for VStarRider
There are some good impressions here from several riders.

Thank you!! Found it!

Online Sykestone8886

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Re: V85 touring impressions (MERGED)
« Reply #2695 on: February 27, 2023, 07:51:51 PM »
VStarRider I replied to your PM , let me know if you got it.
54HDFL  73HDFLH. 85HDFLT. 73suzukiTS 250 76hHONDA cb360

Offline noamlu

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v85TT horn replacement
« Reply #2696 on: February 28, 2023, 03:27:44 AM »
Hi,
A friend is considering replacing the OEM horn, with two air horns. The replacement horn is supplied with it's own wiring harness for both the low current(switch) circuit and high current circuit which are of course connected to both sides of a relay, I don't know the current which the horn draws but A 30A relay is supplied and the gauge of the high current wire is 59 in. The low current side(i.e the one wired to the supplied button) uses a 119in wire. What if instead of using the supplied button we wire it to the OEM switch coming from the handelbar? What concerns me is that I don't know what current flows in the original low current side, and also concerned about the increased voltage drop when using two much more powerful horns, any advice?

Offline Kildareman

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Re: v85TT horn replacement
« Reply #2697 on: February 28, 2023, 05:27:50 AM »
Hi,
A friend is considering replacing the OEM horn, with two air horns. The replacement horn is supplied with it's own wiring harness for both the low current(switch) circuit and high current circuit which are of course connected to both sides of a relay, I don't know the current which the horn draws but A 30A relay is supplied and the gauge of the high current wire is 59 in. The low current side(i.e the one wired to the supplied button) uses a 119in wire. What if instead of using the supplied button we wire it to the OEM switch coming from the handelbar? What concerns me is that I don't know what current flows in the original low current side, and also concerned about the increased voltage drop when using two much more powerful horns, any advice?

I've always used the original horn button/switch as it's the low current side of the relay and will be no different than a supplied switch - you are just allowing current to flow through the relay coil to pull the high current side in.  The V85 has plenty of power in reserve to handle extra load.
V7 850 Centenario

Online brother dave

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Re: V85 touring impressions
« Reply #2698 on: February 28, 2023, 07:45:09 AM »
As I have often said, the V85 does nothing 100%.........but it does do everything 90-95% !!!
Perfect is the enemy of good enough. I ride my ď90%Ē V85 and donít worry about that lat 10%Ö.
2007 California Vintage (left the nest)
2018 V7 III Special
2021 V85 Centenario

Offline kingoffleece

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Re: V85 touring impressions (MERGED)
« Reply #2699 on: February 28, 2023, 08:07:22 AM »
That, sir, sums it up quite well.  Quite well indeed.
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