Author Topic: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)  (Read 4041 times)

Offline twowings

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #60 on: August 27, 2021, 05:45:31 PM »
Are the horns on a custom bracket?

Can't wait to see the console nighttime shot!  :bow:
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Moto Guzzi - 100 Anni Di Autentica Passione

Online berniebee

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #61 on: August 28, 2021, 10:49:43 PM »
Funny you should ask, because I'm not happy with the mounting situation. The Two Fiam horns each came with a flat steel mounting strip, holes drilled at each end.



 

The idea being the stud on the back of the horn goes through one hole of the strip, secured by the supplied nut and you mount the other end of the strip to your car or bike. I have both strips mounted to a single tab on the frame with a single bolt through both strips. Not the best, because there is nothing to keep the strips from swinging around the mounting bolt except the friction of the tightened bolt. The two strips are horizontal, so the mass of the horns bouncing up and down will almost certainly work the strips loose. I may fab or modify something to make the horn mounts a bit more secure. Maybe swing the strips down a little to form an upside down "vee" and then bolt a fabbed third strip to the two horn studs to make a steel strip triangle.

Or maybe chuck the original mounting strips and use clamps like this one, around the frame's cross tube.






« Last Edit: August 28, 2021, 10:59:35 PM by berniebee »

Online Canuck750

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #62 on: September 05, 2021, 07:18:18 PM »
Real nice workmanship! looking forward to seeing the bike back together. :thumb:
48 Guzzi Airone, 57 Guzzi Cardellino, 65 Benelli Barracuda, 66 Aermacchi Sprint, 68 Gilera 106SS, 72 Eldorado, 72 Benelli 180, 74 Guzzi 750S, 73 Laverda SF1, 74  Benelli 650S, 75 Ducati 860GT, 75 Moto Morini 3-1/2, 78 Moto Morinii 500

Online Michael Moore

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #63 on: September 05, 2021, 09:12:49 PM »
FYI, if you ever need to look for those kinds of clamps, they are called Adel (aka ms21919) clamps.  Aircraft Spruce is a good source for them.

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #63 on: September 05, 2021, 09:12:49 PM »

Online berniebee

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #64 on: September 07, 2021, 11:09:36 PM »
FYI, if you ever need to look for those kinds of clamps, they are called Adel (aka ms21919) clamps.  Aircraft Spruce is a good source for them.

Thanks, I'll check them out.

Online berniebee

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #65 on: September 08, 2021, 01:14:24 AM »
The wiring is done and tested. I found only a couple of goofs: I couldn't get the starter solenoid to clunk because I had installed the solenoid upside down! Took a bit of head scratching before I realized what the problem was. And because of a wiring change I mistakenly wired a ground to the horn relay coil instead of power.  Easy to spot and correct - and once done, the pair of horns startled me, they are SO loud. (A good thing.)

The bottom of the finished instrument panel: Though I use brown for all grounds, the sharp eyed will spot the black wire sneaking into the panel- it provides ground for four of the indicator lights.  The nine pin Molex connector fits into the original console hole after a little file work on the hole edges. The arcing black cable is part of odometer reset knob assembly. I drilled one exactly cable sized hole for the cable to enter and mate with the speedo reset mechanism and a second hole to match the location of the left hole in the mounting bracket. Though you can't tell in this pic the knob looks like it belongs there!



I used a non Guzzi fuse holder with modern blade style fuses.  The main relay supplies voltage to a single pole which feeds the six fuses. Fuse #6 isn't used right now, it's reserved for auxiliary stuff like a powering a cell phone. At the top right you can see the square black electronic load independent flasher relay. This type flasher will blink any type or number of bulbs at the same rate, so I need only the single unit to power my left /right turn signals or all four signals with the hazard switch. 



A slightly blurry photo with most of the instrument panel LEDs on: The camera doesn't quite capture the saturation of the colours, especially the red , which looks washed out in this pic.  The LED's colours are actually very intense and attractive.




« Last Edit: September 08, 2021, 01:17:15 AM by berniebee »

Online berniebee

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #66 on: September 11, 2021, 09:13:50 PM »
Bernie's budget beast boasts brakes! (Couldn't help myself.)

Man, I hate bleeding brakes. I always make a mess.
The front master cylinder and caliper was pretty straightforward- once I realized that the throttle assembly was preventing full swing of the brake lever:



Once the throttle was removed (Thankfully, the carburettors aren't installed yet.) it was easy peasy. Using the apply brake, loosen bleeder, tighten bleeder, release brake for a second and repeat method, I spilled only a few drops on the wheel rim and the floor when removing the bleed line at the caliper.

The integrated brake system was another story.
Using the same method, I bled the brake pressure regulator, the front caliper and then the rear caliper. Hung the front caliper way up so that it's brake line was sloped upwards to the caliper and had the bleed bottle on a ladder:



Detached the rear caliper and again oriented it to have the bubbles rise up to the bleed screw.



Got plenty of fluid through.
But the brake lever was spongy and worse, once I had it pumped up it would slowly sink under constant pressure.
Then I noticed a drip from the brake regulator. Removing the top rubber cover:



How did the circlip come loose?
I removed the regulator to find out what had happened. More drips from the disconnected brake lines.
I couldn't see anything wrong, so I decided to replace both internal o-rings. I carefully measured the groove diameters, ODs and the thickness of the o-rings, made a sketch of the dimensions, and then cleaned and bagged the relevant parts to bring to the parts counter of my friendly neighborhood bearing seller. They are always helpful, but it might be tough finding the correct size. Five minutes after entering the place, I had the 0-rings in my hands.  General Bearing Service in Ottawa is the best.

Reinstalled the regulator bled everything again and crap. The brake lever still fell with constant pressure. I've seen this before and it's always a bad master cylinder. Was the rebuild kit I used bad? Did I miss seeing a scratch in the master cylinder bore? It had been a long day, I was fed up, so I went on to the MG Cycle site and went to order a new master cylinder. Double crap. "This part is out of stock. We'll let you know when...".

The next day, I decided to bench test the master cylinder with an old brake line connected to it, pinched shut by locking pliers.



And it was fine!  WTF?

I researched a bit more- it looks like reverse bleeding could be the solution. Connect a syringe of brake fluid to each caliper in turn and bleed fluid out of the regulator bleed screw. But what a mess. Brake fluid dribbling out around the caliper bleeders, brake fluid sprayed because I forgot to release the syringe pressure before disconnecting it and holy cow, brake fluid overflowing out of the rear master cylinder!

Anyway, it worked. Let's just say my experience would have made a great advertisement for paper towels. And kitty litter.  The Guzzi can now stop. Hopefully soon, it will be able to go.




Thanks Charlie, (Antietam Classic Cycle) for the caliper pin!
 




« Last Edit: September 16, 2021, 07:52:36 AM by berniebee »

Online berniebee

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Re: Bernie's Budget Beast (SP1000)
« Reply #67 on: October 07, 2021, 05:22:17 PM »
Sometimes the simplest things end up taking the longest time.
The tach cable that came with the bike was too long- I tried routing it in different ways but to no avail.
I ordered a cable specified for the 850 T3 from MG cycle. The new cable was the same length as the one I had!

Online are a couple of videos showing how to shorten a tach/speedo cable and then stamping the end square using a press and a custom die, but I don't have a milling machine, so that was out.  Putting out a call to fellow WildGuzziers,  Ron (n3303j)  suggested to cut, silver solder the fresh end and file it square.

So I bought a couple of sticks of flux coated silver solder for $10 (A lifetime supply probably.)  and cut 2" off the inner and outer cable:



Set up the inner cable for soldering: (Cleaned it beforehand.)



And then managed to get an oversized blob of solder on the end. Thankfully it files fairly easily:




The "new" cable fits just right.




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Shipping in USA Only. Awesome quality. Back by popular demand. All proceeds go back into the forum.
http://www.wildguzzi.com/Products/products.htm
Advertise Here