General Category > Bike Builds, Rebuilds And Restorations Only

1967 V700 Corsa-Record

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cliffrod:
My projects are often drawn out, with necessary tangents and opportunities taking priority as they arise.  Here's a few details of parts chasing over the past year-

Guzzi offered no tachometer on the early Loop bikes.  There was no provision in the timing chest for a mechanical tach until the V7 Sport was released and the now familiar Moto Guzi black faced Veglia electronic tach had not yet been produced.  We studied pictures to decide the brand of tach used and then I determined the specifc model.  No speedometer was fitted. For the Record bikes, Tonti use an aftermarket VDO electric tachometer suitable for 6V or 12V and adjustable for use on 2, 4, 6 or 8 cylinder engines.    Apparently it was not a special or highly collectible tachometer.  This made finding one to be a challenge. 

After enough searching, one dealer was located in the Netherlands who searched his inventory of 1500+ gauges for approx 3 months to produce a single, almost correct NOS tach.  The Record bikes had tachs with a black trim ring, presumably to limit potential for glare when riding at high speed.   The NOS tach has a chrome trim ring, which I may leave as is or simply paint black.  During those three months of unknown results, I found another similar VDO tach.  It was/is well used and with the proper blacked-out trim ring, but has an adjustable rev limit pointer with corresponding penetration through the lens.  Not sure that it works, but having a one to service just in case was prudent.






Carbs

The original Record bikes were built to pursue top speed records.  both bikes were equipped with 38mm remote bowl Dellorto SS2 carbs on straightened intakes which point approximately straight towards the respective vertical frame members near the swing arm.  My bike did have both original 29mm SS1 carbs, which are tempting to run.  But, between their real world traffic manners and the fact that I'll upgrade to 750 cylinders during the mechanical rebuild, I'll likely change carbs.  I have an excellent pair of square slide 30mm VHB carbs, just like those on my V7 Sport, and this pair of 32mm PHB carbs, which would look a little more like the original SS2 carbs.

No decision has been made yet- maybe someone can offer feedback from experience, especially regarding changing carbs, intake configuration and adding custom headpipes with reverse cone megaphone exhaust all at once?





Tail light

A pet peeve with many customs is how often the details cheapen the end result.  Seeing another cheap no name aftermarket, Model A, HD limp dick or whatever dime a dozen tail light loses me.  This is an Italian bike.  It should have Italian parts.  One of my all time favorite tail lights that no one uses is the late 50's & early 60's CEV horizontal D tail light that came on bikes like the Ducati Elite and others. It's simply gorgeous.  This form apparently inspired many later bikes which feature a larger but similar horizontal D tail light.

This unit originally uses a pair of tiny 6v barrel bulbs, so I will have to upgrade the lamp assembly.  I sourced a pair of new tail light assemblies from Italy, which was more economical than buying a single $$$ one on eBay from here in the USA.   It will nestle nicely in a trimmed-out portion of the seat hump and be nice having a light with CEV and part numbers on the chrome bezel....  Very cool.  Not sure if this will also be the license plate mount I will use, but that would make sense.  Once this light, seat and rear fender are arranged and in place, I'll decide how short to cut the rear fender.




After assembling a pair of Tommaselli clip ons and matador levers to use (just because that would match my V7 Sport), I was able to identify and then source a pair of original style clip-ons using welded perches and parallel cable exit.  No pics since these bars haven't been ordered yet, but will be ordered with other needed parts directly from Italy as funds allow.

Mayor_of_BBQ:
Hey AC,

Was thinking about your project since seeing it at the Meltdown in may, and your progress by the time of the Guzzi lunch at Greenhouse....

You've got a huge tank there to work with, and judging from the seating position and intended use of the bike... it doesnt seem like you are going to need 4-5 gal of gas capacity for extended long tours or marathon rides (or endurance racing attempts  :evil:)

Since you are going the street-legal route, and will have a lot more electronic do-dads and wires and such than the original bikes...  it seems you could block out a 'false' section or box in the underside of the tank to stash that stuff along the frame tubes and hide it from view by fitting the tank over it to preserve the look of a race bike. Seems like 3 gallon tank capacity would be more than enough for this rig?

Just a thought, love this project, will be following

Chad

cliffrod:

--- Quote from: Mayor_of_BBQ on August 31, 2019, 11:05:25 AM ---Hey AC,

Was thinking about your project since seeing it at the Meltdown in may, and your progress by the time of the Guzzi lunch at Greenhouse....

You've got a huge tank there to work with, and judging from the seating position and intended use of the bike... it doesnt seem like you are going to need 4-5 gal of gas capacity for extended long tours or marathon rides (or endurance racing attempts  :evil:)

Since you are going the street-legal route, and will have a lot more electronic do-dads and wires and such than the original bikes...  it seems you could block out a 'false' section or box in the underside of the tank to stash that stuff along the frame tubes and hide it from view by fitting the tank over it to preserve the look of a race bike. Seems like 3 gallon tank capacity would be more than enough for this rig?

Just a thought, love this project, will be following

Chad

--- End quote ---

Ive tossed around that idea, Chad.  Installing baffles has also been discussed, maybe even with you (?). My CRS and ADD tendencies regularly fight for my full attention....

The one thing that I hate about riding an old Sportster with a stock tank like mine is going 40-50 miles and then knowing there better be gas nearby immediately or else. Even worse with a heavy throttle hand, hotter engine or both.  That XR1000 was good for about 30 miles on racing gas. On any significant ride going away from the shop,  someone had to follow with extra gas.  Not cool.  So I think I'm going to err on the side of too much tank and simply underfill it if it's an issue.  I don't ride just to ride much anymore.  Did that a lot long ago, now there's other responsibilities obligating me all the time.   

I do want to be able to ride this bike from here in Spartanburg to Knoxville area on this bike, which is around 200 miles depending upon specifics.    There's great roads between here & there that I've ridden & enjoyed for a long time on my Sport.  being able to go that distance with one tank, like I can on my Sport, sure beats the Sportster scenario.  The overall posture when on this bike is very close to my Sport, which should mean a comparable level of general comfort for such a distance in one bite- except for the thinner padding on the seat.

cliffrod:
This project is largely one of a predicated order.  Many of the specific details are dependent upon neighboring changes.    The more it was studied, the more clear it became where to begin.

As the build began, one of the first steps was to remove the front end tin.  The fork shrouds with headlight ears and  chrome spring covers crimped to the lowers were removed from the Record bikes.  Springs were left exposed, as was common on many Italian specials and race bikes, and the spring cups were retained.  Removing the tins facilitated use of clip-on handlebars.   I have always wanted a vintage Italian sporting bike with such exposed springs...

The lower or rear front fender mount was then rotated to be parallel to the fork lowers, a tab was added to each side and then bolted to the upper fender mount receiver.  This served as a simple fork brace. 

Both chrome covers are waiting to be removed and the fork brace to be finished.







I will retain the long headlight and fabricate mounts that look related to the great looking headlight ears found on the V7 Sport.  The larger headlight will house any necessary electrical components.

The V700 and Ambassador had similar but not identical top fork plates, triple tree, etc.  these were steel covered by the large alloy valance that houses the speedometer and warning lights.   Everything except the steel plate was missing from my bike.  It basically looked like this-



At this point,with the tank buck in place, it's obvious that this won't work.  So Tonti modified the steel top plate and made a simple aluminum valance to cover it.  The V700 front end/top plate has greater offset than later versions.  This creates a steeper front end and faster steering which is typically associated with sporting bikes. Jeff, the previously mentioned Record bike fan, modified a V700 offset top plate before learning Tonti used a later top plate with less offset- presumably for a longer wheelbase and greater top speed stability.  His build is more accurate than mine.  I planned to modify & use my original V700 parts.  But before I modified mine, he sent me his spare set.





Side by side, the difference between stock and modified is easy to see.  Now the two rear corners of the top plate easily clear the tank buck with steering at full lock.





This top plate was painted black on the Record bikes, as this one will be,


cliffrod:
After the modified top plate/ triple tree was in place, I began working on the tank.  Using pics of the unfaired bikes plus this image from the MG Museum of the existing original Record Bike with full fairing, I began-



 

At some point, I do plan to make a full fairing assembly like this one.  For now, that part of the project can wait.

Initially, a 2D chipboard cut-out was made from a beer case box for the seat to go with a simple plywood mock-up.




forum image hosting


Then I began wedging plastilina (non-hardening microcrystalline clay) onto a wooden armature to further develop the tank and seat in 3D.  Many will scan and use computer technology as a priority.  I like doing it myself. this is also how all my studio models are produced.





Working alone in studio can complicate one's ability to maintain perspective.  Without someone else's input for a sounding board, I've found it helps to have divergent projects working at the same time.  Time away from one helps clarify the other.  Over the winter and spring, the clay for tank and seat took shape very well.









Finally, I decided tank and seat clay models to be finished and it was time to begin work on fabricating the wooden bucks-





More soon...

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