Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

General Category => General Discussion => Topic started by: Lannis on January 14, 2019, 08:02:10 AM

Title: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Lannis on January 14, 2019, 08:02:10 AM
On another thread, a poster noted ...

"I live in the middle of nowhere which offers a lot of open-road riding. No stoplight-to-stoplight riding. No drag racing. Iím more a fan of bikes with bodywork. The whole naked bike thing doesnít really interest me...."

and immediately, flashbacks to last fall's cross-country trip (pleasant flashbacks) came to mind.

Out in the northern Midwest/West, the roads are laid out in big squares.   In some places the countryside is pretty flat, sometimes there are rolling hills (a little bit rolling).

Here at home in Virginia, we can go on any kind of day or weekend ride we like.   In a single day, we can ride from twisty mountain roads with 10-mph turns leading to broad vistas, then through rolling, smiling countryside, and then through flat marshes and swamps, and then up and down the sandy coastline, all in one day.   

A group of guys wanting to take a Sunday afternoon ride from where I live might ride 20 curving miles along the James River, then up onto the Blue Ridge Parkway, then over some 4000 foot mountains, and repeat going back home in the evening.

Out in "The Middle of Nowhere", so to speak, a 200 mile afternoon ride or day trip would mean:

1) Riding dead straight for 50 miles
2) Take a left turn
3) Ride dead straight for 50 miles
4) Take a left turn
5) Ride dead straight for 50 miles
6) Take a left turn
7) Ride dead straight for 50 miles and stop at the cafe where you started for a cup of coffee.

And that's in ANY direction you pick.   Corn fields and grain elevators and sugar beet fields are nice in their own way, but how do you get accustomed to all that for a weekend ride with your friends?   We talked about it and couldn't figure it out ....

Lannis
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Vince in Milwaukee on January 14, 2019, 08:34:15 AM
I live in the SE corner of Wisconsin, sandwiched between Milwaukee, WI and Chicago, IL.  Getting away for a short while is about 10 miles west of Lake Michigan.  It's mostly farm land laid out in a grid pattern - long, straight, and rather boring.  It's better than nothing, but becomes repetitious quickly.  If you go north or south, you get stuck in a big city with lots of people and the associated traffic.  I'm definitely not in the middle of nowhere, but getting away for a quick ride or a day trip pretty much sums up what Lannis is saying.  You just deal with it, I guess.     
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: gliderjohn on January 14, 2019, 08:41:22 AM
Guess it is what you get accustomed to. Living in Kansas one kind find roads with curves, although nothing like the Ozarks or Applicaiha. One learns to appreciate the sublime and subtle. I can ride from my place to Hays (about 200 miles) and the only curve I will see is the on ramp from !-135 to I-70. I can instead take blacktops and ride through numerous sweepers and hills, through a number of interesting little old towns and see some nice landscape and old stone buildings.
When I have been in W Virginia for example I soon grow tired of only seeing close ups of trees and blind curves. Straights are a welcome break. Give me the open sky!
GliderJohn
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Daniel Kalal on January 14, 2019, 08:50:15 AM
A group of guys wanting to take a Sunday afternoon ride...

I think it only points out how different we are even with our common interest of riding a Moto Guzzi.  Your approach of "a group of guys on an afternoon ride" is far removed from what interests me.  I almost never even start the engine without intending to be gone for at least three days--and always by myself.  I've ridden pretty much everywhere in this country (and enjoyed it all), but the expansiveness of the central plains will always have an attraction for me--straight lines or not.  Ride your ride.

(http://www.dankalal.net/2012trip13/photo025.JPG)
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: mjptexas on January 14, 2019, 08:55:45 AM
Depends on how you define the Middle of Nowhere.  This picture illustrates my definition. Middle of Nowhere is good for the soul:


(https://i.ibb.co/mJVjdgQ/CFDBC5-F5-6709-4265-8079-18-F2927053-EE.jpg) (https://ibb.co/mJVjdgQ)
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: acogoff on January 14, 2019, 09:05:03 AM
     In my area there are a few rivers and a slight curve every 10 miles and can be a bit boring if ripping around corners is your thing. There is something to be said about the skill required to not get nailed in the face by gravel truck debris of which there are as many trucks as cars on any given ride.  And having the knowledge to not even attempt to ride on a road with red river valley of the north gumbo soil on it during beet harvest when it is wet. Then there is the art of dodging the ever present deer. So I see a challenge no mater where you are riding.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: ken farr on January 14, 2019, 09:14:02 AM

(https://i.ibb.co/jfz2QVw/DSCF0164.jpg) (https://ibb.co/jfz2QVw)


I like the "ride your ride".

This was my middle of nowhere one summer, complete with ridiculous speed limit sign.

I may have exceeded it by a bit, I will turn myself in, soon.....

kjf
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: rocker59 on January 14, 2019, 09:14:19 AM
There is something quite peaceful and enjoyable about a day or two spent on The Great Plains (middle of "nowhere").

(https://photos.smugmug.com/Motorcycles/Summer-Running-2005/i-QGLL3rr/0/ab5e887a/M/Summer%20Running%20203-M.jpg)


Just like where I live in The Ozarks, there are towns with cafes and restaurants and museums, and points of interest along the way.  Plenty to see and do in Kansas, Western Oklahoma, West Texas, Eastern New Mexico, Eastern Colorado.

So, I'd imagine that people that live out there do the same things I do, when I get on a motorcycle:
1) Ride 50-100 miles.  Eat Lunch.  Ride 50-100 miles back home. 
2) Ride all day.  Check into a hotel.  Eat dinner.  Get up in the morning and repeat.


And the great thing is that there is never any traffic!!!

Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: oldbike54 on January 14, 2019, 09:17:44 AM
 Within 5 miles of the house there are two lane pig trails running through country that resembles Appalachia , some higher speed roads traversing that same geography , roads that are arrow straight and pool table flat going West . and very few LEO's . Beat that  :laugh:

 Ride in a place , not thru it .

 Dusty
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Toecutter on January 14, 2019, 09:27:55 AM
Up here, it all depends on the direction you pick and the route you pick to get there.

It can vary from "dead straight with nothing to see but sky and cars", to "endless S-curves through boreal forest", to "sand and dirt roads to crystal clear lakes", to "barely a cart path, ending in Nirvana" and everything in between (except mountains and coastlines... the best I can do in a day's ride is rolling hills). Mountains take two days to reach.

Northern SK is vastly different from Southern SK... the common "you can see your dog run away fro three days" trope is all Southern SK.

But yeah, there are definitely routes around here to numb the brain... those purely functional, straight, flat roads that never seem to end.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: not-fishing on January 14, 2019, 09:30:44 AM
There's lots of turns where I live but you also get:

(https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/20130205__congestion1.jpg?w=400)

(https://i1.wp.com/www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/sjm-congestion-1004-01.jpg?w=620&crop=0%2C0px%2C100%2C9999px)

I've been known to split lanes for miles of stop and go 15 mph traffic on a Sunday at 4 pm. 

Often the only time traffic is lite is at 2 am.  Of course it's going 90 to 100 mph with the occasional 55.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: brider on January 14, 2019, 09:37:00 AM

(http://www.dankalal.net/2012trip13/photo025.JPG)

I, too, miss and prefer this, for SOME of my riding. Lived in CT too long now, I am getting tired of limited vision because of the lack of straight roads and WAY too many trees (gonna get flamed for that, I'm sure).
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: nick949 on January 14, 2019, 10:04:11 AM
This is the Middle of Nowhere


(https://i.ibb.co/vznVKvb/nowhere.jpg) (https://ibb.co/vznVKvb)


This ain't (IMHO)


(https://i.ibb.co/BVSMPck/P5210135.jpg) (https://ibb.co/BVSMPck)


But everyone's tastes are different (even though they're wrong)  :grin:

Nick
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: wittangamo on January 14, 2019, 10:13:03 AM

(https://i.ibb.co/XCrRxRH/C0-ECC2-E8-CB69-4-A8-C-80-B3-1-D78-BB2788-E9.jpg) (https://ibb.co/XCrRxRH)
Lannis did a good job of counting our Virginia blessings.

I live just inside the Richmond city limits, but can go 20 minutes in any direction and get delightfully lost on winding two-lane roads with an endless variety of views. Rolling hills, mountains, rivers, lakes and the ocean are in easy day-tripping range. Historic sites and good eats abound. Traffic is rarely an issue if you avoid the interstates.

I make a 1,400-mile round trip to Indiana to visit family a couple of times a year. The first two-thirds through Virginia, West Virginia and the first part of Ohio is heavenly. My route passes through four national parks, several mountain ranges and some of the finest scenery imaginable.

Then it turns flat, straight and boring. Iíve tried alternate routes, but finally realized I might as well stick to the slab and get it over with. The only thing that keeps me awake is the rhythmic jarring of my spine on concrete expansion joints.

I know there are good people and interesting stopovers out there, and riding a bike is better than caging almost anywhere. But growing up and learning to ride in the Blue Ridge Mountains spoiled me.

I can eat a fast-food cheeseburger when I have to, but the best come off the grill in my own backyard. I hope everyone reading this feels the same about their home state.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: gliderjohn on January 14, 2019, 10:22:31 AM
A bit more of KS.

(https://i.ibb.co/ZNDLNsn/DSCN0199.jpg) (https://ibb.co/ZNDLNsn)


(https://i.ibb.co/5x0V3Wn/DSC06097.jpg) (https://ibb.co/5x0V3Wn)

Central KS can look a bit flat from the air.

(https://i.ibb.co/M6cJ2zw/DSCN0280.jpg) (https://ibb.co/M6cJ2zw)

2 stanza poems about life (https://poetandpoem.com/2-stanza)

GliderJohn
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: rocker59 on January 14, 2019, 10:48:34 AM

Lannis did a good job of counting our Virginia blessings.

 Traffic is rarely an issue if you avoid the interstates.


I spent quite a bit of time in Northern Virginia a dozen years ago.  I've also been to the MGNOC National in Buena Vista, and ridden a bit of BRP.  Beautiful country, to be sure, but Virginia has insanely low speed limits on secondary roads, as compared to States farther west.  And, "traffic" is a relative term.  I encountered more traffic than I'd like to see pretty much everywhere I rode.  I doubt I'll ever return there.  When I ride, I like to get away from crowds.


I make a 1,400-mile round trip to Indiana to visit family a couple of times a year. 

Then it turns flat, straight and boring. Iíve tried alternate routes, but finally realized I might as well stick to the slab and get it over with. 

I know there are good people and interesting stopovers out there, and riding a bike is better than caging almost anywhere. 


There is something meditative about a long strait 2-lane road and no traffic.  Running a tank of fuel through a bike and only enjoying the scenery.  I have to admit, that in my early sport-touring days, I (thought I) hated Oklahoma and Kansas.  Then, I began attending events in Oklahoma and Kansas.  And, riding to New Mexico and Colorado, which requires a long day to transit between The Ozarks and The Rockies.  It didn't take me long to become addicted.

Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Tom H on January 14, 2019, 11:04:40 AM
There's lots of turns where I live but you also get:

(https://www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/20130205__congestion1.jpg?w=400)

(https://i1.wp.com/www.mercurynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/sjm-congestion-1004-01.jpg?w=620&crop=0%2C0px%2C100%2C9999px)

I've been known to split lanes for miles of stop and go 15 mph traffic on a Sunday at 4 pm. 

Often the only time traffic is lite is at 2 am.  Of course it's going 90 to 100 mph with the occasional 55.

Looks like my area, the 405 most any time. I do envy you guys that can get out and go for a nice ride without being stuck in this stuff for miles. I used to go up to the Rock Store and ride the Malibu canyons to relax. Now it's too much stress getting there and back for the short time of relaxing.

Tom
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Chuck in Indiana on January 14, 2019, 12:31:12 PM
In my view, riding a moto   anywhere  can be a liberating relaxing, "get away thing".

Man and machine....connecti ng.

:-)

This. While "I've been everywhere, man.." here in flyover country I'll just take a bike out and enjoy operating the machine. Same with flying. By far most of my flying is from Point A to Point A.  :smiley: Just out converting hydrocarbons to noise and enjoying the moment.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Sheepdog on January 14, 2019, 02:14:23 PM
Like Pete Egan, I avoid the yellow parts of a road map. Unfamiliar urban riding always puts me on edge. I'll use an interstate when it doesn't make sense not to, but normally prefer US and state highways. Following rivers for a while always reduces the monotony...
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Lannis on January 14, 2019, 03:06:06 PM
I spent quite a bit of time in Northern Virginia a dozen years ago.  I've also been to the MGNOC National in Buena Vista, and ridden a bit of BRP. 

So, you've got some experience in riding about 10% of the state of Virginia!   What you need to consider is that if you draw a line from Winchester to Front Royal to Culpeper to Wilderness to Richmond to Suffolk, and eliminate everything north and east of that line when considering "uncrowded roads", and NEVER consider the BRP on weekends or leaf-peeper season, you'll know what I'm talking about.   

And most people think that Virginia "stops" west of the BRP, never considering that Cumberland Gap, Virginia is actually west of Detroit, Michigan.   There's tens of thousands of miles of roads that you haven't seen; I've ridden 60 miles on a summer weekday on VA40 from Waverly to Blackstone Virginia and passed 3 cars going the other way ....

Just happens to be one of the subjects I have some experience with!

Although the original question was not really "What kind of riding do you have around your home?" or "What's your favorite place to ride?", but was "What do you do for recreational riding around home if the roads are all section boundaries on flat land?"   And we've gotten those answers and a lot more!  which is all to the good ...

Lannis
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: s1120 on January 14, 2019, 03:15:29 PM
It amazes me that the roads can be that straight... Living in the northeast, upstate NY, you never see straight for more then a few miles. Im smack in between the hudson valley of NY, and the berkshires of Mass...  I don't get flat, or straight... and I kinda like it that way.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: calfruit on January 14, 2019, 03:29:09 PM
I live in rural central Calif.  6 miles from my door, Hwy180 begins its climb to Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks
It is a superbly engineered road, full of sweepers, climbing to 6000 feet in about 25 miles. It is my once a week reality check on life.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Lannis on January 14, 2019, 03:41:03 PM
It amazes me that the roads can be that straight... Living in the northeast, upstate NY, you never see straight for more then a few miles. Im smack in between the hudson valley of NY, and the berkshires of Mass...  I don't get flat, or straight... and I kinda like it that way.

One of the best days I ever had riding was in New York.   Three of us were riding three of my BSAs from the BSA International Rally in Brimfield, MA, headed to Niagara Falls (my two English friends wanted to see some sights).

We were on US20 going west, and passed by Cherry Valley in the morning.   It was a beautiful August day, the fields all full of corn, and we would ride up a ridge, over the top, and see miles and miles of countryside and a "finger lake" of some kind spread out.   We'd ride down into the valley, across the bottom, up the other side (miles and miles each), top the next ridge, and there would be another valley spread out.   Over and over again, it was really nice.

I had been telling my friends about the dangers of deer on the road, but we hadn't seen one in two weeks of riding.  As we were riding down into a valley, we looked to the right and could see a big buck running wide open, maybe 500 yards away, angling toward the road to a point about half a mile ahead of us.   We watched him as we were riding, started slowing down, and sure enough he blasted straight across the road 50 feet ahead of us .... He was a big boy, good job we had our eyes on him.

But overall a very nice ride ...

Lannis
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: bodine99 on January 14, 2019, 04:02:06 PM
Geez Lannis I thought I was in riding paradise with 11 turns in 312 miles!!!! Ahh, but the wife and I spent Thurs-Sun. riding in the Winter Garden, Lake Apopka area. The winter part low 70s and beautiful!!
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Ncdan on January 14, 2019, 05:18:12 PM
My area, the Piedmont Triad, has become a metropolitan area in the last 20 years but I can ride one hour north on US 52 and hit the BLUE RIDGE PARKWAY and have 400+ miles of some of the best ridding on the planet. I woukd like to be able to do the long flat ribbons out west, it would be nice to just ride snd not have to worry about cars pulling out in front of you, billboards and curves.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: gliderjohn on January 14, 2019, 05:20:45 PM
From Chuck:
Quote
Just out converting hydrocarbons to noise and enjoying the moment.
Sounds good to me.  :thumb:
GliderJohn
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Guzzistajohn on January 14, 2019, 05:33:16 PM
I'm good riding anywhere, as long as it's not in a city. The wide open plains certainly have their beauty but I sure feel blessed to be in the Ozarks, I've ridden in several states, but Mo. & Ark. are about as good as any if you like solitude and nature. It's been said "Ozarks Mountains aren't that high but our hollows are deep"
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Paul Brooking on January 14, 2019, 05:38:22 PM
Island Lagoon
Salt lakes in South Australia's "Gibber Desert" country. (gibbers are small round stones shaped by the incessant wind and sand blasting)

This is not far from the start of the longest straight-line railway journey in the world across the Nullabour Plain (487 Kms)


(https://i.ibb.co/QDggJkn/IMG-0439-1.jpg) (https://ibb.co/QDggJkn)

 (https://babynamesetc.com/j)

(https://i.ibb.co/JQyybjv/Australia-Map-TAR.jpg) (https://ibb.co/JQyybjv)
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: s1120 on January 15, 2019, 06:30:48 AM
One of the best days I ever had riding was in New York.   Three of us were riding three of my BSAs from the BSA International Rally in Brimfield, MA, headed to Niagara Falls (my two English friends wanted to see some sights).

We were on US20 going west, and passed by Cherry Valley in the morning.   It was a beautiful August day, the fields all full of corn, and we would ride up a ridge, over the top, and see miles and miles of countryside and a "finger lake" of some kind spread out.   We'd ride down into the valley, across the bottom, up the other side (miles and miles each), top the next ridge, and there would be another valley spread out.   Over and over again, it was really nice.

I had been telling my friends about the dangers of deer on the road, but we hadn't seen one in two weeks of riding.  As we were riding down into a valley, we looked to the right and could see a big buck running wide open, maybe 500 yards away, angling toward the road to a point about half a mile ahead of us.   We watched him as we were riding, started slowing down, and sure enough he blasted straight across the road 50 feet ahead of us .... He was a big boy, good job we had our eyes on him.

But overall a very nice ride ...

Lannis

Ya there are some amazing views out there. Im on the eastern part of the state now near Mass, but I used to live in Schenectady for many years, and those were my most active motorcycle years..  I used to ride 20 west often..  Used to have meetings in the Liverpool aera of NY and would take the bike..  Nice old time roads of a time gone past..  Views of life before the interstates.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: twowheeladdict on January 15, 2019, 06:43:13 AM
Reminds me of when I went to the Moonshine Lunch Run.  As soon as I crossed into Kentucky on the little ferry over the Ohio River I knew I was home again!

Illinois was flat straight roads with deer crossing all times of the day.  I'm glad I went and checked it off my bucket list.

 
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Texas Turnip on January 15, 2019, 06:47:57 AM
I like riding the lonely desolate roads and think about the early travelers making maybe 20 miles a day. I think it was 20 days of travel by stagecoach from San Antonio to San diego, CA I can crank it up and be in the next town in an hour and get a soda pop. We sho nuff have it easy.

An old bumper sticker I-10 Texas 846 miles, two curves. "Tex. where are the two curves?" One in the mix master in downtown Houston and the other in San Antonio. "The sun has risen and the sun has set And I ain't out of Texas yet."

Tex
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: twowheeladdict on January 15, 2019, 06:50:54 AM
I like riding the lonely desolate roads and think about the early travelers making maybe 20 miles a day. I think it was 20 days of travel by stagecoach from San Antonio to San diego, CA I can crank it up and be in the next town in an hour and get a soda pop. We sho nuff have it easy.

An old bumper sticker I-10 Texas 846 miles, two curves. "Tex. where are the two curves?" One in the mix master in downtown Houston and the other in San Antonio. "The sun has risen and the sun has set And I ain't out of Texas yet."

Tex

I've crossed Texas in the sunshine, but I was on a Concours 1400.   :evil:
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Chuck in Indiana on January 15, 2019, 07:07:14 AM
I live in rural central Calif.  6 miles from my door, Hwy180 begins its climb to Kings Canyon and Sequoia National Parks
It is a superbly engineered road, full of sweepers, climbing to 6000 feet in about 25 miles. It is my once a week reality check on life.

I *love* that road.  :thumb: I'd ride it once a week, too, if I could..
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Yukonica on January 16, 2019, 08:41:08 PM
Depends on how you define the Middle of Nowhere.  This picture illustrates my definition. Middle of Nowhere is good for the soul:


(https://i.ibb.co/mJVjdgQ/CFDBC5-F5-6709-4265-8079-18-F2927053-EE.jpg) (https://ibb.co/mJVjdgQ)


The interpretation is certainly a key point. Pop up for a visit some time; we have lot's of 'good for the soul'.
Both roads are really quiet scenic. There's one to Alaska and another to the Arctic Ocean. Not much traffic on either one.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: tris on January 17, 2019, 04:40:15 AM
(http://www.dankalal.net/2012trip13/photo025.JPG)

I can see why cruise control is of interest over there  :thumb:

However, "WOT - Brake - Roundabout - Repeat" around whatever town by-pass you're on can be fun on occasion
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Huzo on January 17, 2019, 04:44:36 AM
A bit more of KS.

(https://i.ibb.co/ZNDLNsn/DSCN0199.jpg) (https://ibb.co/ZNDLNsn)


(https://i.ibb.co/5x0V3Wn/DSC06097.jpg) (https://ibb.co/5x0V3Wn)

Central KS can look a bit flat from the air.

(https://i.ibb.co/M6cJ2zw/DSCN0280.jpg) (https://ibb.co/M6cJ2zw)

2 stanza poems about life (https://poetandpoem.com/2-stanza)

GliderJohn
Is that a Schweitzer 1/26 you're in ?
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Aaron D. on January 17, 2019, 06:11:41 AM
We rode around a good part of the US again last summer, and loved pretty much all of it-taking US and state roads will get you to some great places.

Still, some of the funnest riding was NC/ Virginia. We love finding tiny roads where the road winds right through a farm. I'll track down the route.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: gliderjohn on January 17, 2019, 06:46:30 AM
From Huzo:
Quote
Is that a Schweitzer 1/26 you're in ?
Close, a 2-33.
GliderJohn
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Sasquatch Jim on January 17, 2019, 06:48:02 AM
"S'truth", The midwest does do a magnificent job of putting chicken strips on your tires.
 Butt, and this is a deadly butt, You must dodge the local farm boys who regularly run through the stop signs, ( those are for tourists you know), which are at the county road crossings.  When the corn is up (as in the best riding weather) it is impossible to see them coming, and if you slow down just because you can't see them coming at the intersection, their cousin will hit you from behind.
Title: Re: The Middle of Nowhere, Motorcycle-Wise ...
Post by: Texas Turnip on January 17, 2019, 10:26:07 AM
There is a town in Okltexahoma called Nowhere. Beaver and I found it on our way to Slapout, OK.
Dusty, you been there?

Tex