Author Topic: Best option for GPS audio?  (Read 2669 times)

Offline 1Sourdough

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Best option for GPS audio?
« on: March 18, 2015, 10:23:30 PM »
I am wondering about the options for hearing GPS audible instructions.  It's certain I won't be able to see it well enough in all lighting conditions to count on viewing the display.  Actually, I know I don't want to be watching that thing while riding at all.

So I am wondering about a blue tooth linked something inside the helmet, or is there a better option: something which would go outside the helmet on the upper body or such?  A speaker which I could hear without blaring to all in the area when I'm in slow traffic.  I usually wear earplugs to protect what hearing I still have, and am not sure having an earphone yelling in my ear all day would be desirable.  But I have no idea what the useful selections are. 
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Offline Stephan Grahn

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2015, 01:39:20 AM »
Hi, have a look at these. Have been using them for years. Great for both music and driving instructions from your GPS. Available both in bluetoothe and cabel connection.

http://neckmike.us/

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Offline ChuckH

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #2 on: March 19, 2015, 05:16:15 AM »
I use a Mix-It 2 along with helmet speakers.  The Mix-It is powered from the bike through the auxillary fuse box, connected to the sound signal from the GPS and the output goes into my speakers.  This system allows me to hear the road turning commands from the GPS, along with the music that's in the MP3 portion of the GPS.  Not super high-tech but it has worked for several years.

I think Aerostitch has the Mix-It2 in their catalog.
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Offline charlie b

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2015, 07:22:09 AM »
I use a helmet mounted comm set with bluetooth to the phone and GPS.  No fiddling with ear pieces and they are loud enough to be heard with earplugs, loud pipes and trucks next to you on the interstate.

Most of the time I turn off the GPS voice as it can be really irritating in traffic.

To be able to see the GPS mount it with a RAM system.  Just tilt it down until the glare goes away and you'll be able to see it fine.  FWIW, my biggest problem with glare on GPS and phones is the sun reflecting off my jacket (bright yellow or red).
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Offline Moto

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Re:
« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2015, 07:25:37 AM »
It's a good idea to keep using earplugs and get a system loud enough to be heard through them. This means helmet speakers. I have such a setup, now pretty old, using a Boosteroo (?) amp and wired speakers. Leaving your earplugs in saves your hearing from wind and road noise.

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Offline smdl

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2015, 07:37:57 AM »
I use a SENA Bluetooth system with S Plug earplug speakers.  I'd rather have the audio on the inside of the earplugs so it isn't competing with all the other noise.  That way, I can keep the level low, and still hear it just fine.  Better for my hearing, I think.

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Shaun
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Offline Wayne Orwig

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2015, 07:56:15 AM »
I use earplugs, and a Sena SMH-10 Bluetooth speaker system.
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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #7 on: March 19, 2015, 11:06:49 AM »
Sena or Scala Bluetooth comms.  If you only need Bluetooth and not the comm part take a look at the Scala Qz.  Its just like their comm sets but only does Bluetooth for your phone and/or gps and is cheaper than a full blown comm head set.

Offline charlie b

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #8 on: March 19, 2015, 12:51:32 PM »
For brands just about any are fine.  I had an early Scala, Sena and now a UClear, which I like the best only because it does not have a boom/wired mike to get fouled up with the modular helmet.

If you have a 3/4 or FF helmet I prefer the Sena SMH-10.
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Offline 1Sourdough

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #9 on: March 19, 2015, 09:29:03 PM »
Thanks for the input. 

I read some threads which ran on WG a couple of years ago and wondered whether any significant new products are available.  Looks like there are.  Some of the 'earbud' style systems appear to have noise blocking construction, rather than just the tiny speaker disks which make my ears hurt to the point it seems the whole sides of my head have been assaulted.  That may be the route to go.  I'll look into the several specific types mentioned here and see if something is really the cat's meow!
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Re:
« Reply #10 on: March 19, 2015, 10:35:47 PM »
It's a good idea to keep using earplugs and get a system loud enough to be heard through them. This means helmet speakers. I have such a setup, now pretty old, using a Boosteroo (?) amp and wired speakers. Leaving your earplugs in saves your hearing from wind and road noise.

Sent from Tapatalk.

If you use very high quality earbuds for audio, not only do they seal out a lot of noise, the volume to hear audio from whatever source you have isn't very loud. I use Senheiser earbuds and often just use them to reduce noise in general while riding.

They are amazing but not inexpensive, you get what you pay for. Figure on spending close to $100 or even more but the money spent is worth it.

To avoid a wire going to the source, if handlebar mounted, use a bluetooth dongle, it fits into your jacket pocket and the earbuds plug into that. Now you are wireless.

Really good earbuds will serve you well in other situations too. If you fly often is take public transportation, they will block out most of the noise yet let you hear audio very clearly without cranking up the volume and damaging your hearing.

Offline Moto

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Re:
« Reply #11 on: March 20, 2015, 12:29:39 AM »
Whether ear buds are better for your hearing depends solely on their dB reduction factor when they are turned off, compared to that of foam earplugs properly seated. This determines the background noise any signal must overcome. It doesn't matter whether a sufficient signal is being produced inside or outside the earplugs; it's the level at your eardrum that counts. If foam earplugs are providing a lower baseline level because they are better earplugs than ear buds, the signal at the eardrum can be correspondingly lower. It's simple if you think it through. I expect the earplugs have a significant baseline level advantage over any ear buds because the speakers contained in the latter would be better conductors of sound than the foam making up the former.

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Offline smdl

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Re: Best option for GPS audio?
« Reply #12 on: March 20, 2015, 11:03:22 PM »
The S Plugs are very effective just as ear plugs,  but have the benefit of putting the audio on the inside.

http://www.plugup.com/the_S_plug_stereo_earbuds_s/67.htm

Cheers,
Shaun
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