Author Topic: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild  (Read 20528 times)

Offline balvenie

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #120 on: June 13, 2018, 07:55:22 PM »
Thanks for those great pics, Rick :grin: :thumb:
Oz
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As ye practice, so do ye teach.

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #121 on: June 14, 2018, 04:07:34 PM »
Thanks for following along :) It makes it more fun to post when you know somebody is following.

I have more and more doubt about this type of hydraulic clutch setup. Now it works and it works very well, but I don't know if it is an actual improvement over a well lubed cable. So far I like the way it is working and feel is also good. The main reason for not going back to cable was simply to prove to myself that it could be done better than it was. I will try to measure the force it takes to pull in the clutch lever if I can find a luggage weight to measure it with. It is not super hard but it is no feather light action either. Maybe next week I can try and measure the cable pull clutch from my buddys G5 and see how the difference is.

Just put in one step bigger idle jets so now the jetting is:
Main 134
Idle 54
Needle K-18
Choke 70
Slide I believe is a 60. Will check tomorrow and will check needle height.
I suspect it is running a bit rich at the moment so will try to do some plug pulls tomorrow and see how they look.

Did another 100km on the bike today and it is running very well. On the control side of things. I have still not gotten used to the two button indicator setup. Mainly the right side indicator button is what bugs me, very time you want to indicate to the right you let go of the throttle a bit or completely to reach around and push the button. Makes it really difficult to be smooth on the gas in and out of right hand turns. Roundabouts are the worst on the indicator side of things.

Mostly minor issues or concerns now, the bikes rides well overall  :bike-037:
I received the AFR500v2 wideband controller the other day, so might make up a fitting to put in the exhaust without having to plug it directly in the header pipes. Will see how much time I got on my hands.

Took it down to check on the boat :)


Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996


Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #122 on: June 15, 2018, 03:15:06 PM »
A few more thoughts and niggles.

I have now done around 500 km on the bike the last few days, jetting is close to being good, although I suspect it running on the lean side. Will try to make up the pipe for the wideband controller and see if I can get some readings from the exhaust.

Still dislike the two button indicator setup. Will probably change it to a 3-way switch and push buttons for light. Hoping to find a newer Ducati left switch, they should have this setup.

Seat is too low and foot pegs are too high for rides with full gear, if I ride just in my jeans I don't have so much trouble, but it is really cramped with riding pants on too. Might have to think up some new foot peg mounting and make a new seat. I want the bike to be comfortable enough to ride longer distances with no major discomfort. So these two mods are definitely going to happen at some point.

Clutch seem to work better and better, the clutch action is pretty light now. Still don't have anything to measure it with.

-Ulrik
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #123 on: June 16, 2018, 03:13:30 AM »
 Current jetting of the bike that I think is working well is:

Main jet 134
Idle jet 54
Needle K-18, third notch from top.
Throttle slides I have found not to be the same :( 60/3 on the left side and 50/3 on the right side. I have to dig into my stash and see if the slides from the phf30s are the same, then I can try those out if they are not too worn.

-Ulrik
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Offline balvenie

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #124 on: June 16, 2018, 04:17:11 AM »
The throttle slides are different :shocked:
But from what you have demonstrated Rick, you could make your own version :grin: :thumb:
Oz
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As ye practice, so do ye teach.

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #125 on: June 16, 2018, 04:27:30 AM »
Haha, I could probably, but I think it would take a lot longer than to dig through my pile of parts to find the phf30's I have somewhere. I believe the slides should be the same as for the 36's. Hopefully they are not too worn and will match.

I don't know why on earth he has send me two different slides in the carbs I have bought as a kit. Didn't think about checking it back then. Don't know if he would like to send me a new slide to match two years after I bought them.

Sent from my SM-A520F using Tapatalk

Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #126 on: June 20, 2018, 06:44:19 AM »
I promised to post some pictures of how the bleed screw exits above the shifter arm but forgot about it, so here you go :)


I have also changed the front tire as it was 11 years old. As mentioned in a post several pages back I bought a set of Bridgestone S21 tires, but never got them mounted. I will not mount the rear tire before the current Michelin Pilot Power 2ct  is worn enough to justify it. I installed an Outlex tubeless kit on the front rim and so far it looks to do the job with no leaks :) I have 400km on the tire since changing it on sunday and it doesn't seem to have lost any air.

Cleaning of the rim to ensure a good bond. I used a kitchen towel and brake cleaner. There was a lot of dust and dirt inside the tire and on the rim from I can only guess is the tire and tube rubbing against each other. It took a while to get it clean!


Rim with the tubeless kit installed. There is two layers of tape, the first one is a rubbery tape that sticks on both sides. This one you put down and ensure that there is a good bond all over and take care to get all the air squeezed out so there isn't any air pockets. The next layer is a protection tape, that isn't really a tape as it doesn't stick but is stuck on the double stick first layer. First layer is put on with the joint to the left of the valve hole and the second layer is put on with the joint on the right side. On the last joint you put an extra layer of double stick and protection tape.


This rim has the tubeless tire safety beads on, so I should be good to go with them.

-Ulrik
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Online rutgery

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #127 on: June 20, 2018, 04:08:49 PM »
interesting! I didn't even know these kinds of kits existed! Is the side of the tire sealed by the air pressure inside the tire? Also, will tyre shops service your wheels?
'82 Moto Guzzi G5
'89 V7 Sport replica WIP

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #128 on: June 20, 2018, 04:29:13 PM »
The tape only seals the spokes from leaking. The tire seals like a normal tubeless. It requires the tire to be tubeless of course, but you can hardly get any tires that is not meant for tubeless applications anymore.

If you can get a tire shop to change your tires afterwards, I have no idea. I have always changed my own tires, so I have never asked a tire shop if they would do it or not. If you're in US I'm guessing no. Here in Denmark, you could probably get them to change your tires no problem. They would probably say that if it leaks or anything happens to you, it is your own responsibility.

There is lots of different ways to make a spoke rim tubeless. Try and do a search on it, adv rider has a few threads on it. And I know there should be some threads on it here also. If I would do it again, the i think I would go for the 3m extreme adhesion tape instead of the outlex kit. The idea is the same but the cost is very different

The front rim was a bit tricky to do as the tape was wider than the recess in the rim, so some of the tape would be on the side "wall" of the rim. I expect the rear to be much easier to do.

-Ulrik

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Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #129 on: June 28, 2018, 09:57:44 AM »
I managed to get around 800km on the Guzzi this time around and it was running smoothly most of the time. I suspect the springs for the ignition advance is old and stretched as it has been pinging a bit. I checked the timing and it was right on the spot at full advance and it was mostly pinging between 2500-3500. I reduced the total advance a bit and this made it run better without pinging. New advance springs will be on order for the next round of spareparts.

Clutch is still working perfectly.

I was supposed to leave for Bali on friday but the company didn't want to pay for the change of ticket, So I had a few extra days on my hands. In an earlier post I pulled the engine out of my Alfa and I took the extra few days in Denmark as a chance to get it put back together.


The empty block.


Parts to go in. New liners and pistons, new small end bushings in conrods, reground crankshaft and new main and big end bearings.


Pistons on the rods.


Crank, liners and pistons in block and all torqued down. nuts locked with loctite 270 as recommended by Jim K in his book on high performance Alfa twin cams.


Block with front cover and sump mounted. Oil pump mounted and timed. The oilpump is driving the distributor, so if it is installed out of timing the distributor don�t pop in in the right direction. The engine can run, but the number 1 high voltage wire must be positioned different than normal. Makes trouble shooting a bit more troublesome.


Cylinder head mounted. New valves, new guides and new springs. Was overhauled by a local engine rebuilding shop, so it was al ready to be mounted to the block.

And the completed engine.


At this time I started to clean up all the left over packing from new parts and found a oil slinger washer that I missed when mounting the front cover! Damn it! Cylinder head and sump has to come off to get the front cover off meaning an extra full day of work. I had to fly back to Indonesia on the same day, so that was not an option.

The offending washer. 2mm to big to go through the hole for the front crankseal.


In the lathe, made a little holding tool to being able to trim the 2mm off the diameter.


Washer in the right place after trimming of the diameter. A high quality crank seal will be put in to offset any problems the trimming might have done. I don't expect it to make any difference in the washers ability to sling away the oil from the crank seal.


Completed engine, now with all washers installed. Keeping the Guzzi company until I return back in august.


-Ulrik
 
« Last Edit: June 28, 2018, 10:29:23 AM by Rick4003 »
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Offline perter

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #130 on: June 28, 2018, 03:46:06 PM »
Nice job, must be "relaxing" to get back to work with such a busy vacation! :wink:

Offline balvenie

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #131 on: June 28, 2018, 07:12:36 PM »
Great pics Rick :thumb:
Oz
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As ye practice, so do ye teach.

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #132 on: June 28, 2018, 09:22:47 PM »
Nice job, must be "relaxing" to get back to work with such a busy vacation! :wink:
It was actually quite relaxing to assemble the engine. Until I found that damn washer at least

For work I can't quite complain, I just got back home to Bali and now our local volcano erupted so they closed the airport. So now I can not do anything else than hang out with the girls at home, so that is not bad at all


« Last Edit: June 28, 2018, 09:23:30 PM by Rick4003 »
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #133 on: July 04, 2018, 06:37:47 AM »
I'm no expert in photoshop and I don't even have the program, so I played around in paint a bit and came up with this.



This would be the allround theme that the bike should take in the furture. Seat will be a bench style seat in brown, tool box in black and side covers for the toolbox in same pearl white as the tank.

With the new seat there will also be made a new rear fender to match the front aluminium fender. There will be new more classic looking indicators too.

The seat will be quite a bit taller than the old one as the riding position right now is very cramped. I will see after the seat is made if I have to lower the footpegs also.

-Ulrik
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Offline perter

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #134 on: July 11, 2018, 05:25:06 AM »
I really dig the point of getting a taller seat, I have a low seat and Tarozzi rearsets on mine too and with 1,84cm height and inseam between 32 and 34 inches in jeans it becomes a challenge to fit the legs. Especially for an older man like me  :embarrassed:

On the other hand, a plain bench seat like you illustrated may make the bike look even longer and lower than you like. I know it's a matter of taste and your propsal is definetely classic, personally I just like to have a shorter and more compressed look on my bikes so I would probably shorten the seat a bit or make it decline in an angle to meet the fender?

I like the idea to close the hole under the seat. As you may see, I have the same "cafe racer hole" in mine and it tends to be outdated now, so I'm looking in closing the hole as well.

Just some thoughts - it's a nice bike in any incarnation

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #135 on: July 11, 2018, 05:57:13 AM »
Hej Per,

I get the thoughts about the seat, it is definitely just a sketch but I think that the height and length of the seat will make the bike look more balanced than with the current seat. At the moment the bikes looks as long as a locomotive when you are standing next to it. So I don't think it will hurt with the longish bench seat. I would like to be able to carry a passenger and to be able to strap things on the back of the seat. How it ends up looking is not cast in stone so it might be changed around when I get started to do some actual work on the seat project. I'm 187cm and 34inch inseam so you get the idea about the taller seat ;)

The filling of the hole has been a long time plan of mine. I think I will make a combined toolbox and airbox. The trumpets will be dropped in favor of a well designed (hopefully) Airbox that will be in the front of the tool/airbox. My idea is to use a flat panel style airfilter from a car and then make an access door through the toolbox so the filter can be easily serviced or exchanged. The snorkel for the airbox will then run through the "V" of the engine and catch air in the front triangle of the frame. How long the snorkel have to be I have to do some calculations on. It is apparently quite a science making an airbox.
Side covers/doors for the tool box will be in the style of the V7 sport.     

-Ulrik
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Online canuck750

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #136 on: July 11, 2018, 08:57:09 AM »
Great pictures of your Alfa motor, I love the sump casting, Italian art work at its finest! The Guzzi is looking pretty smart too.
1949 Guzzio Airione
1958 Guzzi Cardellino
1972 Guzzi Eldorado
1972 Bemelli Enduro
1973 Guzzi V7 Sport
1973 Laverda SF1
1973 Benelli 650 Tornado
1974 Guzzi 750S
1975 Moto Morini 3 1/2 Strada
1978 Moto Morini 500
2008 KLR 650
2015 KLR 650
2016 BMW K1600

SOLD

1975 750 S3
1977 Le Mans
1993 1000

Online Rick4003

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #137 on: July 11, 2018, 09:25:38 AM »
Great pictures of your Alfa motor, I love the sump casting, Italian art work at its finest! The Guzzi is looking pretty smart too.

I agree, they really did make a great engine when they designed this one. Consider that this engine was designed more than 65 years ago it is very high tech and well made. If the block doesn't freeze and cracks then it can be rebuild as many times as you want. All the wear parts can be changed out as I more or less did with this rebuild. On that account it is a bit like a Guzzi engine. Now after the rebuild I just hope it spins like it is famous for, because it did not do that before the rebuild that's for sure!

Thanks on the bike too :)

-Ulrik
Moto Guzzi 850 T5 (850 sport) - 1985
Moto Guzzi Ambassador - 1967
Yamaha FZR 600 - 1996

Online canuck750

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Re: Rick4003's T5 restoration/rebuild
« Reply #138 on: July 11, 2018, 06:56:46 PM »
I agree, they really did make a great engine when they designed this one. Consider that this engine was designed more than 65 years ago it is very high tech and well made. If the block doesn't freeze and cracks then it can be rebuild as many times as you want. All the wear parts can be changed out as I more or less did with this rebuild. On that account it is a bit like a Guzzi engine. Now after the rebuild I just hope it spins like it is famous for, because it did not do that before the rebuild that's for sure!

Thanks on the bike too :)

-Ulrik

Gotta love Italian engineering, their QQ / QC may not be the best but their designs are second to none. Only an Italian engineer can make an alumnum casting a thing of beauty

1949 Guzzio Airione
1958 Guzzi Cardellino
1972 Guzzi Eldorado
1972 Bemelli Enduro
1973 Guzzi V7 Sport
1973 Laverda SF1
1973 Benelli 650 Tornado
1974 Guzzi 750S
1975 Moto Morini 3 1/2 Strada
1978 Moto Morini 500
2008 KLR 650
2015 KLR 650
2016 BMW K1600

SOLD

1975 750 S3
1977 Le Mans
1993 1000

 


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