Author Topic: Time for a long road trip  (Read 6179 times)

Offline oilhed

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #90 on: September 26, 2018, 09:05:52 PM »
Not the same "character" though.. <shrug>  :smiley: Yeah, I had a 1000SP, too.

I wanted a 1000SP, could only afford a V65SP. Couldn't even afford to look at BMWs. In to 80's fresh outta college and just married.
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Online gliderjohn

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #91 on: September 26, 2018, 09:10:38 PM »
From oilhead:
Quote
I wanted a 1000SP, could only afford a V65SP. Couldn't even afford to look at BMWs. In to 80's fresh outta college and just married.
Don't feel bad. I was in the same boat in 1979 and bought a 77 Suzuki GS400 with 5K miles for $800. But it did serve me well for 40K miles until I could obtain a Guzzi.
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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #92 on: September 26, 2018, 10:27:33 PM »
FYI for next time, if you flip the BMW upside down you can shift it to third gear and that works better for getting 'home'   :grin:  An old 'GS in the middle of nowhere' trick.  Or you could use one of these...

As with V11 Sports, shifter springs on airhead BMWs break occasionally, and did so then as much as now.  Its not really an old bike thing.

Hmm, you may be right. Now that I think about it, it turned out the spring had been replaced about two months earlier in a transmission rebuild done by the local BMW dealer. The cost of the spring on the invoice was something like $1.50. Of course it cost much, much more to get it all fixed up in Bremerton, Washington, the nearest place to Crater Lake, Oregon, that would work on my bike.

As for those tools, it's a bad sign indeed if BMW riders were taking such things with them. I was fooled by my generalized impression of "BMW quality" into buying an old one as a dependable ride for a long triangle route through backroads of Idaho, Oregon and Washington. I wish I'd known about this issue. Never again. I won't be needing the tool, but thanks for the tip.

Moto

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #93 on: September 26, 2018, 10:41:45 PM »
I only owned this one 10,000 miles and one year.  In that time I has warped front rotors.  The ride was amazing but the weather protection was so good I couldn't stand riding it from April to October while wearing protective riding gear.  In hindsight I should have kept it for a winter bike and traded my Road Glide Ultra for a Road King Special. 

My local dealer lost Triumph and the next closest was 2 1/2 hours away.  It was summer and I was motivated to make a trade.

It has a tall seat height and holds 7 or more gallons of fuel so it feels heavier at a light than the Road Glide. 



Fifteen thousand miles and never a hiccup with ours. Ten thousand miles between oil changes, it's a great two up ride. 350 mile range really helps when you are exploring western county and state roads, and I've got a lowered seat and lowered pegs to make the weight easier for this old man to handle...
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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #94 on: September 26, 2018, 11:35:04 PM »
Read a contemporary test on a small valve Guzzi with 30-mm carbs and you'll find that its probably the slowest accelerating large motorcycle that was then available.

Check out these test results obtained in 1975 through 1978:






The MIRA testing station is/was apparently some big deal in Britain, a standard of accuracy. The tester for the British magazine Motor Cycle reports in June, 1975, the T3 "beating a Norton Commando 850 on top speed and matching it for acceleration over the quarter mile" in tests done there. He continues, "By any reckoning, a mean top speed of 116.9 mph and a best one way of just over 119 mph was pretty good. And, for a tourer, 14.3 seconds over the quarter mile [at 95.1 mph] was more than adequate for most needs." -- reported by the original Motor Cycle magazine tester in 1975 (name lost by me) in Classic and Motorcycle Mechanics, October, 2001, p. 61.

Not disputing the comparison to a 1000cc R100 tested six years later, but in the mid-1970's context the Guzzis were doing just fine.

Moto
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 12:04:26 AM by Moto »
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Online Rough Edge racing

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #95 on: September 27, 2018, 06:03:33 AM »
 Hmm....Looks like I'm having a brief love affair with the BMW R100S...The sellers said the service records don't show any receipts for valve work other than adjustments...It's no big deal for me to pull the heads and seat replacement ....might be 400 bucks for parts and machine work...not that I can't afford it...but the BMW in general may lack what I'm looking for..Perhaps I'll wait for an affordable V11 Sport.....Or another Ducati...What I do know is the big modern 650 pound fully faired sport tourers are for other riders, they are not for me...
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

Offline Petrus Rocks

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #96 on: September 27, 2018, 06:17:49 AM »
I find the chase for the next bike exhilarating :popcorn:
Until you sit on it and ride it you never know...

Online Aaron D.

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #97 on: September 27, 2018, 06:23:12 AM »
Shocked you don't just grab a Sportster and have at it. Stay off the interstate when possible, stay in hotels, get off the road before dark.

Online PeteS

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #98 on: September 27, 2018, 06:46:25 AM »
Hard to believe the BMW could go 60k miles on original valves and seats. The mechanic at out or local dealer had an identical '83 RT like mine. His valves got sucked into the head at 19k. Mine were shot at '23k. Also a CS being 1 second faster in the 1/4er than and RT. The fairing isn't that heavy and the engine and gearing were identical. I think only the '78s got the sport cam.

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Offline twowheeladdict

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #99 on: September 27, 2018, 07:24:04 AM »
Fifteen thousand miles and never a hiccup with ours. Ten thousand miles between oil changes, it's a great two up ride. 350 mile range really helps when you are exploring western county and state roads, and I've got a lowered seat and lowered pegs to make the weight easier for this old man to handle...

The 10,000 miles I put on the Trophy were all touring miles.  It was by far the best handling, best suspended, best weather protection "touring" bike I have ever owned.  I could ride all day with temps in the 40s and never miss a beat.  Curvy roads were not a problem for this bike either.  But here in the southeast it was miserable to be on that bike when the temps warmed up. 


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Online Rough Edge racing

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #100 on: September 27, 2018, 08:24:31 AM »
 I'm on the Lemans 4 in the swap meet here....It's just what I wanted, an Italian V twin with some thrust 
"
  Pete S, the seller supposedly has all the repair receipts from the first owner and he says there no mention of "expensive engine repairs..Reading on the Internet it's seems the valve seat jobs were done well before 60,000 miles...So who knows, maybe it was done...But there's always the few that last longer than average before chronic problems show up...
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Offline JJ

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #101 on: September 27, 2018, 08:47:45 AM »
The next long, overnight, weekend "ROAD TRIP" for me, (426 miles one way), is the 2nd annual SOCAL N.A.R. @ Lake Henshaw Resort, CA :thumb: :cool: :smiley:



« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 08:50:16 AM by JJ »
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Offline oilhed

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #102 on: September 27, 2018, 10:02:08 AM »
I'm on the Lemans 4 in the swap meet here....It's just what I wanted, an Italian V twin with some thrust 

SWEET  :gotpics:
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Online PeteS

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #103 on: September 27, 2018, 10:23:08 AM »
I'm on the Lemans 4 in the swap meet here....It's just what I wanted, an Italian V twin with some thrust 
"
 

Now your talkin'. Looks like your patience paid off. This will be way more fun than any airhead for sure.

Pete

Online Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #104 on: September 27, 2018, 10:32:40 AM »
I'm on the Lemans 4 in the swap meet here....It's just what I wanted, an Italian V twin with some thrust 
"
  Pete S, the seller supposedly has all the repair receipts from the first owner and he says there no mention of "expensive engine repairs..Reading on the Internet it's seems the valve seat jobs were done well before 60,000 miles...So who knows, maybe it was done...But there's always the few that last longer than average before chronic problems show up...

You might want a Corbin seat. Bought a Le Mans 1000 new in '86 (when I was 23) and lived with the stock seat through two long trips. One to the Guzzi rally in Rockingham, NC and a five day trip with my brother up to Watkins Glen and Ogdensburg, NY. After the NY trip, I immediately ordered a Corbin seat! 
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Offline Tusayan

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #105 on: September 27, 2018, 11:30:24 AM »
The LM IV looks like a good deal, looks to need some cosmetic work but low mileage and apparently all there.  A consideration for me in using it for long distance touring would be whether I could get hard, lockable luggage for it, and the price for that luggage - I don't like leaving stuff on the bike unlocked at every lunch break.  Otherwise a LM IV with 18 inch front wheel is really a pleasant touring bike, with the right seat.  Better on open roads than tight stuff, but workable anywhere.

Corbin seats are odd, some of them are just awful in my experience, worse than stock, while others work well.  FWIW I found the Corbin LM IV to be one of the better ones for my behind, in conjunction with Agostini rearset foot controls.  It all depends on your body.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 11:31:50 AM by Tusayan »

Online Rough Edge racing

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #106 on: September 27, 2018, 12:54:13 PM »


   I have been in touch with the owner....two problems, a previous on the fence buyer who now interested...He gets first dibs.....Secondly the bike has a Florida title in the previous owners name......

  Still looking....
« Last Edit: September 27, 2018, 01:08:27 PM by Rough Edge racing »
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Online Aaron D.

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #107 on: September 27, 2018, 03:03:19 PM »
Too bad, the LMIV is a pretty comfy high speed tourer.

Offline twowheeladdict

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #108 on: September 27, 2018, 05:48:35 PM »

   Secondly the bike has a Florida title in the previous owners name......

  Still looking....

Big red flag right there. 
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Offline Bob Wegman

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #109 on: September 27, 2018, 08:06:01 PM »
Tony,  When are you planning on starting your trip?
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Online Rough Edge racing

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #110 on: September 28, 2018, 05:14:51 AM »
Tony,  When are you planning on starting your trip?

  Bob, well, I need to find a bike or install a small fairing on my Monster...the actual trip? I have no plans as of yet.. I don't really plan too far ahead anyways...
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

Offline davevv

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #111 on: September 29, 2018, 12:44:16 AM »
Your buddy's Ulysses is an outstanding touring bike and this version of the Sportster motor is 103hp stock.  I bought this one new in 2007.  The only bike I ever toured on that was more comfortable was a Road King.


I've done the Norge as well, an '08 two valve.  Thousands of miles around Texas, to Key West and back, Barber vintage festival, etc.  I love the way this bike will eat miles.  Not quite as comfy as the Ulysses (for me) but not bad either. 


Either of these would be an excellent choice.
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Offline Petrus Rocks

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #112 on: September 29, 2018, 02:08:17 PM »
I'm the one with the Uly- Isyours a stock seat with a sheepskin?  Currently have a Corbin on but it's too hard.  Did you ever want highway pegs of some sort?

Online Rough Edge racing

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #113 on: September 29, 2018, 06:05:00 PM »
 I found a bike about 100 miles away , 98 Ducati ST2, 35,000 miles, 2700 bucks...Has the Ducati hard bags, aftermarket higher  clips ons and  Staintune mufflers...So now I have two Ducatis and a 79 Triumph...Stopped at a hillbilly bar for a great chicken sandwich ...

               


       
     
« Last Edit: September 29, 2018, 06:43:03 PM by Rough Edge racing »
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

Online Huzo

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #114 on: September 29, 2018, 06:55:30 PM »
So you've pulled the trigger and done it..?

Offline Petrus Rocks

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #115 on: September 30, 2018, 10:11:56 AM »
Tony pulled the trigger.  I saw the bike yesterday.  very clean.  good cosmetics.  Bodywork should be coming off soon.

Offline Tusayan

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #116 on: September 30, 2018, 10:52:09 AM »
Looks good! The ST4 I bought this year has the same Helibars and Staintunes, which BTW are both excellent and were both very expensive new.

Since this is a '98 I'd recommend you research and resolve the alternator and regulator issues that are unique to that year and this model of Ducati. Your bike has a single phase, high output PM alternator that would fry stators.  There was a factory update that added a slinger to throw more oil on the stator.  Also, the factory regulator was poor and would fail.  You cannot update either component to '99-on three phase spec because the crankshaft is different but if the slinger update is done and a different regulator adapted the '98 system can be made reliable without spending a fortune.

If the fuel filter hasn't been replaced recently, replace it and the associated rubber lines in the fuel tank  A clogged filter increases load on the fuel pump which increases load on the alternator.  Some people theorize this is why the first year alternator issues didn't get surfaced in factory testing,

Re removing the bodywork:  it's different than you think  :grin:  Inner fairing panels off first, then mirrors, then upper fairing, then lower fairing panels, then (and only then) fairing side panels.  It was designed to be assembled at the factory, apparently without regard to service time later on.  Replace any of the threaded rubber wellnuts that need it before reassembly. Try to get your hand behind the fairing and on each wellnut when starting the screw. Do not skimp here, and do not hurry, or it will drive you crazy if you do...

Looks like it has OEM Fuji front brake discs, which are warp prone.  Replacements are common to almost every other Italian bike of the 90s, but expensive.  EBCs are less expensive but still expensive.  If they pulse, this might take some creativity to limit costs.
« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 11:15:57 AM by Tusayan »

Online Huzo

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #117 on: September 30, 2018, 12:40:51 PM »
Now he seems like a worthwhile bloke to listen to...

Online Rough Edge racing

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #118 on: September 30, 2018, 04:19:05 PM »

Looks like it has OEM Fuji front brake discs, which are warp prone.  Replacements are common to almost every other Italian bike of the 90s, but expensive.  EBCs are less expensive but still expensive.  If they pulse, this might take some creativity to limit costs.

  Thanks for the tips, the bike won't be ridden much until a winter maintenance tear down...The seller said he just replaced the regulator.. The brakes look identical to my 96 Monster 900... The brakes feel smooth on this new to me ST2... The Monster had a the so called warped disc's and pulsing.. Because it floating ,it's difficult to measure....I bought used discs that work well... There's some  brake experts claiming that 90 percent of warped discs are not warped. It a variation in thickness caused by brake material deposits on the disc..And this is caused by brake pads not compatible with the rotor material..
 
Quote from: Petrus Rocks
Tony pulled the trigger.  I saw the bike yesterday.  very clean.  good cosmetics.  Bodywork should be coming off soon.

         wise ass !
« Last Edit: September 30, 2018, 05:20:59 PM by Rough Edge racing »
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

Offline Tusayan

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Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #119 on: September 30, 2018, 10:12:37 PM »
When the disks on a 90s Ducati like the ST2 pulse, I've seen them looking like a potato chip, no micrometer required!  :grin: They are the same as on your Monster.

In my experience a new OEM regulator on a '98 ST2 (I had one for 9 years) may last 20,000 miles or may last only 1,000 miles.  If it was properly replaced by a non-OEM (typically Japanese) unit, wired and mounted properly, that's likely a good thing.  It's a real issue on the '98s. BTW, one of the related issues is the stock regulator in very low profile in shape, and fits in a location where few if any replacements can be mounted.

When you have the bodywork off, check the connector at the output of the alternator.  It is undersized for the power and they are well known to fail.  One solution is the hard wire it.

Best of luck with the bike, I really like them.


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