Author Topic: Riding in solitude.  (Read 1127 times)

Online Muzz

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #30 on: December 08, 2018, 05:13:51 AM »
I ride often with one guy on a similarly powered bike.  Ok with that, and we understand each other.

Ride with my son and his mate, all good.

Ride by myself, I love it.  Ridden by myself most of my life.  My wife used to ride on the back but now considers herself "too old".  Sad, but her problem, not mine.  I am more than happy to ride by myself and will continue to do so.
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Offline ejs

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #31 on: December 08, 2018, 08:11:44 PM »
I mostly ride alone, if in a group, then it is with some fellow mil.vets😁
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Offline keener

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #32 on: December 08, 2018, 10:36:46 PM »
i prefer to ride alone especially when touring , like others have said the freedom of going where you want at any speed you desire, and to be totally in charge of your life and what can come to me is the essence of freedom .
I have done rides alone where i follow the sun, if the weather turns bad enough i find another way i have found some pretty lonely roads doing this and some great adventures like we say its the journey and not the destination .
Occasionally i will travel with an old riding buddy or with my girlfriend as a passenger  , it can be great as long as you both can accept compromise .
I avoid larger groups or rallies unless its for a short period of time , not my thing and i rather be just riding




« Last Edit: December 08, 2018, 10:42:59 PM by keener »
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Offline rider33

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #33 on: December 09, 2018, 08:27:22 AM »
For some, riding is a social event. For others, an escape from having to socialize.

For me, motorcycling is meditation. The engine sings a mantra and the mind empties of thoughts not necessary to steering around the curves or pondering the zen of the scenery..... I have on rare occasions enjoyed a group ride, but adjusting my pace to the lowest common denominator and surrendering the ability to veer off the planned route takes some of the fun out of it.


'bingo, and very nicely put.  I will ride with others if I can't get gracefully out of it but for me it sort of defeats the purpose.  Riding gets me away from the noise of everyday living, away from the obligations, the expectations, the ceaseless din.  It untethers me from who I've become and takes me back closer to who I really am.  If you ride and ride well it's total immersion, you are in the moment, completely focused.  Anything that distracts from that diminishes the experience IMHO.  A couple years back I rode with a friend out to Glacier, a trip I have done solo several times.  It was nice to have company once there but the ride out and back was a series of late starts, early stops & focus on what the other was doing vs where the road was leading me.  It might have been fine in a convertible but on a bike you just miss too much, it's still an experience, just not nearly as profound.  The more distractions you have, the less you are able to truly see.
"some journeys continue long after movement in time and space has ceased"  -Steinbeck

Online John A

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #34 on: December 09, 2018, 09:23:26 AM »
There is nothing better for my mental health than being 1500 miles from home,  relying on myself ,halfway through a road trip. I need another, please :grin:
« Last Edit: December 09, 2018, 09:24:25 AM by John A »
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Online Sheepdog

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #35 on: December 09, 2018, 11:29:37 AM »
I did a group ride with a bunch of coworkers some time back. The Cherohala Skyway and the Dragon were among our planned routes. I wound up spending the day wrenching and waiting for ambulances. Never again...

However, I do enjoy riding with by old friend, Briney Jim. We've been buds since 1974 and one of the principle things we do together is tour on motorcycles. We have long understood each other's comfort zones and have worked out our own hand signals and preferred lane positions (though we both have communicators these days). My wife feels a great deal better about my two-three week sojourns knowing that I have someone else along, so her stress level remains low. Plus, Jim rides a Guzzi...
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Offline azguzzirep

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #36 on: December 09, 2018, 01:51:09 PM »
If you love an empty road, stay out of Europe! 😁😁😁
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Offline KiwiTones

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #37 on: December 09, 2018, 03:37:18 PM »
After reading this thread, now I don't feel so different. I've only been riding 8 months and have gone out on group rides a few times with members of a Moto Guzzi group in Madrid. I enjoy the social interaction a lot, but at heart I know I also need time to myself, to do what I want without feeling the need to fit in with the group. Today I just did a four hour ride with my bike and my camera, stopping a few times to take photos, and going where my whim took me (as well as the need to refuel the V9). It was a nice day, but at the same time I wondered if I was anti-social, as some of the Moto Guzzi group where trying to get an outing organized, and I decided to stay silent.

I'll be going on a short tour of Morocco with my brother-in-law on motorbikes in late January. It'll be the first time I ride with him. (He's coming over from NZ.) and am looking forward to it a lot. I'm also looking forward to the 5 hour solo ride down to Málaga from Madrid to meet him. It'll be a time of meditation, as I'll have no bluetooth in my helmet - just my thoughts for company. I'm not that interesting a guy, but I don't need much to entertain me.  :grin:


Offline twowheeladdict

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #38 on: December 10, 2018, 07:13:16 AM »
Here is another aspect of riding (and especially touring) alone.

You are much more approachable when stopped for a break or a meal than if you are with a group.  I have regaled a restaurant full of locals with stories of the road because they are amazed that someone would venture so far from home alone and on two wheels.  Many of them have never ventured further than the next county their entire lives.
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Online Zigzagguzzi

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #39 on: December 10, 2018, 07:34:07 AM »
Years ago there wer articles about solo riders on long trips suddenly seeing themselves from above, looking down.. Very strange, but long streches of solitude can be hypnotic!  Anyone remember this or experienced the same?.

Offline oilhed

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #40 on: December 10, 2018, 07:49:35 AM »
I prefer to ride alone.  My route, my schedule, my detours.  I have a few friends I will ride with but it requires compromise. 
No passengers, either, not since the 80's!  My wife complains about it til I remind her I crashed once and went to the ER.
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Offline mobiker

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #41 on: December 10, 2018, 09:17:27 AM »
I rode out to the sandhills in western Nebraska a couple of years ago. I hadn't been out west for a while and had forgot how few people are there. I like the wide open spaces. The roads aren't that interesting, being mostly straight, but the plains have their own kind of beauty. I enjoyed the solitude.

I'm pretty much a lone wolf when it comes to riding. I really don't care for group rides. I've had some riding buddies over the years and enjoyed riding with one or two other people, but big groups not so much. Riding solo just gives a lot of freedom. Fast, slow, stop, don't stop, sudden course deviations, its all good.

Back in eighties/early nineties I had a girlfriend who enjoyed riding pillion and I enjoyed that a lot. She was a very good co-rider which makes a big difference.

Back when I rode bicycles, I did a lot of group rides with the local club. For road rides, I actually preferred riding in a small group to riding solo. Three to five bikes. Any more and we became a road obstruction, any less and you were more likely to be hassled by asshats in cars.
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Offline rider33

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #42 on: December 10, 2018, 11:19:38 PM »
Here is another aspect of riding (and especially touring) alone.

You are much more approachable when stopped for a break or a meal than if you are with a group.  I have regaled a restaurant full of locals with stories of the road because they are amazed that someone would venture so far from home alone and on two wheels.  Many of them have never ventured further than the next county their entire lives.

'good point & quite correct.  When you are traveling in a clump you tend to stick to the clump and people tend to avoid you.  When you are solo you are much more approachable and people tend to strike up a conversation much more easily. A solo rider with plates from a few thousand miles away tends to capture people's imagination, at least it has with me. They want to know where you are headed and why.  Flying over a place only gives you a rough idea of what it's about.  Driving gives you a ground level view but unless you get off the interstate and actually talk to folks,
it's only partial. Riding solo on back roads let's you smell, taste, and feel a place & talking to the indigenous population helps you to understand its rhythms.
"some journeys continue long after movement in time and space has ceased"  -Steinbeck

Offline KJDub

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #43 on: December 10, 2018, 11:32:15 PM »
I love to poke around on remote roads all by myself. Nothing feels more free.  Once I'm on the bike I don't want to stop. My bikes have never let me down. I've been to some amazing spots I couldn't have found if I tried.
KJ





Offline keener

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #44 on: December 11, 2018, 06:44:57 PM »
I love to poke around on remote roads all by myself. Nothing feels more free.  Once I'm on the bike I don't want to stop. My bikes have never let me down. I've been to some amazing spots I couldn't have found if I tried.
KJ








Looks like central Oregon to me .........some of the best riding anywhere 
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Offline keuka4884

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #45 on: December 11, 2018, 07:46:28 PM »
I also prefer to ride alone. There are many curvy country roads in the Finger Lakes with another nice lake view just down the road. I see lots of single riders in the summer. Watkins Glen and now the wineries bring more visitors every year.

Great topic. 
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Offline Chuck in Indiana

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Re: Riding in solitude.
« Reply #46 on: December 12, 2018, 07:32:00 AM »
'good point & quite correct.  When you are traveling in a clump you tend to stick to the clump and people tend to avoid you.  When you are solo you are much more approachable and people tend to strike up a conversation much more easily. A solo rider with plates from a few thousand miles away tends to capture people's imagination, at least it has with me. They want to know where you are headed and why.  Flying over a place only gives you a rough idea of what it's about.  Driving gives you a ground level view but unless you get off the interstate and actually talk to folks,
it's only partial. Riding solo on back roads let's you smell, taste, and feel a place & talking to the indigenous population helps you to understand its rhythms.

^^^^^
Yep. I prefer to ride alone, too. My own schedule, my changing destinations.  :smiley: I *do* like riding with The Kid.. we travel well in formation, and have very similar tastes and abilities.. but that is a different experience altogether.
« Last Edit: December 12, 2018, 07:34:46 AM by Chuck in Indiana »
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