Author Topic: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''  (Read 375 times)

Offline rutgery

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1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« on: May 13, 2020, 01:41:51 PM »
This will be a weird build log, as the build started a few months ago when I had the opportunity to buy a 1967 V7 700.

It started with an ad on a Dutch craigslist site for a 1967 V7 700 with a very old engine. The ad said the bike was in pieces to be restored, but had to be sold as the owner kept putting it off. As soon as I saw the ad I called, but in the nice conversation that followed it became clear that even though the ad was only 20 minutes old, the bike was already reserved for a German who would come and see the bike first thing tomorrow. It became clear to me that I wouldn't get an opportunity to see the bike as deals on these bikes rarely fall through.

But, as you propably guessed by seeing this build log, I got a call the next morning that the German hadn't responded to any contact and was still not at the seller. This meant that I could come and see the bike! As soon as I hung up the phone, me and my brother took the car and attached the trailer.

When we arrived in Amsterdam, the destination house was a narrow build house to house building with little room to have a garage or workshop.
The seller was extremely nice and told us the following about the V7;
This bike has had 3 previous owners where from the first two resided in Italy. The V7 was bought from the dealer on 30-06-1967 and lived a happy live in it's homeland Italy for 15 years before getting stored in a shed, as in this time, Italy started taxing the motorcycles differently. When a bike's road tax was not paid, the bike would never be allowed on the road again in Italy. This meant many of these old bikes were stored or even scrapped. Luckily, in this time a friend of the seller started importing these bikes from Italy into the Netherlands, and that's also what happened to this V7. It was imported in 19-09-1994 when it received it's third owner, the seller of the bike. He took the bike to a large Dutch dealer and that's where the bike received it's maintenance for the next 20 years and around 60k km. In this time major components like the crankcase bearings, cilinders& pistons and driveshaft parts were replaced. This ment that the bike had recieved a (now unobtainable) set of 700 giardini nikasil cilinders.

Of course when I saw the upgraded cilinders  I was sold. We loaded the bike up on the trailer.








We got home at 21:00 and that meant it was dark. I coudn't check the parts and would have to wait for the next day. The next day I checked all the numbers and saw that the framenumbers. ''VS 82 AB'' I am not 100% certain, but I think that would make this the 181st V7 700 to roll from the production line. On top of that, the crankcase is an old type without the diagonal rib, making it even more rare. It of course also has the first series valve covers.






As I mentioned before, it's a while ago that I started this puzzle. The reason that I called this a puzzle instead of a build is that the previous owner kindly included all things needed for a restoration including rubbers, gaskets and extra parts. I'll follow up this post with more pictures of the build.

'82 Moto Guzzi G5
'89 V7 Sport replica from a Cali 3
'67 V7 700 #181 from the production line

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2020, 03:29:41 PM »
Following this.  :azn:
Charlie
http://www.AntietamClassicCycle.com
'67 Sears Allstate/Puch SR250
'69 V700
'69 Ambassador
'76 Convert
'77 Morini 3 1/2 Strada

Offline Dave Swanson

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2020, 08:02:29 PM »
 Following!!  :popcorn:   
Dave Swanson Northern IL
1968 V700
1973 V7 Sport
1974 Eldo
1977 Vert
1977 Lemans 1.2
1980 T3 California
1993 1000S - Sparklehorse
2004 V11S - Eraldo-ized
2015 Norge GT8V - Beetle-ized
2015 V7 Special - Beetle-ized
2016 Griso SE - Beetle-ized

2003 EVT - departed and now remorseful

MGNOC L-780

Offline cliffrod

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2020, 08:47:02 PM »
Very cool.  I'll be watching as well.

An old motorcycle friend now lives in Turkey.  He has told me about the same issues there related to unused bikes and cars being impossible to return to road use there as well.  Doesn't matter what he finds- if registration and use has not been maintained without gaps , there's nothing that can be done to put the vehicle back on the road in the country.
1973 V7 Sport  "Now THAT'S a motorcycle!"-  Master Sculptor Giuliano Cecchinelli
1967 V700 Corsa Record
1964 Ducati 250
eccetera, eccetera...

http://carolinasculpturestudio.com/
Carolina Sculpture Studio Channel on YouTube-
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzSYaYdis55gE-vqifzjA6A

Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2020, 08:47:02 PM »

Offline Blaufeld66

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2020, 02:57:38 AM »
Uhm... the story seems a little strange... I live in Italy, if you don't pay the road tax you can't circulate, but if you accept to pay all past taxes (plus a fine), you can use the bike again...
Sold:
1984 V65C
1985 850-T5
2001 V11 Sport Rosso Mandello Edition
2008 Stelvio 1200 4V
Own:
2003 California EV

Offline rutgery

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2020, 01:05:53 PM »
Uhm... the story seems a little strange... I live in Italy, if you don't pay the road tax you can't circulate, but if you accept to pay all past taxes (plus a fine), you can use the bike again...

Interesting! maybe the previous Italian owner thought the tax plus fine was too big to return the bike on the road? Anyhow, I'm glad it happened!

First up was the engine, the lower block was already assembled, so up next was installing the cilinders and pistons. The pistons all looked ok, as did the cilinders.



So on with the base gaskets!



Then the cilinders. I was surprised to see that the O-rings had to be installed under the heads.



Up next, part of the valvetrain was installed and the head nuts lubed and torqued to 29 - 32 ft lbs before installing the rocker arms.



Repeat on the other side, and then installed the valve covers just for the looks :cool: Oh also, the inside of the crankcase and sump were cleaned thoroughly as it collected quite a bit of hair and dust in the basement of the previous owner. But I didn't include a picture as you probably don't want to see that :laugh:




Well, that's it for the engine, now up to the flywheel. I was very surprised to see that the flywheel didn't have any other markings next to the arrow to install it when the Rh piston is at TDC. Then I checked the gearbox and sure enough, no hole! After checking the internet it seems none of the loops have this flywheel hole. Does anyone know why? that'd be useful for setting the timing just as well right?
Anyway, the arrow was lined up and the flywheel installed. Clutch plates in and ready to go!






The flywheel was marked on the flat face as well interestingly enough.




Up next was painting the frame in the professional painting shed :grin:



After mating the gearbox to the engine and litterally watching the paint dry, it was time for the engine and frame to reunite after 3 years! This frame sure is a hell of a lot harder to install the engine into than a tonti frame, but after a mere hour of struggeling it was finally in :thumb:





'82 Moto Guzzi G5
'89 V7 Sport replica from a Cali 3
'67 V7 700 #181 from the production line

Offline Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2020, 02:01:21 PM »
No timing hole in the case or timing marks on the flywheel because Loops are timed at the front of the engine. The rear half of the belt pulley should have at least a TDC mark on it, Ambassador (outer pulley half marked "10") and Eldorado (outer pulley half marked "5") had four marks (TDC, 1200 rpm, 2200 rpm and 3600 rpm). This aligns with an arrow cast into the timing cover.

The rear half of the pulley can go on any of three positions - correct and 120 degrees off either direction. Bring the left cylinder (as you sit astride the bike) up to TDC and align the TDC mark on the pulley with the arrow. Easy for it to get moved around when you tension the belt, so I use a cut off bolt as an aligning stud to keep it in position.
Charlie
http://www.AntietamClassicCycle.com
'67 Sears Allstate/Puch SR250
'69 V700
'69 Ambassador
'76 Convert
'77 Morini 3 1/2 Strada

Offline Klinkhammer

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #7 on: May 15, 2020, 02:31:56 PM »
Following! (and secretly dreaming of a loop frame)
V7 sport 1972
850T Endurance racer lookalike 1974
LM III 998 Agostini 1983

Offline Dave Swanson

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #8 on: May 15, 2020, 06:23:27 PM »
I filed notches in the pulley per Guzziology and painted them with white out for the strobe light.

Dave Swanson Northern IL
1968 V700
1973 V7 Sport
1974 Eldo
1977 Vert
1977 Lemans 1.2
1980 T3 California
1993 1000S - Sparklehorse
2004 V11S - Eraldo-ized
2015 Norge GT8V - Beetle-ized
2015 V7 Special - Beetle-ized
2016 Griso SE - Beetle-ized

2003 EVT - departed and now remorseful

MGNOC L-780

Offline rutgery

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #9 on: May 17, 2020, 04:50:17 AM »
No timing hole in the case or timing marks on the flywheel because Loops are timed at the front of the engine. The rear half of the belt pulley should have at least a TDC mark on it, Ambassador (outer pulley half marked "10") and Eldorado (outer pulley half marked "5") had four marks (TDC, 1200 rpm, 2200 rpm and 3600 rpm). This aligns with an arrow cast into the timing cover.

The rear half of the pulley can go on any of three positions - correct and 120 degrees off either direction. Bring the left cylinder (as you sit astride the bike) up to TDC and align the TDC mark on the pulley with the arrow. Easy for it to get moved around when you tension the belt, so I use a cut off bolt as an aligning stud to keep it in position.

Was this easier to produce or set the timing on the loops? It seems to me that the timing might just as well be marked on the flywheel as the tonti frames have, even more so as the larger diameter of the flywheel would make it more accurate?

I filed notches in the pulley per Guzziology and painted them with white out for the strobe light.



That's a really nice and tidey modification!

After fitting the engine in the frame, the assembly of the bike was next. It's always nice to look for the parts and install them on a frame, building up such an old motorcycle.















The carbs were ultrasonically cleaned and fitted with a new set of gaskets. The distributor was also completely in pieces so it was cleaned and assembled before fitting it on the bike. In hindsight, it may have been easier to fit when the engine was not yet fitted to the frame.




 

Then came the wiring. The wire insulation was completely falling apart and I don't want to risk runnning this in such a nice surviving bike.




A new wiring loom was ordered by Stein-Dinse but unfortunately it didn't include all wiring, so the wiring from the headlight to the dash hade to be made at home. I ran the new wires through the old sleeve.




All new wiring connected and it immediately looked a lot better under the dash.




The marelli dynamo was disassembled, cleaned, tested and reassembled but I unfortunately forgot to take any pictures. The same was done with the old marelli starter. Unfortunately the brushes were at the end of their life, so new ones had to be ordered. After some searching, none seemed to be available anywhere.. I really didn't want to replace this starter with a different type just for the brushes, so I looked at other starters from the same era and sure enough, brushes from an old Fiat were the exact same dimensions.












With the final things like cables and the electronic components fitted, the bike was finally in one piece! I also have the leg windshields and luggage cases which will be fitted on the bike when it's technically tested and proven. The paintwork unfortunately is not original, but I thought it'd be a shame to repaint this as well as it feels like this is how the bike should be.












The first start revealed only one true issue, and that is that the bike doesn't charge unless I jump a cable once to the stator of the dynamo (DF on the regulator (No. 25)). The dynamo gives off up to 2.5V on its own, which I believe should trigger the regulator to supply the stator with it's DF output. This doesn't happen unless I boost it with a lead once on DF. Has anyone else had this issue and/or does anyone know the intended treshhold for the regulator to start supplying current to the stator?






'82 Moto Guzzi G5
'89 V7 Sport replica from a Cali 3
'67 V7 700 #181 from the production line

Offline Klinkhammer

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Re: 1967 V7 700 ''puzzle''
« Reply #10 on: May 19, 2020, 11:04:50 AM »
First start is always a  :bow:
V7 sport 1972
850T Endurance racer lookalike 1974
LM III 998 Agostini 1983

 

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