Author Topic: Convert Model Year Differences  (Read 506 times)

Offline K-Man

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Convert Model Year Differences
« on: October 02, 2022, 02:30:11 PM »
Hello,

Does anybody have or know where there might posted a list of the differences / changes made to Converts throughout the various model years?

Thanks in advance!
K-Man
1971 CB750K1, 1976 Convert, 1977 CB750K7, 1978 R80/7, 1981 GS550T, 2016 CB500X

1975 CB200T, 1984 R65LS (Basket cases for a rainy day)

Online fotoguzzi

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #1 on: October 02, 2022, 02:31:13 PM »
Greg Fields book, Moto Guzzi big twins.
Yikes, $95 on eBay. I have a personalized autographed copy.. must be worth big bucks, LOL
« Last Edit: October 02, 2022, 02:35:17 PM by fotoguzzi »
MINNEAPOLIS, MN

Offline bigbikerrick

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #2 on: October 02, 2022, 04:39:21 PM »
 I know my 1976 has the beautiful , wire Borrani wheels , which was a prerequisite for me.Later bikes came with alloy wheels. Early bikes also had the stamped steel, failure prone flywheel . Im not sure what year they went to the cast flywheel. One thing I know for sure, is that Converts Rock,and every Guzzisti should have one!  Im sure others will chime in with more specific model year changes.                                                                                             

                                                                                                                            :popcorn:
                                                                                                           
   Rick D.
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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2022, 05:46:56 PM »
The stamped flywheel was only 1976. It can be reenforced and last a lifetime, you motor will spin up faster BTDT.the later heavy FW is 12 pounds.




« Last Edit: October 02, 2022, 05:47:53 PM by fotoguzzi »
MINNEAPOLIS, MN

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #3 on: October 02, 2022, 05:46:56 PM »

Offline bigbikerrick

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2022, 05:06:01 PM »
So,thats about a  2 lb difference in weight.....Hmm,that seems like quite a bit. I bet you can really feel that  on the "butt dyno"  :grin:
Rick.
"You meet the most interesting people on a Guzzi"

Online chuck peterson

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2022, 05:58:10 AM »
I believe there are really only two versions..

Early was wire wheels, vhb dellorto square carbs and single spring front forks

Later ones were cast wheels, roundslide phf dellorto carbs and a two part G5 fork springs giving a slightly higher from the ground triple clamp

Off the top of my head that’s it..except there were police models w additional wiring for lights/siren/flashers

Anyone else remember the differences?

Oh yeah, I’m not including the California II Converts which have an entirely different frame geometry with taller headstock, longer wheelbase, heavier swingarm…!

"I'd like to thank all my friends who have kept my Guzzi's going, but mostly...TOMB."
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1980 SP1000 in little bits and pieces

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2022, 07:52:16 AM »
So,thats about a  2 lb difference in weight.....Hmm,that seems like quite a bit. I bet you can really feel that  on the "butt dyno"  :grin:
Rick.
more like an 8-10 6 # difference
The light FW with ring gear is 6#



« Last Edit: October 04, 2022, 11:45:45 AM by fotoguzzi »
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Offline bigbikerrick

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2022, 12:56:35 AM »
I currently own a 76 Convert, and owned an 84 Cal II automatic for many years. The 76 is a noticeably more nimble bike, with a much lighter steering feel. The Cal II was like a freight train on the highway, though. Very stable, at speed and in crosswinds. Both are great bikes.
Rick.
"You meet the most interesting people on a Guzzi"

Online Antietam Classic Cycle

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2022, 09:29:29 AM »
There were numerous "running changes" to the Convert that can't be categorized as "model year" changes. The tank changed three times: metal flip cap, plastic flip top, then metal cover over a twist cap. Changes to the atf pump coupling and the pump itself. Three different flywheels: stamped bowl, machined with separate ring gear, machined with integral ring gear. Spoke then cast wheels. Iron liners, then Nigusil. VHBs then PHFs. Different switch gear. Different front master cylinders (trapezoidal vs. round). More that I'm probably forgetting...
« Last Edit: October 05, 2022, 07:25:18 PM by Antietam Classic Cycle »
Charlie

Offline Kiwi_Roy

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2022, 06:55:56 PM »
I currently own a 76 Convert, and owned an 84 Cal II automatic for many years. The 76 is a noticeably more nimble bike, with a much lighter steering feel. The Cal II was like a freight train on the highway, though. Very stable, at speed and in crosswinds. Both are great bikes.
Rick.
The most desirable model IMHO don't ask me why, its what I have
72 Eldorado
17 V7iii Special
76 Convert
Half a V9 Roamer

Moto Guzzi - making electricians out of riders since March 15 1921

Offline bigbikerrick

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #10 on: October 06, 2022, 01:26:34 PM »
The most desirable model IMHO don't ask me why, its what I have
                                                             



                                                                                                                 :thumb: :thumb:
"You meet the most interesting people on a Guzzi"

Online Bulldog9

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Re: Convert Model Year Differences
« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2022, 07:59:30 PM »
The most desirable model IMHO don't ask me why, its what I have

For whatever reason, there seem to be more 76 models. That's what I have and love it..... Don't know much about the details or history, but I do know mine has the spoked rims and stamped (thin) TC plate thing. I have no idea what the status of the drive pump hex thing is either, but it has 43K miles, and to my and the prior owners knowledge, neither have been messed with. I've had it 2 years, the PO had it 15, and he never touched either.  All I know is it works and works well. I do have one of the machined drive plates and ring gear, and a piece of hex if something goes awry.

I don't think it is stock, but my rear brake rotor is drilled. I also have a bunch of other changes, the airbox is removed and has a Type 3 (?) breather box, a full stainless exhaust from a Bassa and H pipe from a ????. I am also sans the horn covers (wing things) and rear cowl thing. Its a beauty and I love it.


I get a rare day off tomorrow before I am on a plane and back to the sandbox for work, plan to spend the day out on my Magic Carpet ride hunting foliage in Northern Kentucky......

MGNOC#23231
The Living: 1976 Convert, 2007 GRiSO, 2016 Stornello #742, 2008 1200 Sport
The Departed: 2017 MGX, 2014 Norge GT,  In Stasis: 1978 XS750, XS1100SF

 


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