Author Topic: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio  (Read 10386 times)

Offline leafman60

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Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« on: October 24, 2014, 03:39:54 PM »
Recently, I had a headlight bulb go bad during daylight hours and, of course, it burned out the Big Fuse behind the right side plastic cover. I didn't know anything was wrong until I happened to notice that my auxiliary lamps were dead. Thankfully, I didn't run long enough to deplete the battery to the point of being stranded.

This main fuse problem is a big one.  Even if you know it's a problem, it's a big problem. You have no way of knowing when the fuse is blown unless you are running at night and/or somehow happen to realize that you have no lighting - or alternator. There is no warning light that tells you the battery is not being charged!

This same fuse powers a main circuit that includes the headlamps, the auxiliary lamps and the alternator activator.  The more commonly known problem is for this fuse to blow due to vibration-induced chafing and shorting of the wires inside the auxiliary lamps. Again, during daylight, you may not know this has happened and that you not only have no lights but you have no functioning charge circuit to the battery.  Again, the Stelvio has no alternator light, no voltmeter, no indicator to alert you about this problem.

I fixed my H-4 bulb problem but I also installed a monitor light to indicate when this particular main circuit goes dead for whatever reason. If that big fuse blows, I now have a red warning light that comes on.

This is very simple.

I bought a 12VDC red led indicator lamp from Radio Shack and a standard lighting relay. I then used a connection to my switched accessory receptacle circuit to illuminate this red indicator lamp through the relay, terminals 30 and 87A.  I then made a connection to the main lighting/alternator circuit by slipping in a wire to the 87 terminal of the main lighting (logic) relay with the red band (see picture), 5th from the front on the right side of the bike, and used it to trigger the red indicator light relay at terminal 85 to cut the current from the accessory illuminating it (86 is grounded as is the negative wire from the red indicator lamp). I didn't drill a hole through the dash but I mounted the indicator lamp in a custom-made bracket that I sticky-taped to the dash.

Added note:

The correct terminal on the Main Lighting relay (red banded) will show:

1. Ignition key off                                 ----    no voltage
2. Ignition key on, engine not running    ----    no voltage
3. Ignition key on, engine running          ----   12+ volts
4. Engine running, Big Fuse pulled          ----   no voltage    


The thing works great.  

When I turn the ignition on, the accessory circuit lights up the led indicator lamp. It's bright, even in daylight. When the bike is started and the main lighting/alternator circuit comes on, that trigger wire from that main lighting/alternator circuit switches off the relay that controls the led indicator lamp. If, at any time the main lighting/alternator circuit goes dead, the led indicator light relay switches back and turns on the indicator light as powered from the accessory circuit that is not affected by the main lighting/alternator circuit.

Originally, I had contemplated breaking out the alternator circuit and installing a separate dedicated fuse for it. However, I realized that I wanted to know when either my lights were out or the charge circuit was dead.

Next, I used a popular led volt/battery meter and wired it to the same accessory connection that powers the main circuit warning light just described. I  mounted the voltmeter next to the circuit warning light and carefully positioned it so as not to hit the upper triple clamp when turning. Any sort of voltmeter could be used.  Now, I have all bases covered.

Voltmeter by Kuryakyn

http://www.jpcycles.com/product/ZZ38119

I'm warned by the red light if the Big Fuse blows and I'm also warned by the voltmeter if there is any other problem with the charging system.

By the way, while I was in there, I replaced all the 5-pin relays on the right side as preventative maintenance.

For now, this works for me. It's a simple fix and something the factory should have worked around from the beginning.

Main circuit red indicator lamp (off=good, on=bad) and the led system voltmeter



Controlling relay for indicator lamp


Relay bank on right side behind removable cover.  The red-banded relay to the left is the main lighting (logic?) relay. The same main circuit connects to more than one relay.


Stock relays are held in rubber sheaths.  Not the best water-proofing design.


I used these


And tried to rubber wrap the connectors for better protection



.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2014, 07:03:50 PM by leafman60 »

Online Kiwi_Roy

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor Light for Stelvio
« Reply #1 on: October 24, 2014, 05:34:59 PM »
Failsafe, I like it!
« Last Edit: August 25, 2015, 09:55:44 AM by Kiwi_Roy »
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Offline leafman60

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor Light for Stelvio
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2014, 10:17:10 AM »
Ok, the voltmeter is added.

Offline stick

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2014, 08:30:57 PM »
Nice work!   I removed my Hella driving lights shortly after buying my Stelvio in July 2013, thanks to this forum!  Then I saw an "alternate" mounting setup at IMOC in Sturbridge, MA.  So I made up my own mount for the lights.  This location, under the main headlamps, is basically mounted to the fairing.  Not the same vibrations that the crash bars gave them.  And I cleaned up the interior wiring on these Hella's, so that they have minimal chance of shorting out (plus the crazy vibes are gone!).

I also have a voltmeter...it's built into my Escort 8500 X50.  It's called the "pilot V" mode.  If it's not detecting radar, it displays voltage.

But I do like your LED light for the lighting/aux/alternator circuit.  I'll have to go thru the schematic to see what you're talking about.

Oh, I also mounted a cheap pair of 10W LED "spot" lights down on the crash bars.  I use them as DRL's.  I've already had some weaning problems with them, due to the crazy resonant vibes that hit the lamp-mount areas. 

Stick

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2014, 08:30:57 PM »

Mark33563

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #4 on: December 06, 2014, 11:40:30 PM »
I like that setup.  Was thinking along the same route with regards to wiring up a 'dummy' light to indicate that there is a charging problem.  Figured a relay with a normally closed circuit would work.  Similar to how the dummy light on an air cooled VW works.  I like the addition of the charging gauge.  Nice, small, and compact.

Is there a place where I can find a procedure on how to dismantle the front fairing on a 2009 Stelvio?  I would like to get in there to trouble shoot some electrical issues, install some new crap, and do some general clean up.

I sure would appreciate it.

--Mark

biking sailor

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2014, 10:14:29 AM »
All I use is a cheap digital volt meter that plugs into a cigarette lighter socket. Ride around a bit with that plugged in to get an idea of what different loads are doing to the charging system.  Could be used permanent with a switched power socket, but just periodic checks have been good enough for me. All of my bikes that have a lot of accessories also have a socket wired to the battery, some under the seat while others have one mounted on the dash or handle bars, so easy to check.

Winder

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2015, 04:12:33 PM »
Hello Folks,  1st post here .....  I am looking around for a new bike ... 2014/15 Stelvio is on my short list.   (This is likely an old thread?)   - but with my current KLR.... Mods are a way of life.

My solution for battery related issues was to purchase a kit with a small light that I attached to the dash and from there taped into the tail light circuit.  The light was green for a 12 volts, yellow for 11 volts and red for lower. 

Anyway,  just throwing this out there .... (seems similar to a couple of other solutions)

Winder 

Offline pyoungbl

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2015, 06:42:18 PM »
Taping into the tail light for a 12V check seems to me to be a bad idea.  If you really want to check the system it's best to check at the battery.  Any time you break into the wiring harness you run the risk of inducing problems.  Thankfully we do not have CAN bus systems because they are so sensitive to any add-on stuff.  Leafman60 has a good idea here, detect an electrical problem before it leaves you stranded on the side of the road.

Peter Y.
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Online Kiwi_Roy

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2015, 06:58:58 PM »
I think Winders idea of tapping into the tail light is ok for monitoring the battery, the tail light circuit is quite lightly loaded so the Voltage should be fairly close to the battery and it's switched off when not in use.

Winder,
           Leafman60's light is to warn of a different Stelvio problem, Alternator failure, as Peter Y pointed out it will give instant warning of a known fault that can leave you stranded.
Welcome to the Guzzi forum by the way :BEER:
« Last Edit: May 05, 2015, 07:02:24 PM by Kiwi_Roy »
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Offline Wayne Orwig

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2015, 08:11:43 PM »
Even better is to tap into the pilot light in the headlight housing. It is right there near where you will put the meter already.

I actually like connecting to the circuits way downstream. If you tie in too close to the battery, you may get a more accurate idea what the true battery voltage is, but you will have no idea that a connector/fuse/switch/relay is going bad on you. You can easy go down the road happy with a good battery voltage, while a poor connection melts a relay socket or ignition switch as I have often seen.
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andrewdonald1

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #10 on: May 06, 2015, 07:55:36 AM »
May I ask a question.
I haven't dug into the electrical on the Stelvio so this might be a little ignorant.

Why not just run a new dedicated fused circuit to the alternator and be done with it?
Wouldn't that just avoid the potential issue's all together? 

Remember, I am ignorant on the electrical system as a whole on the bike at the moment.

Boulder Ed

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #11 on: August 23, 2015, 07:32:40 AM »
Ok, so my new to me 2013 Stelvio with barely 2000 miles has had two events now in my first 300 miles of ownership, of running down battery voltage to first 7.8 as I sputtered into the driveway, and then 11.8 coming home and finding roughness and driveability problems, electronics functionality shutting down, beginning again.   As the bike is still under warranty, the Guzzi dealer has been great at fixing a couple common problems (replaced sagging mirrors with the Euro kit and replacing the lame hella aux lights with Rigid D2 HD's.  But now the dealer is replacing all the relays as apparently they have seen this before.

I found my Stelvio has a fully displayed voltmeter which is how I know the voltage issues.  Not sure why ya'll are adding voltmeters except for the fact that it goes away sometimes when the cluster is affected by low voltage and it is easier to see other functions employing a separate voltmeter.   I also know the feel of the bike as the electrical system degrades and engine smoothness and functionality goes away.  On my first occurrence it was daytime so I do not know if the headlight went out, but aux lights did.  The voltmeter read all the way from 14.4 down to 7.8 over a 30 mile ride; 12.4 to 7.8 over the last 22 miles.  With the second occurrence happening on the first ride after supposedly having been repaired, this happened: The headlight high beam goes out first, then the ATC icon comes on, and simultaneously you cannot access the voltmeter any longer and the last reading I saw was 11.8

Other things I discovered:  battery had leaked fluid and corroded terminals and even one fuse a bit.  I repaired all of that just prior to either event.  Battery will be replaced this week with a new one, after this second event.  Dealer says they have learned from experience to withhold one tablespoon of fluid when filling batteries and let them sit 24 hours to fully absorb before charging now and that helps prevent leakage down the road.  Sounds like a good tip.  It is technically supposed to be a "dry" battery but the Yuasa looks anything but dry to me.     

When I started the bike to put it into the trailer and haul it back to the dealer yet a second time, I saw 14.4 flash up on the now appearing voltmeter for about 5 seconds then it was gone again only to read "ATC"  which I think means the traction control is turned off.   The dealers first crack at the relay problem was simply to extract them and reinstall I believe- not any new parts.  And this fix lasted maybe 90 miles before it failed again.  The parts had to be ordered.  If I were on the road like I intend to be next month, this would be a disaster.  Not being able to ride my new bike for 4 weeks is taking its toll on my patience. 

So, now I am wondering if in addition to the battery  and relays replacement happening this week, if there are now some other loose connections (perhaps to the alternator or charging system somewhere) or whether this could be as the dealer believes, simply related to the relays. 

I'm new to Moto Guzzis having owned 65 bikes and maintained them all myself for over 700,000 miles.  Only once has a bike let me down on my long distance tours (yes it was a failed fuel pump on my 07' R1200GSA at only 4k miles (two months old), and I was nervous about reliability for the next 30000 miles!  80,000 miles later that bike still ran like new and had never had another issue.   I am really hoping this is a simple infant mortality problem on the Guzzi.  Sometimes bikes just like cars have a few things to sort when new.

Has anyone had any experience like this?  Will relays and a battery sort it out?  Are the Bosch relays better than what is in there now?  I've never had relays go bad before to be honest and given my bike is under warranty and I have been preoccupied, am trusting the dealer to get it right, and they are doing a great job getting stuff approved for repairs, but it takes three hours of my time to get the bike down and back each time  and the waiting for parts is eating up the summer.  I guess I will need to dig in and study up now as well to know where to look if problems occur while on the road.  I cant imagine carrying spare relays around. 

Thoughts?   

Offline Lannis

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #12 on: August 23, 2015, 07:41:55 AM »

I found my Stelvio has a fully displayed voltmeter which is how I know the voltage issues.  Not sure why ya'll are adding voltmeters except for the fact that it goes away sometimes when the cluster is affected by low voltage and it is easier to see other functions employing a separate voltmeter.   

My first thought when I re-read the thread ....

My dash will display the system voltage all the time on my '09 (I assume from somewhere near the battery but I don't know where it picks it up).

It's simple for me - if it's not displaying 13.8 volts when I'm going down the road, something is wrong ....?   What does a separate voltmeter do for me that this doesn't already do?    If I'm not really needing some other information like mileage, I just leave the display on "voltmeter" ....

Lannis
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Offline pyoungbl

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #13 on: August 23, 2015, 08:12:29 AM »
Ed, sorry to hear that you are having electrical problems with the Stelvio.  My '12 is basically an identical bike.  From 2,000 miles away I'll take the liberty of trying to help figure out your problem.  The most probable cause is the same charging issue Leafman60 talks about.  A short from the aux lights blows the 30A fuze.  Of course you know that the 30A fuze is located behind a triangular plastic cover on the right side of the bike...just under the seat.

 Next is the battery.  The NTX has a battery that must be installed in a near horizontal orientation.  Too bad the battery Guzzi chose for this application is not recommended for horizontal placement...the manufacturer says don't do it!  You really need to install a different battery, one that is made to be installed this way.

Peter Y.

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Cheifhbw

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #14 on: August 23, 2015, 01:24:29 PM »
Wish I had read this post before I took my Stelvio to the shop for not charging. Even the dealer didn't know about the other fuses under the side cover. Unfortunately I missed riding most of the summer. But my local all bike shop {Union County Cycle} knows more about my bike than my dealer. I've already  worked on replacing the driving lights with something else. {Bought some LED lights at the truck stop}. :Beating_A_Dead_Hors e_by_liviu

Offline Demar

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #15 on: August 23, 2015, 01:57:07 PM »
Can't you just monitor the charging volt display on the dash?
I'd much rather ask for forgiveness than ask for permission.

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Offline Lannis

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #16 on: August 23, 2015, 01:59:49 PM »
Can't you just monitor the charging volt display on the dash?

Yeah, I asked that but no one is answering.

I think they're slapping their forehead and saying "You mean there's a CHARGING VOLT DISPLAY?  DANG!"

Lannis
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Offline leafman60

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #17 on: August 23, 2015, 02:10:56 PM »
Yes you can monitor any voltage meter already on the bike or an auxiliary meter from a radar detector or a stand alone gauge attached to the bike. The problem is constantly paying attention to the readout.

A red light that comes on gets your attention immediately and then allows you to direct your attention to the voltmeter to see how much life is left in your battery. Also, having this warning allows you to toggle your readouts to other information that you may desire without having to constantly monitor your voltage read out.

Offline Lannis

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #18 on: August 23, 2015, 02:14:18 PM »
Yes you can monitor any voltage meter already on the bike or an auxiliary meter from a radar detector or a stand alone gauge attached to the bike. The problem is constantly paying attention to the readout.

A red light that comes on gets your attention immediately and then allows you to direct your attention to the voltmeter to see how much life is left in your battery. Also, having this warning allows you to toggle your readouts to other information that you may desire without having to constantly monitor your voltage read out.

Thanks!!  I was hoping that was the answer ......

Lannis
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Offline Bonafide Bob

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #19 on: August 23, 2015, 02:38:11 PM »
My first thought when I re-read the thread ....

My dash will display the system voltage all the time on my '09 (I assume from somewhere near the battery but I don't know where it picks it up).

It's simple for me - if it's not displaying 13.8 volts when I'm going down the road, something is wrong ....?   What does a separate voltmeter do for me that this doesn't already do?    If I'm not really needing some other information like mileage, I just leave the display on "voltmeter" ....

Lannis

 Mine is displaying 13.4 is that telling me something is wrong?

We have freedom of speech, as long as we don't say to much.

Offline Lannis

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #20 on: August 23, 2015, 02:46:48 PM »

 Mine is displaying 13.4 is that telling me something is wrong?


I wouldn't think so.   13.8 volts just happens to be the number that:

1) My gauge picks up with ...  2) The battery I'm using with ... 3) The alternator and regulator I have with .... 4) The electrical load I run and .... 5) The condition that my wiring and grounds are in.

I don't think the exact number is important at all, as long as it charges the battery under the conditions under which you run it.

The important thing is that it be CONSISTENT.   If MY voltmeter suddenly started reading 13.2 volts all the time, and I knew I hadn't installed heated grips or new running lights or something, I'd get my multimeter and start hunting for who stole my missing volts, even though the bike might keep running.

And if it started reading 12.4 volts, I'd get home ASAP, or call the breakdown truck if I'm across the country, and get to work tracing relays, load test the battery, etc ....

"Change" on something like this is NOT a good sign.

Lannis
« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 02:48:31 PM by Lannis »
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Offline leafman60

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #21 on: August 23, 2015, 04:08:32 PM »
Turn off accessories and aux lights and rev it or run it highway speeds and see what voltage is showing.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 04:39:09 PM by leafman60 »

Offline Bonafide Bob

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #22 on: August 23, 2015, 04:52:26 PM »
Turn off accessories and aux lights and rev it or run it highway speeds and see what voltage is showing.

With everything turned off at the start of ride is was showing 13.3/13.4 near home it changed 13.5.
  It didn't seem to change with I turned the spots on.

 A little history I left the parking lights a few weeks ago and ran the battery down, it charged up, but it did take a long time to get to full charge.

Bob
« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 04:53:36 PM by Bonafide Bob »
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Offline leafman60

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #23 on: August 23, 2015, 09:39:21 PM »
Without knowing more details, I think you are probably just fine as long as the bike does keep the voltage up to those levels when you are running some of the auxiliaries. If the voltage tends to drop significantly below those levels then you may have a problem with the battery pulling too much of a load to charge but I wouldn't jump to that conclusion yet. Just ride it and watch the voltmeter for a while and see what happens. If you have a problem it'll show up

Note PYoungs comments about the stock batteries and the problems that have occurred with them. I changed mine out to a MotoBatt AGM about 2 years ago.
« Last Edit: August 23, 2015, 09:43:04 PM by leafman60 »

Offline pyoungbl

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #24 on: August 23, 2015, 09:52:13 PM »
The alternator on the NTX cranks out loads of electrons....as long as that alternator is getting excited.  If you lose the exciter you lose all charge and suddenly are running off the battery alone.  This can happen in an instant.

 You are happily rolling along hour after hour and really putting on the miles.  All indications are rosy and that little voltage readout has been steady for so long that you really don't pay much attention to it, and why would you after all these happy hours?  Then you notice that the instruments are not reading correctly, the bike starts to stumble and maybe the headlights go out.  In a finstant you are stuck on the side of the road with a dead bike.  Leafman60 can tell this tale better than I can since it happened to him.  All it takes is to blow that 30A fuze.

As for the voltage, anything below 14V and much above 13V is OK, in my humble opinion.  On the NTX there is so much reserve power output that I can't see how you can run enough electrical stuff to make a difference as long as the alternator is excited and the engine is running.  The voltage regulator will sense the load and take care of the problem.  What we are talking about is not excessive load on the system but, rather, a lack of generated electricity.
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Offline Bonafide Bob

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #25 on: August 24, 2015, 04:36:05 AM »
Without knowing more details, I think you are probably just fine as long as the bike does keep the voltage up to those levels when you are running some of the auxiliaries. If the voltage tends to drop significantly below those levels then you may have a problem with the battery pulling too much of a load to charge but I wouldn't jump to that conclusion yet. Just ride it and watch the voltmeter for a while and see what happens. If you have a problem it'll show up

Note PYoungs comments about the stock batteries and the problems that have occurred with them. I changed mine out to a MotoBatt AGM about 2 years ago.

Thanks, I have been thinking about getting a MotoBatt AGM.
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Offline Bonafide Bob

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #26 on: August 24, 2015, 04:38:08 AM »
The alternator on the NTX cranks out loads of electrons....as long as that alternator is getting excited.  If you lose the exciter you lose all charge and suddenly are running off the battery alone.  This can happen in an instant.

 You are happily rolling along hour after hour and really putting on the miles.  All indications are rosy and that little voltage readout has been steady for so long that you really don't pay much attention to it, and why would you after all these happy hours?  Then you notice that the instruments are not reading correctly, the bike starts to stumble and maybe the headlights go out.  In a finstant you are stuck on the side of the road with a dead bike.  Leafman60 can tell this tale better than I can since it happened to him.  All it takes is to blow that 30A fuze.

As for the voltage, anything below 14V and much above 13V is OK, in my humble opinion.  On the NTX there is so much reserve power output that I can't see how you can run enough electrical stuff to make a difference as long as the alternator is excited and the engine is running.  The voltage regulator will sense the load and take care of the problem.  What we are talking about is not excessive load on the system but, rather, a lack of generated electricity.
Thanks
  Bob
We have freedom of speech, as long as we don't say to much.

Offline pyoungbl

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #27 on: August 24, 2015, 09:09:35 AM »
Not a NTX problem but my V7 Special was putting 14-15V into the battery!  I discovered this when I installed a monitor in the electrical system.  That led to changing the voltage regulator (actually a rectifier/regulator, but that's splitting hairs) so now I'm seeing a steady charge rate at speed and at idle the system does not keep up with heated gear.  This is good to know so I (1) don't boil the battery dry and (2) am aware of the low speed limitations of the electrical system on that bike.  Without the meter I'd be completely unaware of this issue.

Peter Y.
Growing old ain't for sissies.

'13 V7 Special (red/white)

Boulder Ed

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2015, 05:02:32 AM »

And if it started reading 12.4 volts, I'd get home ASAP, or call the breakdown truck if I'm across the country, and get to work tracing relays, load test the battery, etc ....

"Change" on something like this is NOT a good sign.

Lannis
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Mine reads 14.4 with the OEM battery.  Change now sends shivers up by back.  I have twice watched it crash downward.  First time to 7.8 V; second time to 11.8 before losing the voltmeter functionality (displaced by "ATC " message).  Today I should pick it up from the dealer with new relays and new battery.  Mine leaked for sure making a mess of things.  I believe the dealer will replace the stocker with another Yuasa.  Maybe I need "terminal condoms" :-) until I get a true dry cell in there. 

MG has been good about fixing the problems.  And from reading a number of posts early this a.m.  I can say that BMW roadside service is no better than what others have claimed about Moto Guzzi.  I found out in the middle of Wyoming,  on a R1200GSA with 4K on the clock due to a bad fuel pump, that I had to confess to the dealer "yes sir, I rode my bad ass GSA in the rain".  After that it ran 80K flawless miles before I bought the Stelvio.

Offline EagleOne

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Re: Lighting/Alternator/Charging Circuit Monitor for Stelvio
« Reply #29 on: August 28, 2015, 07:41:26 AM »
 :thewife:
There is a voltmeter built into the dashboard, you just have to look through some of the menus to show it in the lower part of the display.

Keep the rubber side down

Stelvio NTX 2010

 

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