Author Topic: Rollerisation of the 8V.  (Read 65248 times)

Vasco DG

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Rollerisation of the 8V.
« on: August 09, 2015, 12:58:46 AM »
OK this will be an ongoing thread as I don't think I've actually got pics of the whole process but let's start off by looking at what is involved with getting the heads off and put to bed some of these nonsense stories about the 'Complexity' of the 8V!

Obviously what you have to remove to get to the heads varies from model to model. A Norge for instance obviously has more crap to remove than a Griso. First night though is to get the tank and any fairings or panels that need removing to expose the heads. Once you have access to the whole top end of the motor then you can begin.

Note that I will be using a variety of pictures from various engine work to illustrate this. It isn't simply a 'Start to Finish' one bike affair. For the sake of argument we will also be working on the principle we are doing a 'C' or 'D' kit as these require removal of the heads. For the 'A' and 'B' kits the heads can be left in place.

Righty Ho then. First pull the header pipes and unscrew the intake manifolds from the heads. No need to remove the throttle bodies they can just sit there in the trumpets from the air box.

From there whip the HT lead covers off and pull the HT leads and plug caps and then the spark plugs.

From here it doesn't matter which side you do first but I always start on the left.

Set the piston up at TDC compression just as you would if you were going to set the valve clearances.

Next thing is that on the back of the LH barrel there is a small6mm thread, 4mm hex dome headed Allen bolt. You can see it in this pic of a motor on the bench.



Note there is no corresponding screw on the RH cylinder.this is because on the right you can easily access the tensioner plunger. This has to be removed. Use a VERY good Allen key because it will be tight and will want to round out if you don't use an accurate key. If that happens you have to chisel it out. You don't want to have to do that if the engine is in the frame because it's a cow of a job.

Once the bolt is out you have to perform the most tiresome part of the whole operation. The camchain is tensioned by a hydraulic tensioner that presses against a pivoting blade. Be warned this blade is VERY frangible and if you break it it's an engine out job to replace it. It has to be bled down to loosen the chain and to do this you need to slide a thin, flat bladed screwdriver down between the chain and the tensioner blade and then lever slowly but inexorably on the blade until the tensioner blade pushes away from the chain. As it collapses the tensioner plunger the screwdriver can be slipped down further to help keep the pressure closer to the plunger. Eventually the blade will be back far enough and a small Allen key or other such prong can be pushed through the bolt hole in the back of the cylinder, through a corresponding hole in the tensioner blade and into a notch on the other side of the camchain tunnel in the barrel. This then holds the tensioner so that the chain is now loose.

Here's a not very good pic of me playing the game. I'll see if I can find a better one later.

Sorry, more later.




In the above pic you can see that the bolt that retains the oil flinger and sprocket to the cam has been removed. Why I can't remember but in *your* job undoing that bolt and removing the the flinger is the next item on the list. The best way to achieve this is to use a 24mm socket and bar on the front crank nut to prevent the crank from spinning and then use a 10mm socket and ratchet on the cam bolt. Note that these bolts always seem to have been done up to about a trillion ft/lbs at the factory and it's a really good idea to crack them with a six point socket rather than trying with a 12 pointer as a 12 pointer will have a tendency to slip off and mullah the head of the bolt. Once cracked off they will spin out easily enough.

Once the bolt and flinger plate are out the sprocket is exposed. Note that the 'Pin' that indexes the cam to the sprocket is at six o'clock, in one with the centreline of the cylinder.



While both sprockets for left and right cylinders are identical they have two indexing holes in them marked 'L' and 'R' , (Rather than the traditional 'S' and 'D'.) it's a good idea to check that these are visible as they can be rather faint. If you have any doubts mark the relevant hole with a permanent marker of some sort. You don't want to re-time it to the wrong hole!

Once you have established this you can wriggle the sprocket off the end of the camshaft. I'd you are installing an 'A' or 'B' kit you can leave the chain on the sprocket and simply cable-tie it to the side of the head. As the head doesn't have to come off.



If you are continuing on to pull the head though you now extract the sprocket from the chain and remove it and the chain can be dropped down the tunnel. Don't worry, it can't disappear inextricably into the bowels of the motor. Once the head is off you can fish it out again! :D

From here getting the cambox and head off is easy as pie. Once agin on this engine I performed this task out of sequence for some reason as the pic below shows the sprocket still on the cam but the next step is to loosen the two long bolts (8mm head, 6mm shank.) that clamp the back of the cam chain tunnel. It's important to do these first, before the main head stud nuts are loosened otherwise the head casting may deform risking leaks on reassembly.


« Last Edit: August 09, 2015, 12:08:23 PM by Vasco DG »

Online Wayne Orwig

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #1 on: August 09, 2015, 08:16:45 AM »
This will be very helpful. Thanks.
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Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2015, 12:09:10 PM »
OK this will be an ongoing thread as I don't think I've actually got pics of the whole process but let's start off by looking at what is involved with getting the heads off and put to bed some of these nonsense stories about the 'Complexity' of the 8V!

Obviously what you have to remove to get to the heads varies from model to model. A Norge for instance obviously has more crap to remove than a Griso. First night though is to get the tank and any fairings or panels that need removing to expose the heads. Once you have access to the whole top end of the motor then you can begin.

Note that I will be using a variety of pictures from various engine work to illustrate this. It isn't simply a 'Start to Finish' one bike affair. For the sake of argument we will also be working on the principle we are doing a 'C' or 'D' kit as these require removal of the heads. For the 'A' and 'B' kits the heads can be left in place.

Righty Ho then. First pull the header pipes and unscrew the intake manifolds from the heads. No need to remove the throttle bodies they can just sit there in the trumpets from the air box.

From there whip the HT lead covers off and pull the HT leads and plug caps and then the spark plugs.

From here it doesn't matter which side you do first but I always start on the left.

Set the piston up at TDC compression just as you would if you were going to set the valve clearances.

Next thing is that on the back of the LH barrel there is a small6mm thread, 4mm hex dome headed Allen bolt. You can see it in this pic of a motor on the bench.



Note there is no corresponding screw on the RH cylinder.this is because on the right you can easily access the tensioner plunger. This has to be removed. Use a VERY good Allen key because it will be tight and will want to round out if you don't use an accurate key. If that happens you have to chisel it out. You don't want to have to do that if the engine is in the frame because it's a cow of a job.

Once the bolt is out you have to perform the most tiresome part of the whole operation. The camchain is tensioned by a hydraulic tensioner that presses against a pivoting blade. Be warned this blade is VERY frangible and if you break it it's an engine out job to replace it. It has to be bled down to loosen the chain and to do this you need to slide a thin, flat bladed screwdriver down between the chain and the tensioner blade and then lever slowly but inexorably on the blade until the tensioner blade pushes away from the chain. As it collapses the tensioner plunger the screwdriver can be slipped down further to help keep the pressure closer to the plunger. Eventually the blade will be back far enough and a small Allen key or other such prong can be pushed through the bolt hole in the back of the cylinder, through a corresponding hole in the tensioner blade and into a notch on the other side of the camchain tunnel in the barrel. This then holds the tensioner so that the chain is now loose.

Here's a not very good pic of me playing the game. I'll see if I can find a better one later.

Sorry, more later.




In the above pic you can see that the bolt that retains the oil flinger and sprocket to the cam has been removed. Why I can't remember but in *your* job undoing that bolt and removing the the flinger is the next item on the list. The best way to achieve this is to use a 24mm socket and bar on the front crank nut to prevent the crank from spinning and then use a 10mm socket and ratchet on the cam bolt. Note that these bolts always seem to have been done up to about a trillion ft/lbs at the factory and it's a really good idea to crack them with a six point socket rather than trying with a 12 pointer as a 12 pointer will have a tendency to slip off and mullah the head of the bolt. Once cracked off they will spin out easily enough.

Once the bolt and flinger plate are out the sprocket is exposed. Note that the 'Pin' that indexes the cam to the sprocket is at six o'clock, in one with the centreline of the cylinder.



While both sprockets for left and right cylinders are identical they have two indexing holes in them marked 'L' and 'R' , (Rather than the traditional 'S' and 'D'.) it's a good idea to check that these are visible as they can be rather faint. If you have any doubts mark the relevant hole with a permanent marker of some sort. You don't want to re-time it to the wrong hole!

Once you have established this you can wriggle the sprocket off the end of the camshaft. I'd you are installing an 'A' or 'B' kit you can leave the chain on the sprocket and simply cable-tie it to the side of the head. As the head doesn't have to come off.



If you are continuing on to pull the head though you now extract the sprocket from the chain and remove it and the chain can be dropped down the tunnel. Don't worry, it can't disappear inextricably into the bowels of the motor. Once the head is off you can fish it out again! :D

From here getting the cambox and head off is easy as pie. Once agin on this engine I performed this task out of sequence for some reason as the pic below shows the sprocket still on the cam but the next step is to loosen the two long bolts (8mm head, 6mm shank.) that clamp the back of the cam chain tunnel. It's important to do these first, before the main head stud nuts are loosened otherwise the head casting may deform risking leaks on reassembly.



Once they are loose you can crack off the four main 15mm flange nuts that retain the cambox to the head studs. These can be very tight, much tighter than the recommended 30ft/lbs I reckon! (Yes, sorry, this is the RH head but you get the picture!)



(Before anyone notices and asks this engine had already been rollerised as can be seen by the cambox castings which have two spark plug tunnels. Unfortunately the failing tappets had done for the big ends, hence the full engine strip.)

Once the four nuts have been removed the two previously loosened long clamping bolts can also be removed. Note they have washers under the heads.

As of now the camboxes and heads are 'Loose'. The only thing retaining them is the dowels on the two studs that take oil delivery to the cambox and rockers. Gentle prying will separate the cambox from the head.



And it can be lifted off the studs.



From there it is simply a matter of sticking your fingers in the ports and wriggling the head off the dowels between the head and barrel and lifting it off!



Note that between both barrel and head and head and cambox there are dowels. Take great care not to loose them as they can come loose and drop out. If they separate while the cambox or head are being removed there is a chance they could drop down the cam chain tunnel. You don't want that.


Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2015, 12:11:39 PM »
Sorry about the double post. I'm still having a few problems with loading stuff up.

Wildgoose Chase Moto Guzzi

Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2015, 12:11:39 PM »

Offline Chuck in Indiana

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #4 on: August 09, 2015, 12:13:37 PM »
Thanks for the gearhead porn..  :thumb:  :popcorn:
Chuck in (Elwood) Indiana/sometimes SoCal

02 Scura RC
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I think senility is going to be a fairly smooth transition for me..

Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #5 on: August 09, 2015, 12:31:20 PM »
This is the engine that had two of those poxy O2 sensor foolers on it. Virtually every moving part was knackered. Check out the camchain. The long one is the old one the short one is the new one!



Sump was lovely!



Ring end gap was 100 thou!



Pete

« Last Edit: August 09, 2015, 12:35:10 PM by Vasco DG »

Offline lucian

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #6 on: August 09, 2015, 12:57:05 PM »
Well done Pete, can't thank you enough for taking the time to do this.   dave

Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #7 on: August 09, 2015, 07:18:30 PM »
Probably easier if I continue this in 'Chunks' as editing the first post is a PITA.

So where whew we? Ah that's right, we have the heads off.

When doing a 'C' or 'D' kit you have to put the shims under the spring seats which requires removal of the valve springs and valves. To do this you need a compressor and if you aren't familiar with how to do this nod don't have a compressor it is probably cheaper and easier to just take the heads, one at a time, to a shop and ask them to do it but.......

Using the compressor you compress the valve spring until you can pull the collets, (What you in Yanquis Land call 'Keepers' I believe?) off the valve stem with a magnet or magnetic tipped screwdriver.



The collets are tiny. Don't loose them!



The compressor can then be released so the spring can relax and then it and the cap can be removed.





The valve guide oil seal then has to be pried off the guide to allow removal of the bottom valve spring seat.



Allowing the figment of the valve spring shim.





Here are the valve, spring seat and shim.



After the seat is back on top of the shim a new valve guide oil seal can be installed, (They just press on.), the valve can be slipped back in and the spring, cap and collets re installed in a reverse of disasembly. Make sure that the lips of the collets are in the groove in the valve. I stick them in place with a bit of grease. Once the spring has been released clean off excess grease carefully and inspect to make 100% certain the collets are installed correctly. Then get a small hammer and rap directly on the tip of the valve a few times while supporting the head in such a way that as the valve moves it doesn't hit the bench. This will ensure the collets are correctly seated, or, if they aren't, tha cap and collets will fire off across the workshop like bullets as the collets get spat out of their grooves! :evil:

Repeat the process for the other inlet valve.








Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #8 on: August 09, 2015, 09:52:18 PM »
Movin' right along we can now start the reassembly and cam box swap.

Grab a new head gasket of the correct thickness. If you don't have suitable measuring tools and the gasket isn't marked, (They are colour coded nowadays.) just use the middle thickness one. The very precise squish setting is principally to reduce oxides of nitrogen and has little to no effect on performance. Make sure the mating surfaces of both head and barrel are squeaky clean and that the dowels are in place and gently lower the head back onto the studs. Wriggle it to engage it on the dowels and press it home. Note it is vital that the piston be left at TDC for timing purposes. Also while doing this make sure you have got hold of the camchain and fed it back up the tunnel as the head goes on. You can, once the head is on the dowels, cable tie it to the side of the head.

You can now take the old cambox and undo the two screws in the centre of the rocker retainer. That would be those two Allen bolts on the left in this pic. Whoops, that didn't work. Here's another pic. You can see the bolts I mean with the earthing tang installed under them.




This allows you to remove the top plate after which the rockers can be slipped up towards the cam and wriggled out. Remove the plate from the roller cambox and liberally smear the bearings with assembly lube before sliding the rockers into place in the new cambox and bolting the top plate back on again. When you do this don't forget to add the new earthing tang under the bolts! Don't worry too much about how tight you do them up. Just nip them up. You can tighten them much more easily once the cambox is back on the head.

Before you install the cambox back on the studs make sure that the dowels between head and cambox are in place and that you have installed the hemispherical 'Pads' in the ends of the rockers.

As you can see the tops of the roller tappets are flat. As they move in a purely linear fashion but the rocker moves in an arc there will be a need for the rocker to move side to side in relation to the tappet. With the flat tappet set up this small deviation was catered for by the tiny pushrods betwixt tappet and rocker. With the roller set up the hemispherical pads perform this function by sliding and rotating on top of the (?) tower of the tappet assembly.

'Pads' and earthing tangs.



And the 'Pad' on top of the tappet as it sits in service.



The way I do it is I glue the 'Pads' into the rockers with assembly lube and then simply pick the cambox up keeping pressure on the rockers so they can't fall out and slip it down onto the head studs. Once again ensure both the dowels are in place between the head and cambox. Once the cambox is on the pads can't fall out.

Once the cambox is in place the screw and locknut las adjusters can be loosened off so that the valve spring pressure doesn't interfere with the torque settings and the four 15mm head nuts can be installed and torqued in two stages in a crosshatch patern to 30 ft/lbs. then the rocker retaining plate bolts can be tightened properly to 20-22 ft lbs. The long camchain tunnel clamping bolts can then be re-installed, along with their washers and tightened down. Can't offhand remember the torque setting, probably 8 to 10 ft/lbs. I do it by feel as I do with any 6mm bolt into alloy.







« Last Edit: August 09, 2015, 10:12:56 PM by Vasco DG »

Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #9 on: August 09, 2015, 10:30:30 PM »
From here it's all a coast to the finish.

Pop the cam sprocket back in the chain, ensure that the peg in the cam is at 6 o'clock and move the chain around the teeth of the sprocket until the sprocket will slip back onto the cam. Make CERTAIN that you use the correct timing hole, in this case the left one. Reinstall the flinger plate and the sprocket retainer bolt. Make sure that that one of the un-necessary holes in the flinger plate doesn't line up with the locator peg. I don't even know why the holes are there, it's stupid! I use 243 on the bolt as well.

Once the bolt is tight the key holding back the tensioner blade can be removed and the small dome head screw with alloy washer used to blank the hole can be re-installed.

Set the valve lash, pop the head cover back on. Go round to the right hand side.

One thing I forgot was the cooling oil feed to the heads. This is delivered by two large, 19mm hex, banjo bolts to the inside of the heads in the valley. Obviously this has to be disconnected before you can pull the head. Sorry. That needs reconnecting too.

On the right hand side the procedure is identical apart from the fact that rather than having to push back the tensioner blade and hold it out of the way with a peg you simply remove the cover over the tensioner plunger in the inside of the Vee in the valley. This takes the tension off the chain without any of the jiggers pokery required on the left.

I do hope this puts to bed some of the hair-tearing associated with the 'Complexity' of the 8V. It really is a delightfully simple old dunger and no more complicated to work on than the old pushrod lump.

Any questions?

Pete
« Last Edit: August 09, 2015, 10:33:21 PM by Vasco DG »

SteveAZ

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #10 on: August 09, 2015, 10:45:30 PM »
No questions yet but thank you. I refuse to die without owning an 8V Griso and this thread debunks the idea that the top end of 8V is full of delicate little bits made of glass and pixie wings. It's still robust and very Guzzi looking. Except maybe those collets but never mind that.

The mapping work by beetle helps  make the whole package that much sweeter as well.

Time to start saving the extra dollars and getting ready for a second bike.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2015, 10:46:32 PM by SteveAZ »

Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2015, 10:50:23 PM »
They're as tough and robust as they ever were Steve. As I've said before the tappet problems are usually the result of two things. Poor servicing and climate.

Pixie wings? (Snort!) :evil:

Pete.

Offline lucian

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2015, 06:06:56 AM »
Bravo! :thumb: :thumb: :thumb: :thumb:

Offline Chuck in Indiana

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #13 on: August 10, 2015, 07:33:20 AM »
Call me dense, but what's the purpose of the valve spring shim?
Chuck in (Elwood) Indiana/sometimes SoCal

02 Scura RC
87 AeroLario
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I think senility is going to be a fairly smooth transition for me..

Offline Silver Goose

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #14 on: August 10, 2015, 07:59:02 AM »
Pete, again, you have taken some of the mystery out of a job most have heard about. Your pictures and comments are as clear as possible.

Thank you, Pete!

Good Luck
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Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #15 on: August 10, 2015, 08:02:40 AM »
The roller tappet assemblies are heavier than the flat tappet and pushrod set up. Adding the shim increases the seating poundage slightly one presumes to reduce the risk of float at higher rpm. One assumes a boffin did the sums and decided that the smaller exhaust valves didn't have enough mass to make them necessary but having said that some mid period stelvios have shims under the exhaust seats as well :rolleyes:. Don't ask me. I just work here..... :grin:

Pete

Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #16 on: August 10, 2015, 08:43:03 AM »
Oh, and one last 'Scary' pic so you can see how terribly complicated they are! :grin:



There really isn't any more to them than the old ones. :thumb:

Pete

Offline Phang

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #17 on: August 10, 2015, 08:47:19 AM »
Pete,  can you show us the close up photo of the shimmed head with dimple drilled/punched on the cleavage side?

Thanks  :popcorn:
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2000 V11 Sport (Green)
1973 V7 Sport (Green)

Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #18 on: August 10, 2015, 08:57:53 AM »
I don't think I've got one handy. I'll have a look. I'll be rollerising Mark's bike in early September and his is a 'B' kit bike so I'll be able to get a pig then. It's just a 'Spot' in the paint adjacent to the date stamp.

Pete

Offline Phang

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #19 on: August 10, 2015, 09:02:44 AM »
I don't think I've got one handy. I'll have a look. I'll be rollerising Mark's bike in early September and his is a 'B' kit bike so I'll be able to get a pig then. It's just a 'Spot' in the paint adjacent to the date stamp.

Pete

It's fine Pete, I am just curious to see the sneaky work done by the Mandello factory :laugh:
2009 Griso 8V SE Tenni (Green)
2000 V11 Sport (Green)
1973 V7 Sport (Green)

beetle

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #20 on: August 10, 2015, 04:49:19 PM »
If I may be so bold...


Vasco DG

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #21 on: August 10, 2015, 04:56:44 PM »
That be them.

Pete

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #22 on: August 10, 2015, 05:38:22 PM »
Outstanding instructions and thanks for taking the time.  :thumb:

Offline canuck1969

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #23 on: October 09, 2015, 07:23:04 AM »
Pete,

What is the purpose of the valve shims for the C/D kits (other than to shim a valve :grin:...ie why do they need to be shimmed).  My friends 2010 Stelvio rollerization was done at the dealer and now it is drinking gas like water.  His fuel consumption went up 20 to 30% in some situations. Wondering if perhaps they did not do all the required steps, or missed a couple of shims as there is a knock for about 3 seconds after startup and decel popping (on the stock maps) no mater what the temp of the engine is.

This is running the new stock 42 map, tried the old flat tappet 52 map just for fun and even some of the roller custom maps and all yield significantly higher fuel consumption than when the flat tappets were in.  Any ideas or is this normal on the single lambda bike rollerizations.  With the small tank on the 2010 is really kills the range of the bike.
« Last Edit: October 09, 2015, 07:23:59 AM by canuck1969 »

Offline lucian

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #24 on: October 09, 2015, 08:12:08 AM »
The roller tappet assemblies are heavier than the flat tappet and pushrod set up. Adding the shim increases the seating poundage slightly one presumes to reduce the risk of float at higher rpm. One assumes a boffin did the sums and decided that the smaller exhaust valves didn't have enough mass to make them necessary but having said that some mid period stelvios have shims under the exhaust seats as well :rolleyes:. Don't ask me. I just work here..... :grin:

I read this      somewhere. :huh:

Offline cruzziguzzi

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #25 on: October 09, 2015, 10:04:56 AM »
Having taken the time to photo-document a couple of projects for people - I too, want to thank you for the extra time taken to get this project recorded.

What do you suppose is the reason for that excess ring end-gap? Poor ring selection/prep. Did the bore get run out that much?

I don't know that I'll ever have an 8 valve, but know neither that I won't. I hope this is still around if ever I do get one.

Todd.
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Online Wayne Orwig

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #26 on: October 09, 2015, 10:12:34 AM »
What do you suppose is the reason for that excess ring end-gap? Poor ring selection/prep. Did the bore get run out that much?

I don't know that I'll ever have an 8 valve, but know neither that I won't. I hope this is still around if ever I do get one.

READ the header for those photos.
That is just a couple of photos that Vasco tossed in from another bike. The owner had installed O2 sensor modifiers. It caused the bike to run way too rich, which caused a LOT of wear.
Scientist have discovered that people will believe anything, if you first say "Scientists have discovered...."

Offline cruzziguzzi

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #27 on: October 09, 2015, 10:28:10 AM »
READ the header for those photos.
That is just a couple of photos that Vasco tossed in from another bike. The owner had installed O2 sensor modifiers. It caused the bike to run way too rich, which caused a LOT of wear.

I SAW and READ the header and am still asking how that results in the ring gap?

Not a challenge, merely simple curiosity. Potentially stretching the chain I can cypher out for myself but am not too clear on possible effects on the ring dimensions. Is the ring smaller, the bore bigger, bad Luigied rings in the first place?

Todd.
Todd
07 Calvin            77 TT500
95 Sport 1100      04 Breva 750
82 Katana           79 GS850G
72 "Crud"dorado
03 Barely Davidson 883 Huggy
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Online Wayne Orwig

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #28 on: October 09, 2015, 10:49:27 AM »
I SAW and READ the header and am still asking how that results in the ring gap?

Not a challenge, merely simple curiosity. Potentially stretching the chain I can cypher out for myself but am not too clear on possible effects on the ring dimensions. Is the ring smaller, the bore bigger, bad Luigied rings in the first place?

I just wanted to be sure that someone does not confuse roller followers and ring wear. The ring wear was covered in another thread. That owner added the O2 sensor fooler, and slowly filled the crankcase with raw gasoline. The lack of lube wore the rings, bearings, chains,etc. I don't recall the exact comments but I think the rings suffered the most wear.
I think Vasco was reusing a lot of those photos from that project to go over the rollerisation, so stuck some of them in here.
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Offline cruzziguzzi

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Re: Rollerisation of the 8V.
« Reply #29 on: October 09, 2015, 10:55:25 AM »
I just wanted to be sure that someone does not confuse roller followers and ring wear. The ring wear was covered in another thread. That owner added the O2 sensor fooler, and slowly filled the crankcase with raw gasoline. The lack of lube wore the rings, bearings, chains,etc. I don't recall the exact comments but I think the rings suffered the most wear.
I think Vasco was reusing a lot of those photos from that project to go over the rollerisation, so stuck some of them in here.

Thanks Wayne. I'll look back for these other bits then. I had no idea that the effect might be that dramatic.

Normally, I have been generally blowing off these roller threads as I felt myself functionally immune to them through lack of likelihood in my ownership of one. A friend recently though, has been tempting me with a threateningly low priced Daytona so now I'm more curious.

Pete's near religious railing against these devices takes on an even stronger tone now.

Todd.
Todd
07 Calvin            77 TT500
95 Sport 1100      04 Breva 750
82 Katana           79 GS850G
72 "Crud"dorado
03 Barely Davidson 883 Huggy
Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top.

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