Author Topic: Time for a long road trip  (Read 5323 times)

Offline Rough Edge racing

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3494
  • Location: Marion NY
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #120 on: October 01, 2018, 07:00:42 AM »
 I won't have time too look closely at the ST2 for a few months....But while we are talking regulators, I see there's quite a few available, do have one model that's recommended from experience?  Thanks
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

Offline Tusayan

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1046
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #121 on: October 01, 2018, 08:50:00 AM »
I'm sorry I didn't keep records on the '98 ST2 regulator replacement, all the records went with the bike to the new owner. There is info out there on the net. If I recall correctly, one solution is to use the rectifier/regulator from a Japanese bike with a large three phase alternator, but wire only one of the phase connections to the ST2 single phase alternator.

I remembered one more thing... the rear engine mount bolt is prone to failure unless addressed and that can take the engine cases with it. This is the result of the rising rate rear suspension linkage and the huge forces in the rear shock that result.  Also, Ducati installed a bolt threaded just a little too far so that threads are bearing in the frame lug.  They fixed the problem by increasing the bolt size to 12-mm from 10-mm on later bikes, and that's one solution.  You can also buy higher strength replacement bolts from Nichols and others.  I did it the expensive Nichols way, but spending big bux to address the issue is not really necessary and the existing front bolt doesn't break.
« Last Edit: October 01, 2018, 09:05:52 AM by Tusayan »


Online LowRyter

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 12133
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #122 on: October 01, 2018, 09:43:42 PM »
There are a million bikes that will fill the bill.  Only a mind reader will know what suits you.

For your budget, I'd seriously think about some Japanese bikes but I can't read your mind why you wouldn't consider one.  :shocked:

And really have no more comment.   :violent1:

Buy a bike, ride it and tell us how it went.   :whip2:
John L  (Guzzi's Chime at 9AM & Midnight)

Offline Rough Edge racing

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3494
  • Location: Marion NY
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #123 on: October 02, 2018, 05:34:41 AM »
There are a million bikes that will fill the bill.  Only a mind reader will know what suits you.

For your budget, I'd seriously think about some Japanese bikes but I can't read your mind why you wouldn't consider one.  :shocked:

And really have no more comment.   :violent1:

Buy a bike, ride it and tell us how it went.   :whip2:
  Have you been actually reading this thread?

 Tusayan, On  fitting a three phase voltage regulator to the Ducati single phase ...to handle the same watts, single phase(two conductors) has 73 percent more current on each wire compared to three phase (3 conductors)  I believe using only two legs of a three phase regulator/rectifier may overload the diodes...
 
« Last Edit: October 02, 2018, 05:36:32 AM by Rough Edge racing »
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

Offline Tusayan

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 1046
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #124 on: October 02, 2018, 09:48:12 AM »
Tusayan, On  fitting a three phase voltage regulator to the Ducati single phase ...to handle the same watts, single phase(two conductors) has 73 percent more current on each wire compared to three phase (3 conductors)  I believe using only two legs of a three phase regulator/rectifier may overload the diodes...
 

I believe you're right, and had the same thought as I was writing about that.  For whatever reason the units being installed on '98 ST2s seem to be Japanese units removed from bikes with three-phase alternators.  Maybe they are much over designed and work for that reason (?) Or there is something I'm missing.  There's info if you search on Ducati.ms, but I've forgotten how I did it way back when.

If I understand correctly, the basic issue is that '98 ST2 uses the highest power output single phase PM alternator of any bike, certainty of any Ducati with the same Ducati Energia hardware, so direct replacement regulator/regulators aren't simple to find.
 
I did something similar once to replace the regulator on a F1B with a 916 unit, but IIRC the F1 alternator is a kind of odd Duck center tap thing and so it was a different situation. I can't remember the exact details of that either.  You'll figure it out.  Good luck!  :grin:
« Last Edit: October 02, 2018, 10:08:02 AM by Tusayan »

Offline Rough Edge racing

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3494
  • Location: Marion NY
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #125 on: December 17, 2018, 06:12:14 AM »
 I finally got to look at the ST2 on the lift after getting the old Triumph finished off...The Triumph is a story with the the Honda FRZ front forks and Ducati Brembo brakes and tuning tricks learned from my race bike...

  Took about 1/2 hour to remove all the fairing parts..I pulled the left side engine side cover to check the alternator..It looks fine and ohms out ok...It has a new voltage regulator but not the finned style claiming to be an improvement .The ECU has a Ducati performance chip to go with the open airbox and Staintune exhaust. The valve lash was exact to the specs..everything looked original and in good shape except for the damn oil leaks from the head/cylinder joint. Ducati guys tell me this is a problem on all ST2's up to about 2001...I pulled off both heads and cylinders...Not that difficult as some say EXCEPT the nits for the head/cylinder studs were seized from rust.. nothing else on the bike showed of signs of corrosion.. These two valve liquid cooled engine are just like the air cooled engines in that they have no head gaskets..a few o rings for oil and coolant passages... I lapped the cylinders to the heads with grinding compound and now have a leak free fit...But it appears the early heads will leak some oil no matter what...Doesn't hurt the running of it,just have to clean it off occasionally.
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

Offline jumpmaster

  • Guzzi Mentor
  • ****
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 318
  • Location: Gaithersburg, MD
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #126 on: December 17, 2018, 12:45:03 PM »
. The valve lash was exact to the specs..everything looked original and in good shape except for the damn oil leaks from the head/cylinder joint. Ducati guys tell me this is a problem on all ST2's up to about 2001...I pulled off both heads and cylinders...Not that difficult as some say EXCEPT the nits for the head/cylinder studs were seized from rust.. nothing else on the bike showed of signs of corrosion.. These two valve liquid cooled engine are just like the air cooled engines in that they have no head gaskets..a few o rings for oil and coolant passages... I lapped the cylinders to the heads with grinding compound and now have a leak free fit...But it appears the early heads will leak some oil no matter what...Doesn't hurt the running of it,just have to clean it off occasionally.

Can you make head gaskets?  How about head gasket sealer compounds - Permatex, Yamabond, etc.?
JC
90 Mille GT, 73 Eldorado, 75 Norton Commando, 46 Whizzer, 13 Harley Road Glide

Offline pressureangle

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • *
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 602
  • '85 LeMans 1000, '97 1100 Sport i, '89 Mille GT
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #127 on: December 18, 2018, 08:22:02 AM »
I just finished my first (we won't talk about Daytona '82) long distance tour, 10,000 miles Florida-Seattle-Florida in September and October on my 1100 Sport. I had only my Aerostich suit, Gasola boots, a small tank bag and 24 liter tailbag.
Best thing I ever did was travel light on a bike I love. I think the ST2 is a great choice.
For clothes, I had only 3 sets of long underarmor, 4 pairs of Thorlo socks, one pair of jeans and one t-shirt, and one Patagonia hoody. I have Held Rodney gloves. With all that, I was adequately comfortable from 98* in Florida-Georgia to 45* in Montana.
A huge part of thinking the trip through was recognizing how many times I wished I'd packed less, even in the car. I figured if necessary I could shop at the Salvation Army and give it back when I didn't need it anymore. In my case, I knew I'd be on the bike nearly always, not barhopping or dancing and dating. I had riding gear and clothes for Denny's after dark. Less is more.
Something wistful and amusing, yet poignant.

Offline Rough Edge racing

  • Guzzi Hero
  • *****
  • Posts: 3494
  • Location: Marion NY
Re: Time for a long road trip
« Reply #128 on: December 18, 2018, 09:43:45 AM »
Can you make head gaskets?  How about head gasket sealer compounds - Permatex, Yamabond, etc.?

  The no liner aluminum cylinder, nikasil surface, has a raised lip around the circumference of the bore that makes contact with a machined surface on the head. The o rings sealing oil and coolant passages are outside this and that part of the head and cylinder is about .015" shy of contact..I thought about sealer but I doubted it would have effect here.
 With each head and cylinder on the bench, I rotated the head back and forth on the cylinder using lapping compound until there was an even matte finish on both sealing areas. Then flipped the head upside down,set the cylinder on it no sealer and poured in a water/detergent mix...zero leaks .....
 I believe when the engine is running there is some weird expansion rates or fretting and a small gap opens up ,not enough for compression to actually blow  by but enough for combustion by products to seep through...
I ride junk, some of it actually goes fast

 

***Wildguzzi Official Logo High Quality 5 Color Window Decals Back In Stock***
Shipping in USA Only. Awesome quality. Back by popular demand. All proceeds go back into the forum.
http://www.wildguzzi.com/Products/products.htm
Advertise Here